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Kubota suggestions for my scenario

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thespaugh
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 10 Stanwood, WA
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2008-07-20          155430


Hi newbee to the forum. I致e been reading quite a few posts over the last week as I知 needing a compact tractor for a 4 acre parcel that I知 about to being building my house on. I was hoping for some insight and perhaps some confirmation on my initial thoughts. I live about an hour north of Seattle and my land is heavily treed in areas with the remaining untried land being covered with blackberry vines most over 8ft tall. I知 hoping when the road is blasted through the heavy equipment operator can be persuaded to run over much of this blackberry mess and give me a manageable starting point for my compact tractor. With that being said my plans are to initially remove/tame the remaining weeds/BB vines (brush hog?), lay seed, do landscaping/flowerbeds, maybe some backfill work around the house, tree clearing (FEL), and eventually have 3 acres for 吐inish mowing (thinking 60 deck off rear PTO or mmm) as well as with a nice (home-owner size) garden (PTO tiller) and a 600 gravel drive (box blade). Also, the back of my house will be 60 ft from a 200ft cliff so mowing in this area will have some limitations on turning / space. The lot itself is fairly flat.

I swung into the local Kubota and New Holland dealerships and told the Kubota guy my story (the New Holland sales guy was with another customer). The Kubota guy recommended the b7800 or b2920. I brought up the b3030 and he claimed the b2920 replaced it I know he didn稚 have any in stock so maybe this is why he said thatbut he did say he expects a used b3030 will show up next week on trade in. The non-sales guy at NH said the TC30 or T1510 would be similar to the Kubota痴 I was recommended. I asked the Kubota guy about the L series and he recommended against this as he claims it will tear up my lawn during mowing and normal stopping/reversingthis is Seattle weather so the grass/ground is wet a good part of the time. The reason I ask about the L is that I can get a used L3400 (gear drive) for around $14.5k with ~150hrs, FEL, 600# counter balance and rear blade from a private owner (no tax). According to what I read the L3400 is ~700# heaver without the counterbalance.

So here are my questions:
1) Is the L too heavy and too much tractor for maintaining 3 acres where the grass and ground can be wet?
2) Are the 30hp B series I was recommended enough tractor given my scenario?
3) Is the TC30/ T1510 a reasonable NH alternative to the Bs suggested?
4) What JD model is comparable?
5) Any suggestions what might be best for taking out blackberry vines or is this beyond a compact tractor.

Sorry for the long winded post. I look forward to hearing from some tractor veterans!

Chris


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hardwood
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 3583 iowa
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2008-07-20          155433


Chris; Welcome to the form, I've never been to your part of the USA, but maybe someday. Thinking about the blackberry vines, a five ft. rotary cutter on a 30-35 HP. compact will grind them up just by going slow and probably in reverse would work best. The other thought about the berry vines is the little sharp "stunps" the cutter will leave possibly puncturing your tires. R-4 tires for your tractor have a harder and thicker tread that would be best for that situation and also are pretty gentle on turf. I'm not a big fan of MMM mowers, they are a real pain to mount and dismount plus they are pretty pricey, I have a rear mount finish mower, a Landpride, they are easy on and easy off. I've got a five ft. 3pt. Landpride tiller for my Deere 4310, (32 hp.), you can do a bunch of tillage in a little while, but be forewarned, no matter the brand of tiller, stones, roots, etc. can stop the best of them. The most used three pt. attachment I own is a six ft. box blade. I'm sure you will want a front end loader, you will find yourself using it every day for something. don't waste money buying the counterballance weight for the loader, just buy a three pt. box blade instead, it serves the same purpose and you will find iot a very uisefull tool also. One last thing I can think of is don't buy any tractor without a front wheel assist or 4 wheel drive, tractors can be pretty helpless without it. Nothing wrong with buying used and unless you are planning on doing front yard work I wouldn't worry too much about the used one being too heavy. I'm pretty much a Deere person except for three point equipment, and as you may have guessed by now Landpride is my favorite there. Far as a Deere of the size you would want, a 3000 series in about the 32-35 hp. range, they have about every feature you can possibly need. Frank. ....

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kwschumm
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 5764 NW Oregon
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2008-07-20          155435


We have 15 acres of doug firs here in the Portland area. Frank is right, a 5-foot cutter will make short work of the blackberry, just go slow. I think you'd want a medium-duty cutter, not the light duty, since on a piece of rough land you will encounter stumps and other nasty stuff. That means a minimum of 25 pto hp. Any machine of that size will do the other stuff you want. As far as tires, my JD came with R4s and they were nearly useless in clay soil, wet or dry. R1s AG tires will handle the blackberry stumps just fine and give excellent traction in wet, muddy conditions but will be damage turf for mowing. Maybe you need R4s or Turfs and use chains in the rough. You need 4WD, too, and if you have hills get your tires spaced out wide for best stability. If you plan to mow on soft turf you need a light machine and turf style flotation tires. It really sounds to me like you need two machines. Maybe buy/rent or pay someone to do the heavy work initially and then get something smaller and lighter for the long haul down the road.

Oh, the blackberry will keep popping up for years. Get some 2,4D (Crossbow is one brand) and a sprayer and spot-spray every year to keep them under control. ....

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candoarms
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1932 North Dakota
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2008-07-20          155436


Thespaugh,

You're facing a scenario similar to the one I faced, when I moved into this place.

You might be in line for a larger tractor to start out with, and then trade for a smaller tractor when the house and yard are finished.

To start out with, I would consider the L-Series tractor with ag tires (R1 Tires). A few years down the road, it might be time to trade the L-Series tractor for the B-7800 with turf tires.

While in the Army, I was stationed at Fort Lewis for a full year. We went through a period of time, near Christmas, when we didn't see the sun for 25 days straight. Suicide rates set a record in the area. The rain just kept coming. Anything but turf tires will tear up the sod in those wet conditions.

If I were you, I'd start out with a larger tractor. You can always trade the Kubota later. They hold their value better than most brands.

Joel ....

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bvance
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 280 The Great Pacific NorthWet, Olympia, WA
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2008-07-20          155439


Hi Chris,

Welcome to the Board. You will enjoy all of the great info you get on this site as you work on your new home.

We're neighbors as I live in Olympia, just south of you by 2 hours.

I have 2 acres and built a home in 2000. I did all of things you have mentioned you want to do, including the Blackberries. In my opinion, a BX 24 will do you just fine. Joel and I often disagree on this subject. He favors a larger tractor in some cases I just don't believe are necessary. (Joel's a great guy with lots of great advice)

The BX models are amazing machines. Some look at them as toys, but believe me, they aren't. I wish I would have bought the backhoe model, but they did not have it when I bought my BX. Some will tell you that the BX model only handles Cat 0 3 point equipment which is not true. The BX will handle CAT 1, but it does have limited 3 pt. lift heigth, so you do have to buy attachments that are made for the BX model. Most mfg. make all types of 3 pt. attachments.

I am very familiar with clay. I have turf tires on my BX and they do just fine in the clay and you will want turf tires for mowing the lawn.

Another advantage is the size of the BX vs the B or L tractors when you want to give them proper storage in a shop or garage.

Which ever model you get, get the hydro transmission...the only way to go. Your FEL and boxblade will be the attachments you will use all the time. Very useful.

Don't get me wrong, a B model would do a fine job but my point is so would a BX. I would strongly suggest a backhoe for when you begin to plant all of your shrubs and trees. Digging in clay is not much fun at all.

Have a great time with your purhcase and your projects!

Brian

....

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kwschumm
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 5764 NW Oregon
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2008-07-20          155441


Brian, soil conditions change from region to region and you certainly must have different clay than we have. It's so sticky here wet that when you step in it and pull your foot out the size of your foot has doubled. See my pics for how badly it will plug up an R4.

When it's dry it is so powdery that if you step on a dry patch on a hill your feet will slip right out from under you. With R4s I nearly got stuck in dry conditions while crossing some tire tracks on flat land perpendicularly - the rear tires would just spin in the powder. Had to put it in 4wd with diff lock to get out.

R1s have never given me a bit of trouble in wet or dry conditions but they do leave some serious tracks in wet. ....

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bvance
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 280 The Great Pacific NorthWet, Olympia, WA
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2008-07-20          155442


Ken,

You're right, but I think I have the same kind of clay you do...I experienced the same conditions that you have but was able to work around those conditions. Except the dry powder. When mine is dry it is as hard as concrete.

It's just that I belive the average home-owner will be happier with turf than R-4's if they do a lot of mowing. I think you do quite a bit more than the average homeowner with your tractor.

I re-read Chris' post and see he wants to do something with the trees. My question is what? If he has a lot of trees to cut and move out, I would suggest that he has the loggers do it when they come in to clear for his house. Even a B model will have a tough time moving trees, depending on how he goes about it.

Depending on what he wants to do with the trees, a B model might be best for him, but I also want him to know I think he would be happy with a BX as well

Brian ....

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____________________________________________________________________________________
Kubota suggestions for my scenario

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kwschumm
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 5764 NW Oregon
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2008-07-20          155443


Brian,

For me the dry powder was the last straw. There was a guy here who drove down to the back of our house in a 4wd Jeep Cherokee. He couldn't get back up the hill in 4WD with M&S tires in the dry powder (all four tires were spinning and he was sliding backwards). I had to tow him up with the tractor. Funny thing is, another time the same guy with the same Cherokee got stuck on the same hill when it was wet. :)

But you are right, the average homeowner would probably be better off with turfs. Chains can probably get them through the wet clay.

Whenever tree work is being done in the woods I automatically think R1s. Traction conditions in the woods vary a lot and the big lugs have never let me down.

Ken
....

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candoarms
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1932 North Dakota
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2008-07-20          155445


Bvance,

My earlier comments were based on the fact that he has a lot of tree work to do. I honestly don't believe a B-Series tractor is large enough for that job.

Clearing a lot in the area north of Seattle is going to require a fairly heavy tractor, good traction, and tires that can withstand the punctures from those sharp tree shoots.

I'm with you on the BX tractors. They'll handle most any chore the average homeowner will come up against. However, they aren't big enough for the initial work involved here. I honestly believe even the B-Series Kubota would be overwhelmed by the project.

There is no such thing as having the right machine for every job. We always face compromises. Even the local farmers, who own several different tractors, find themselves wishing that they had a tractor better suited for certain tasks.

In this case, I think we're talking about a migration from heavy-duty work in the beginning, to routine yard maintenance sometime down the road. I wouldn't rule out an L-Series Kubota for the for early stages of this project, with plans to scale down in size once the great majority of the heavy work is completed.

No matter what, it's necessary to have 4-wheel drive, a heavy duty loader, good traction, and plenty of weight for the early, site preparation work. I also recommend the hydro transmission. I wouldn't go back to a manual transmission unless I'm working more than 25 acres. For extended periods of loader work, the hydrostatic transmission is WELL worth the extra few bucks.

I wouldn't rule out a BX Series tractor at some point down the road -- when the lawn and gardens are planted, the flower beds are established, and the driveway is completed. A BX tractor will easily be able to maintain even the largest lawns.

The weather west of the Cascade Mountain Range is something to behold. I've never seen so much rain in my life. It might not be a bad idea to consider a cab, but for the fact that the heavy tree work would beat the cab up pretty badly. At some point in the future, a cab would be very much a necessity in that climate.

Have a good day, everyone.

Joel ....

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hardwood
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 3583 iowa
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2008-07-20          155450


As most of you old timers around here know by now, I do not like hydro drive tractors, I've tried them and didn't find anytning they could do that my suttle trans won't except waste fuel in excess heat and money in the purchase price. That being said please understand that I AM NOT picking on any specfific brand whan I make the following observations. I do not like Deere hydros because of the brake pedals being on the left instead of the right which all old farm tractor drivers are used to. Last Sunday while on a drive in Southeast Minnesota we came thru a county seat size town which I can't remember the name of but there was a dealership with a lot of new and used Kubota and Ford/NH compacts and full size farm tractors on the display lot. The wife didn't mind so I went back to look them over, having never really taken the time to give both brands a good look see. Now my question about both brands, how do you operate the hydro control pedal and the steering brakes at the same time with your right foot? Frank. ....

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candoarms
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1932 North Dakota
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2008-07-20          155452


Frank,

I've never had to step on the brake while using my Kubota hydro tractor. It turns plenty sharp enough without needing to use the brakes to aid in steering.

The only time I've ever used my brakes is as a parking brake. Both brake pedals are locked together. They've never been used individually. I use the parking parking brake when I have the little grandkids around, or when hooking up to a trailer parked on a slope.

Like you, I wondered how in the world I'd ever be able to use the steering brakes with a hydro tractor......until I realized that it simply isn't necessary with these smaller tractors.

Joel ....

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JOHNWTHOMAS
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 48 SOMERSET, KY
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2008-07-20          155453


Now my question about both brands, how do you operate the hydro control pedal and the steering brakes at the same time with your right foot? Frank.
First, I've bought 6 Kubotas in the past 4 years. Started with BX's and now have L and BX and F. All of them Hydo's and I don't know what steering brakes are (other than the ones on Dozers). With a hydro you go forward, stop or back with the one pedal under your right foot. There is a brake pedal that I only use when I have the tractor stopped and want to ensure it stays stopped when I get off so I lock the brake pedal down. I personally would never buy any tractor with FEL that isn't hydro. Also for mowing will have to be hydro only. Just one mans opinion.
I bought 5 acres and built my own home. Have done alot of mowing and FEL work in the past 4 years. Started with BX2200, added BX1500 traded BX2200 for a B7800 and now traded the B7800 to a L3240HST and traded the BX1500 to a BX2350. Trading with Kubotas is a very doable concept but it's similiar to car trading. Dealer wants to make a profit and needs to to stay in business. When the person comes with the big earthmover, I'm sure they will do what you want if you pay. They'll be cheaper at that point than having to return with travel expenses and minimal charges. I recommend you have them do the heavy (blackberry bushes and some trees) stuff then attack the remaining jobs yourself. Dozers and front loaders can do in minutes what takes tractors hours to do and that's they way they are designed and built. Sometimes we get a bit carried away with our tractors because they will do so much with the right attachments and enough horsepower but they can't really compete against a piece of equipment specifically designed for just earthmoving. BX's are great and capable but slower than a B if that matters to you. The B also has a higher ground clearance if that matters to you. The L is alot heavier and more expensive and even more ground clearance but I'll go back to the B's when I trade next. Course I'll keep my BX2350 for my mowing. BX can't be beat for mowing with some tractor work. The B's are full powered machines and to me the best all around machine for my purposes. I don't know about the tires needed for your weather and ground conditions but your fellow tractor owners in your area or your local dealer should be able to tell you. ....

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kwschumm
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 5764 NW Oregon
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2008-07-20          155454


Obviously, with the brakes on the left and hydro pedals on the right you can't operate both with your right foot.

I've used and needed steering brakes from time to time. When working in tight quarters in the woods at times I've found myself between two trees, one right in front of the tractor and one right behind. Sometimes I got there by sliding sideways and sometimes I can't figure out how the tractor ended up there. Either way, the steering alone wouldn't easily navigate out of the situation where the steering brakes make the tractor spin on a dime.

Unlock the two brake pedals, pressed one of 'em with the left foot and press the go pedal with the right foot. No big deal, easy and almost intuitive if you don't have to unlearn old habits. You don't need 'em very often but the tighter the quarters the more you'll want them.

And there's nothing wrong with a gear tractor but I'd take a hydro anytime (unless it's one of the tractor models with a gigantic treadle pedal that takes up the entire right side of the floorboard). ....

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bvance
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 280 The Great Pacific NorthWet, Olympia, WA
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2008-07-20          155455


Chris,

I think Joel and I are saying pretty much the same thing, tree work is generally done best by the professionals and there isn't one tractor that would handle the trees well and then mow your lawn without tearing it up.

Depending on how big the trees are, how many you need to take care of and how far you need to move them, you might get them done using a heavy dose of caution and a B sized tractor and a lot of time. But you might be best off to have the trees professionally done and then go with a tractor that would best handle the chores you will be doing on a day to day basis.

If it's just mowing, moving dirt around, FEL work and the like, a BX in my mind would be the right tractor. If you are finding yourself doing a lot of work in the trees or pulling an occasional dead fall out, the B would be a better tractor due to it's clearance, size and additional power.

As to the HST and gear driven, with all due respect to Frank, I think you will find the HST the best all-around unit for the average home owner. I also have used both extensively, and I wouldn't go back to a gear driven tractor. I think you will find the HST is the most favored preference here on the Tractor Board.

Good with your choices.

Brian ....

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thespaugh
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 10 Stanwood, WA
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2008-07-20          155458


Wow, such great responses so quick. Fortunately I do not have clay soil - due to the cliff I actually had to have a geo-tech study done (being from TX I can't believe the regulations and permitting process to build a house up here). Anyway, according to the report I have 4ft of Sandy Loam/Loamy Fine Sand on the surface. I saw a few recommendations for 25hp at the PTO...the kubota B series I was recommended by the dealer are 21-23 at the rear. Is this close enough? Also, bvance did you tackle blackberries? The tree clearing will for the most part be handled by someone elseI envision over the next couple years tackling a ~10 trees each year. These are pine / cedar and tend to be telephone pole size. Anyone with an L size tractor care to answer on the potential for tearing up the lawn?

Thanks again,
Chris
....

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kwschumm
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 5764 NW Oregon
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2008-07-20          155461


Is scotch broom growing up there? It's a lot harder than Blackberry vines. I've had some really thick, tall patches of blackberry with vines up to 2" thick at the base. 25 pto horsepower and my trusty MX5 rotary cutter handled it with ease. A few less hp and you might have to go a bit slower or go with a 4' cutter instead of 5. But 2" scotch broom branches are a lot harder than blackberry vines.

Here's a trick we use to pull blackberry vines out of trees, but I can't recommend it :) We have a big tow behind chipper with hydraulic feed. I like to cut the thick blackberry vines off at the base and feed them into the chipper. The chipper does the hard work of pulling the vines out of the trees. I can't recommend it for safety reasons - if you were to get a foot tangled in the vines they are very tough and could drag you right into the chipper. We stand well back when doing this.
....

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bvance
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 280 The Great Pacific NorthWet, Olympia, WA
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2008-07-20          155462


Chris,

I rented a 50hp SkidSteer with a brush hog attached. I had blackberries mounded to 15 feet high and the hog ate 'em all. A wonder to behold as it pulled runners as far away as 30'. A B series with a brush hog would take care of most blackberries.

I can guarantee you a L series would ruin your lawn. I have an L series at my place in Idaho, and it would do a number on your lawn. Especially around here, in the spring and late fall your grass is always wet and soft. Even a BX series will tear up the lawn then if it has bar tire.

If you want to mow your lawn in this country with your tractor, you will have to have turf tires. You will find there are always trade-offs with equipment and you will never find the perfect tractor that does everything.

If you want to mow your lawn with your tractor and do the other things you want to do, I would get a B with turf tires. Yeah, it will spin a bit in the mud, but if you focus on doing your heavy work in the summer, the turf tread will do fine in the trees too. Or....get a B with bar tires and then a lawn tractor for the lawn...then that gets expensive to own and store them both.

Brian

....

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bvance
Join Date: Jul 2004
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2008-07-20          155463


Ken,

Yep, Scotch Broom is here too! But not much in the residential areas, I would be surprised if Chris has any.

Brian ....

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thespaugh
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 10 Stanwood, WA
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2008-07-21          155466


My old house had a field next door that was full of scotch broom (~3 miles away) but on the new land fortunately none - only acres of blackberry vines. ....

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thespaugh
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 10 Stanwood, WA
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2008-07-21          155469


Brian,

You think an L with turf tires would tear up the lawn? Sorry to keep questioning this but I keep thinking about buying the most powerful tractor I can. I like the idea of having a 30hp rear PTO but if the weight is an issue I'd go with a B. The other thing I noticed was the JD are heavy. A 3000 series JD weighs in at 2700 which is in line with the L2800. I take it both are too heavy our area?

Thanks again for all your help.
Chris ....

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hardwood
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 3583 iowa
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2008-07-21          155471


JOHNWTHOMAS; Individual wheel brakes just like the ones on your Kubota are an important turning aid on farm tractors. On most modern farm tractors that are equiped with a front wheel assist the front wheel assist automaticly disengages the instant you touch either wheel brake, then will automaticly reengage soon as you take your foot of the brake pedal. Using the wheel brake to aid in turning on row ends without the front wheel assist just works better, that is why I'd be lost without the wheel brakes even on my little Deere.
Joel; I've driven past the dealership I mentioned in SE Minnesoata many times on a weekday when they were open but never stopped in. I would like to teat drive a Kubota or a Ford/NH with the hydro pedal/wheel brake setup we have been discussing just to se how it works, but I just won't waste a dealer's time demonstrating something to me that I'm not going to buy anyhow, that's not fair to them. As I said to John,I would be totally lost without using the brakes as a turning aid, just somethiong I've been used to since a kid. I often think about how fortunate we are to live in a country where we can differ on the chioce of something as simple as the transmission of a little tractor let alone major political opinions without some government agency telling us that we cannot have a chioce. Enjoy your day. Frank. ....

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Art White
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 6898 Waterville New York
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2008-07-21          155472



Sorry Frank, we get to see four wheel drive tractors that are in the thirty year range and often it doesn't take them that long to break a hub or part of the steering linkage.

I don't recommend that a four wheel drive tractor use the brakes for steering!!

I do realize that there are certain situations that people feel that it is justified and I also know that some manufacturers say go for it! Why not! Chances are it won't fail the first time and very well won't fail till the warrantee is out! Guess who won$$$$$$!!!!! Four wheel drive tractors normally should have about thirty five percent of the weight on the front without the loader on!

Back to the question at hand, The B-3030 is not discontinued! I think that the large size B-series would be all you need! To get to the L-series, remember the steering with the brakes, if the tractor is smaller it will be more manuverable and managable. Might it take more time for the inital clearing than a larger tractor, yes but the year after your time will be more productive.

You should look at the long term goals of the tractor not the short term. I haven't seen tomany things a smaall tractor can't do, it might just take a longer the first time.

The B-series chassis would do fine for your work. You might find that some of the money you save might buy a few more attachments to make your work easier yet next year! ....

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thespaugh
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 10 Stanwood, WA
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2008-07-21          155478


Thanks for the input Art. Seems like most agree the large B is the way to go for me. ....

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kthompson
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 5242 South Carolina
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2008-07-21          155480


Frank, having grown up with the farm tractor and the brakes on the HST you really don't use them as much or I don't. As has been said for stopping at least on our nearly level ground seldom need them. Remember much of the work this tractor do is not on fields where you are making such tight turns as most use brakes for. But you can do it even more like the gear trans than has been said. On my Kubota it has a HST Pedal lock. You push the HST pedal down as far (for ground speed) as you desire and pull the lever locking it there until you push the pedal again. Then your right foot is free to use on a brake pedal. You will want to say but you can operatet the trans then but the pedal lock keeps it running and if you need to stop you use the left foot on the clutch pedal just like you do with a geared transmission. At same time depending on your trans and the range you are in you can still change ranges as you would gears for the speed in turning if you desire to. It really is mostly a mental issue as you have to realize it is just different. I often use my B 2710 Kubota with HST in the field for mostly spreader or sprayer. Neither normally requires sharp turns but often use the HST pedal lock just so foot and leg does not get so tired.

Ken I believe it was you who said they had slide between trees, boy sometimes a chain saw is hard to beat! kt ....

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kwschumm
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 5764 NW Oregon
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2008-07-21          155481


Quote:
Originally Posted by kthompson | view 155480
Ken I believe it was you who said they had slide between trees, boy sometimes a chain saw is hard to beat! kt


With my luck a gust of wind would come along at just the wrong time and the tree would fall right on the tractor :) ....

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kthompson
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2008-07-21          155490


Quote:
Originally Posted by kwschumm | view 155481
With my luck a gust of wind would come along at just the wrong time and the tree would fall right on the tractor :)


Then other times it just happens. Sure is a sick feeling to see your pickup (or house) is not as far away as the tree is long. Don't ask how I know. :) ....

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bvance
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 280 The Great Pacific NorthWet, Olympia, WA
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2008-07-21          155497


Chris,

In response to your question as to whether an L series would tear up your lawn? I will guarantee it will.

You need to be aware that a B and even a BX will tear up your lawn with bar tires on. You need to remember, grass stays green here all year around and one needs to start mowing it in April and the ground is very soft then up until sometime in June. It begins to soften again in September, long before the grass quits growing.

You will find that when any tractor is in 4X4 mode the front tires will be stiff on turns on not turn freely. When this happens, even turf tires will scrape the lawn a bit, but nothing like a bar tire will in the same instance. A bar tire will gouge the lawn pretty good and especially if it is at all soft. You can take it out of 4X4 and the front tires will turn freely and you may not tear up the grass, but you won't go anywhere. Because if the grass is the least bit wet or even a tiny slope to it, your tractor will spin, necessitating 4X4. So....if you want to mow your lawn with ANY tractor you get, you will be very disappointed with bar tires.

Bottom line, IMHO, an L is will most assuredly gouge your lawn. Even if it drives over it and does not turn. It is just simply too heavy. If I were you, I would get a B with turf tires, because in the long run, you will be mowing a lot longer than you will be doing anything else and when you need a bit more traction, wait until it drys or put on chains. You will be amazed at how little, if ever, you will put chains on. I don't even own a set of chains for my BX. And I worked around my house construction for a year. Sure some times, I just parked it, but even if I had put on chains, I would have made a bigger mess than I cared to clean up.

Good luck,

Brian ....

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kthompson
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2008-07-22          155509


bvance, so they can not use ztr mowers there to mow with since they have less traction by far than does a tractor in 2 wheel drive does. We have a slope we mow that must run about 25 degrees and when it is wet our ZTR can not climb it but our B 2710 with 72 inch rfm will run right up it in 2 wheel drive. It is covered with grass very well and will be soft also. Our mowing season runs about the same as yours but realize you have more rain fall. The B 2710 has R 4 tires on it and it may leave some impression when soil is wet but not as much as mower's wheels do.

It would seem if the tractor tires leave as much an impression as is said, you must use a mmm and have the weight of the mower off of the smaller tires of a rfm and on the tractor tires.

bvance, no way am I saying you are not correct. Just pointing out how much it seems some things vary across this land. kt ....

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bvance
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2008-07-23          155554


KT,

I do have a MMM, but not sure that would make much difference with the traction issue would it? I'm sure if I had bar tires on my BX, I could mow my lawn in 2WD, but I also know it would tear it up even more.

I have 2 separate lawns at my place. One is my "show lawn" around my house and the other is a lawn around my shop which also extends into a bigger 1/2 acre play area. I cannot use my turf-tired BX on my "show" lawn at any time, because it leaves noticeable impressions in wetter conditions. On my other lawn, I use the BX and it creates fairly minor, but noticeable scalping when the lawn is wet in the spring time or fall. This lawn also has some minor slope, and if I am stopped and try to go up a slight incline in 2WD the back tires spin and I have to put it into 4WD. I'm sure with bar tires, it would not spin, but then I would not be happy with all of the scalping early and late in the year.

So...I leave it in 4WD 80% of the time and it does everything I ask it to, even when I take it out into the woods.

Brian ....

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kthompson
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2008-07-23          155557


Brain, does not a mmm hang from the tractor putting its weight on the tractor or a good part of it compared to a rfm? I just assumed a mmm was a lot like a deck on a normal mower with wheels on it only to prevent scalping not to ride on totally as a rfm does with very little if any weight on the tractor. All rfm I have seen has all weight on its own wheels when mowing so it can fully float.

How does the lawn being wet contribute to scalping? Is it due to the tractor tires sinking in the soil? Are you able to use a septic system there? Per the experts here on septic tanks the difference in the dirt with in just a few feet can make a lot of difference. It amazes me how much soil can vary and in such a short distance. Last Saturday was digging a stump. One side was a red sticky clay and the other side a totally white sand. kt
....

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Art White
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2008-07-23          155579



About the zero turns and hill sides. There are units that don't have enough tire or weight to them to mow anything more then level ground. I see commercial guys with them on hills and banks that I wouldn't even consider putting a tractor! ....

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bongowu
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 3 Arlington, Wa
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2008-08-06          155887


I live 20 minutes south of you in arlington and went through this same dilemma just a few months ago. I bought 8 acres of raw land which I cleared 2 of and built my house on. There is a lot of clay on my property and the tractor did just fine with the R4 tires in four wheel drive. I did a lot of research on all the manufacturers and ended up with a L3400 HST. It has done almost everything that I wanted including pulling my neighbors brand new TC30 out of his field. If you want good advice on a Kubota go to Scholtens Tractor in Burlington and talk to Jim he was very informative when I bought mine. ....

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thespaugh
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2008-08-20          156198


We might actually be a little closer than 20 minutes - I'm out near Warm Beach...likely west of you. Has your L3400 torn up your lawn? I understand you have clay, which I have none.

I actually made it up to Scholtens but the normal sales guy was out and a young kid helped me...he really wasn't any help. I've also been down to Sound tractor in Everett.

I still haven't made up my mind but I'm thinking Deere 3x20 series, B3030 or a used Grand L (3130, 3430, 3830). Snohomish County permits are taking forever so this has given me more time to vacillate on which tractor to get. Then again, maybe a L3400 is right...I think the size and capabilities are perfect for my 4 acres but I've read about problems with the cable connecting the PTO and it's over-riding clutch. I also, like the bells and whistles of the JD and Kub models I've mentioned above. You 100% happy with your L3400?

I'm a little concerned to Grand Ls are too big for my lot but I love their capabilities. Maybe if I got one with turfs I'll be okay. Funny thing is on paper the Deere 3x20 aren't that much smaller than the Grand Ls but they sure seem it in person. ....

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bongowu
Join Date: Aug 2008
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2008-08-29          156404


I use my 3400 for mostly loader work and yes if the grass is really wet the R4's will tear up the yard but if you go with the turf tires you'll end up spinning and doing more damage anyway. One of my friends has a kubota riding mower and it leaves ruts if the ground is to wet. I looked at the grand models and just couldn't justify spending an extra 5,000 for some bells and whistles. The only complaint that I have is that i keep trying to pick up things that are way to heavy. Not the tractors fault I should have bought an excavator. I was just so impressed by the capabilities that I push it to the max and sometimes it complains. 100000% satisfied and will be buying another when I finally destroy this one. :)

On another note it took me 4 months and going into the building department shouting to get my permits passed. Don't give a second thought about asking to talk to the supervisor in charge. Most of the counter people do everything they can to try and make your life miserable. ....

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jimskubota
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2 upstate NY
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2008-09-04          156500


Hi Chris, I have a Kubota B7800 HST, it works great. I am doing something simliar to what you are doing also, but on the East Coast. I bought 10 acres of land in the mountains of up state NY. Had three acres forested to build a house and for the last year I have been cleaning up the mess they left, tree tops, stumps , dead or rotten trunks. I am down to my last 9 or ten stumps now. The Kubota hasn't failed to amaze me. the BH75 back hoe handles almost any stump up to about 18 inches in diameter. Digging is not the issue, it is getting the stumps out of the hole you dig. In the last 18 months that I have owned my Kubota, I got about 300+ hours on it. I was brand new to this when I started, but the more you do the better you get. As far as tires go, I have the R4 and they are loaded for extra traction. I have had no problems with them including blowing snow, but because of the weight of the tire they can cause rutting when the ground is soft. I plan to get a mower once I finish landscaping. But I do have a smaller riding tractor for that also, so it will a toss of the coin in which I use to mow with. Once concern could be if you have a septic system, the Kubota could be a little heavy to go over the leech field. Hope this helps. PS the only problem that I had was a bent bucket cylinder rod, I replaced it with the upgrade actuator. they increased the rod dia. by 5mm. ....

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