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4 out of 5 neighbors

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DRankin
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 5111 Northern Nevada
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2006-08-17          133442


Preferred John Deere Tractors..........


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4 out of 5 neighbors

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kthompson
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 5223 South Carolina
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2006-08-18          133446


reckon so, look at all the orange already there. The unusual always get the quick look. LOL ....

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4 out of 5 neighbors

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Murf
Join Date: Dec 1999
Posts: 7155 Toronto Area, Ontario, Canada
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2006-08-18          133447


I'm not sure if they prefer Greene tractors....

Or were merely hungry and attracted by *anything* that was green.

Maybe they figured if they pooped enough around it the fertilizer would make it grow? LOL

BEst of luck. ....

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4 out of 5 neighbors

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DRankin
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 5111 Northern Nevada
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2006-08-18          133450


Actually they were licking the rust out of the loader bucket.

They were so interested in that rust they let me get within about 8 feet of them. ....

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4 out of 5 neighbors

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Chief
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 4285 Southwest MiddleTennessee
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2006-08-18          133451


Mark,

It looks like you have been working with your neighbors. I am surprised they let you get that close to get a picture. Looks like they are well fed. Any chance you might one day get a halter and lead rope on one? ;O) ....

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4 out of 5 neighbors

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DRankin
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 5111 Northern Nevada
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2006-08-18          133454


Put a rope on a sacred wild horse?

Good greif..... That would be like shooting a wolf in Montana or eating a chunk of beef in India.

Probably end up in jail. It is against the law to even offer them food.

....

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4 out of 5 neighbors

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Chief
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 4285 Southwest MiddleTennessee
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2006-08-18          133456


I wasn't aware that it was illegal to feed them or catch them. BLM rounds them up and sells them periodically. The picture in the adding hp thread makes them look like they are pretty well fed. Looked kinda like they were eating some goodies from your FEL bucket. I bet you could make REAL good buddies with them with a few bags of "Mare and Foal" 16% sweet feed. ;O) ....

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4 out of 5 neighbors

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DRankin
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 5111 Northern Nevada
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2006-08-18          133457


I am not a horse guy, but my understanding is that they are so used to the wild forage that you could make them pretty sick by giving them high powered food that would be normal fare for domesticated horses.

We have several Russian olive trees on the property. When the olives are ripe they strip everything they can reach. Just as well as the olives are not really harvestable, but we do have to race the horses to the apples or we get none.

....

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4 out of 5 neighbors

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Murf
Join Date: Dec 1999
Posts: 7155 Toronto Area, Ontario, Canada
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2006-08-18          133458


Mark, you are absolutely right about the food.

Horses, along with other related animals like deer and moose, have a digestive system which is highly adaptable, but takes time to do so. This is why deer & moose for example, can live off tree bark and twigs in the winter when nothing else is available.

In my area they have a big problem with people feeding deer in the winter when they think the deer are 'starving' and need the handout. Since we live in a rural suburb of a big city, we are in 'horse country' and hay is easy to come by. The result is people feeding hay to deer in mid-winter when they can't digest it. Killing them with kindness as it were.

There was a big fuss in the media locally here 2 years ago because the Natural Resources people charged a local lady with "interfering with wildlife" and "causing cruelty to wildlife resulting in death" after she refused to stop feeding deer hay out of her backyard. When the CO's started poking around they found a recently deceased deer a short distance from her place in a small yard the deer used.

It was dead of malnutrition and was bloated from all the hay in it's belly. It had eaten so much hay that it could not digest, that the deer literally starved to death because it was too full to eat anything else.

The local animal rights people quickly took up her cause, but dropped her like a hot potatoe once the facts came out.

Depending on where you and what animals you have, a fortified salt lick (added minerals and stuff), and providing clean water might be in order, but nothing more.

Best of luck. ....

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4 out of 5 neighbors

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kthompson
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 5223 South Carolina
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2006-08-18          133460


Dr,

I have been about as good as long as I can be but you wrote it,

you say this is a "rusted bucket"? Still looks good. LOL

....

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4 out of 5 neighbors

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DRankin
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 5111 Northern Nevada
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2006-08-18          133461


It sat in the rain, filled with water and rusted the inside.

I keep the forks on the tractor 90 percent of the time.

I wonder why they like to lick rust. Must taste salty? ....

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4 out of 5 neighbors

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bvance
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 280 The Great Pacific NorthWet, Olympia, WA
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2006-08-19          133472


Wild horses (mustangs) are a very interesting and beautiful animal.

I'm originally from Owyhee County Idaho, just north a hundred miles or so from where Mark lives. I was raised on a cattle ranch and we used to "run" wild horses, catch them and cull the herds. Some of the nicer composition horses we kept, broke them and used them.....if they were young enough.

Many folks thought this to be cruel punishment to the horses to catch them and cull the herds.....that's why it is now outlawed. After the BLM would not allow us ranchers to cull the herds, they employed helicopters to do the same thing we did because certain parts of their range became over grazed and some of the mustangs were dying. The problem with the government is they always screw something up the private sector had long since figured out. When the government did the culling they culled just by numbers and the good stock was usually taken, leaving weaker, poorer genetics and the herds then really went down hill.

We always culled the weaker ones and left the good stock to keep the genetics strong. When we did it, it didn't cost the government anything. They tried to do it, screwed it up and costs them (us)millions. They adopted some of the wild mustangs out and that too ended up being a disaster because many folks that got the adopted mustangs, did not know how to take care of them and they suffered a slow, ugly death. Others sold them illegally causing even more problems.

The ranchers knew what they were doing because they had done this for many, many years. Mustangs made good work horses. We used several in our pack string for elk hunting. They were very sure footed, had very strong endurance, if not a bit head-strong at times.

Back before the BLM got involved (in the 60's and early 70's) the mustangs were truly wild animals where I lived. You could not get within a mile or so from them before they started moving out. We knew the country and would haze them into box canyons and such, rope them and load them into trucks. They were not much different than roping a mule deer (done that too). They were truly wild and beautiful animals. Another part of the West that has gradually changed.

The mustangs are still with us and in some parts of Southern Idaho, Northern Nevada and Eastern Oregon, which is all very remote, rugged, beautiful high country desert(up to 10,000 feet high)there are still a few remnants of theses herds that are still truly wild animals. There are also still a few honest to goodness cattle rancher left in this corner of the world and God Bless them. They know how to take care of the land (despite what the government would say), work incredibly hard and long hours and do the same thing ranchers did the same way, a hundred years ago. The term of endearment they use for each other is buckaroo. If someone were to say, "Now there's a good buckaroo, that was the best compliment a rancher could give or get. They're not a cowboy, they're a buckaroo.

I hope we never lose them....the mustangs or the buckaroos.

Brian ....

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