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Kubota B6000 won t start

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19thHole
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3 NH
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster

2007-10-10          146780


Ran out of diesel fuel, re-fueled and vented air from the fuel filter, then tried to vent air from the injection pump but no fuel came out. Tried to start it, but he engine just turns over. Any suggestions as to what to try next?

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Kubota B6000 won t start

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candoarms
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1932 North Dakota
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster  View my Photos  Pics

2007-10-11          146785


19thhole,

You've done everything correctly so far, but there are usually a few other things you can try, and most of the time these tricks work.

First off, you've done nothing to hurt the tractor. You've simply ran out of fuel, which is a bugger to resolve in some cases.

With the bleeder vent open on the injection pump, try pressurizing the fuel tank with a slight amount of air pressure. You can do this using a nearly empty air bomb. (5lbs of air is more than enough. Don't use high pressure air.) Stick the air bomb hose in the fuel tank, and then seal the fuel tank opening around the hose, using a damp rag. (Not soaking wet!)

Once you have the tank opening sealed around the hose, you can then open the valve on the air bomb. (You will have to remove the tire valve on the end of the hose.) You may need a second pair of hands to help you with this procedure.

With a slight amount of air pushing the fuel through the lines, you should be able to see fuel squirting out of the injection pump. Once you see fuel coming out of the injector pump, close the bleeder valve and then try starting the tractor. It might take a while. You may have to turn it over for about a minute. Do not overheat your starter. Let the starter cool down for about 5 minutes between attempts.

Diesel engines are a pain in the butt when they run out of fuel. Preventing this problem is a whole lot easier than curing it.

Joel
....

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Kubota B6000 won t start

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Murf
Join Date: Dec 1999
Posts: 7209 Toronto Area, Ontario, Canada
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster  View my Photos  Pics

2007-10-11          146801


Just to elaborate on what Joel said, because it doesn't sound like you've done this before.

Kubotas are pretty good at starting after they've been run dry.

One thing you didn't mention, but is critical, is that you have to both open a line slightly, and crank the engine over in order to get the injection pump primed, and the air out of the lines between the pump and injectors.

Sometimes a good shot of WD40 directly into the air intake will be enough to back the engine fire up. It only takes a second of the engine running to do what seems like forever cranking over on the starter motor.

Just be aware, do not ever use ether or conventional 'quick start' products on a diesel engine, it's way to easy to do serious damage to the engine if it gets too much.

Best of luck. ....

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Kubota B6000 won t start

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19thHole
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3 NH
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster

2007-10-14          146980


Joel-Thank for the advice, didn't know what a tire bomb was so I used a wet vac and everything worked as you said. Thanks for the help!

john ....

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____________________________________________________________________________________
Kubota B6000 won t start

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19thHole
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3 NH
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster

2007-10-14          146981


Murf - Thanks for your advice everything worked fine and she started right up and is ready for the snow next month.

john from 19thhole ....

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Kubota B6000 won t start

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candoarms
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1932 North Dakota
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster  View my Photos  Pics

2007-10-15          146983


John,

Glad to hear you got it going, and you're very welcome.

An air bomb is nothing more than a portable air tank.

When an air compressor isn't available, the portable tank can be used to fill tires in a remote area.

I might have used a term common to my neck of the woods, leaving you completely in the dark. I apologize.

I'm happy to know that a shop vac will work. Thanks for that bit of information.

And just to add something to this conversation...........

Winter is coming. It's not a good idea to allow your fuel tank to get too low during the winter. Keep your fuel tank as full as possible at all times during the winter months.

Due to the expansion and contraction of the air inside the fuel tank, it will draw air when it cools off at night.......and along with that air comes the moisture, or humidity, in the air. When this moisture condensates, it will cause water to pool up in your fuel tank, and eventually there will enough water to cause your fuel lines to freeze up.

To prevent this problem, it is necessary to prevent any air from entering the tank during the cooling hours each evening. By keeping the tank full of fuel, very little air can be drawn in......hence, no water in the fuel tank, and no frozen fuel lines.

The side benefit, of course, is that you'll never have to worry about running out of fuel again, either.

Joel ....

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