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 11-28-2001, 22:59 Post: 33508
Eric Edwards



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 dealing with bent draft links

I have a couple of bent draft links from the 3PH of a JD 1070 to fix. One is probably out 5" or so and the other one an inch or better. The bend occurs mostly at the point where the sway chain attaches to the link. JD has put hole though the link at this point for attachment. I also have a broken sway chain which led to bent forks on the lift links and a 30 degree bend in the threaded rod portion of the adjustable lift link. I consulted my JD dealer and he said that if I cold bent them back without then anealing and then heat treating them that they could snap. Is he pulling my leg? He scared me into ordering a replacement for the worse one. Is there a good method for dealing with this. If I cold bend or bang (read 10lb sledge) them back does any one know what kind of strength I'd be losing if any? Anyone out there an expert at this metalurgy stuff. Oh; and if you have two friends who want to drag their old truck out of the woods with your machine and logging winch, in your abscence, just say NO!






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 11-29-2001, 06:20 Post: 33511
TomG

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 dealing with bent draft links

The last sentence is a killer. I was wondering how they got bent. I think what your dealer said is right. Some of the risk would depend on the type of steel the arms are made of. I don't know if the arms are alloy, high carbon or mild steel. The risks are greater if the arms are made from a heat-treated alloy.

The following notes are off the top of my head. I'd never claim expertise, or even much knowledge about metallurgy. All steel has a crystalline structure. The type and size of the structure depends on the type steel and how it was processed during manufacture. The structure in a cast part is large and angular, so they break rather than bend. Mild steels and 'worked' steels have a finer structure that allows them to bend. 'Worked' usually means a forming process such as rolling or forging.

The crystalline structure of part changes when it is bent; and straightening a part doesn't restore the structure. Fracture lines and internal stresses may still exist. Actually, I'd go one step further than your dealer and say that simply straightening, heating and cooling a part may not restore it's original structural integrity. The annealing (fancy word for cooling would likely relieve internal stresses though). Basically, a part has to be 're-worked' to ensure that the original structure is restored.

Working steel can be done hot or cold. However, cold working takes much more pressure and time than hot working, which is why blacksmiths have forges and anvils. I think it's safe to say that cold working a part with the cross section of a link arm would require a huge anvil and a power hammer. When working steel by forging, it's the pressure created between the hammer face and anvil surface that counts. It's not just banging something to straight it out. Repairing the arms probably would be a simple job for a blacksmith, but a forge and good anvil would be needed.






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 11-29-2001, 08:46 Post: 33516
Murf



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 dealing with bent draft links

My first reaction is "Doooooo" as Homer Simpson puts it so eloquently. Secondly I think my neighbour Tom is on the right track, the molecular structure of that type of steel is such that it allows flex, but is NOT supposed to allow bending, kind of like a leaf spring does. I would suggest that if they have bent very much they should be replaced, there will undoubtedly be structural changes (read weak spots) in those arms now, the only way to tell how much is (short of Magnafluxing or similar NDT or Non Destructive Testing, which would probably cost more than the replacements) after they break. If you use (as you mentioned) a high load implement like a skidding winch, thats probably not the best, or safest thing. Buy two new arms, hand your 'friends' the bill and I bet they won't even be TEMPTED to do it again. Best of luck.






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 11-29-2001, 10:51 Post: 33523
Eric Edwards



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 dealing with bent draft links

Thanks for the replies. I picked up a copy of "New Edge of the Anvil" by Jack Andrews and it basically said what both of you have written. Even if I were to heat this arm up to anneal it, then straighten, harden and temper it, the process will probably increase the size of the grain structure and thus weaken the bar. I'm not sure I've got it exactly right but I agree with you both that it probably won't be close to what it was. I don't know the type of steel but it looks cold formed. As far as purchasing a replacement for the second link which is out a lot less, I may run it the way it is and not try to straighten it. I can't see that this link would actually break but I'm all ears. I actually feel lucky that they didn't rip my top arms right out of the rear hyd assembly. I've been pulling 29' 36" dia at the butt red oak stumpage out to saw up timbers and never bent anything. On a corner the log(attached with one choker) will pivot where it hits against the lower shovel part of the winch. Aparently, they attached the back bumper tight to the winch with two chains instead of just towing it out with one long one. Of course, the first sharp corner they took they must have snapped the sway chain as there if no way those parts could handle trying to swing what they were pulling. As they continued pulling, the winch must have assumed a very odd angle, bending the rest of the components shearing cotter pins on the fork of the lift link on one side. My bill so far for parts is over $400. and another link would add $285. This includes replacing all four sway chains for peace of mind. This doesn't include my lost time or going to pick up the tractor and being surprised by all the damage. They didn't even know! Also, I am using studded ice chains on the rear which gave them plenty of power and no slip. Now I'm venting ! Thanks again for you imput.






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 11-29-2001, 11:15 Post: 33527
Art White



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 dealing with bent draft links

I hope you charged enough rent to cover the damages.






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 11-29-2001, 11:56 Post: 33528
BillBass



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 dealing with bent draft links

If you know of someone (or maybe a local shop) with a hydraulic press, you could probably at least get them bent back to near normal shape so that every thing lines up correctly. That would be easier and more accurate than banging on them with a hammer.






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 11-29-2001, 14:02 Post: 33529
steve arnold



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 dealing with bent draft links

I bent my adjustable lower link screw as you mentioned, mine
has the spider gear hand crank. I was crossing a small ditch
with my 2-16 reset plow attached (A little heavy for a 970)
as the plow caught the edge of the first bank and my rear tire
went down in the ditch something had to give.

If it's not too late, I would suggest buying the same adjustable
link assembly used on the 990. It looks stronger, simpler, and should
be a direct install.

BTW, Mine is welded up solid now with heavy wall tube stock. This is ok
but I had to put it in float mode to help connect implements.






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 11-29-2001, 21:02 Post: 33537
bullworker



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 dealing with bent draft links

my experience with parts of this nature has been to work them back with a press.the type of bend has a lot to do with how much strength will be lost in the piece. a long gradual bend can usually be taken out without much loss of strength , a sharp bend that has stretched the grain of the steel is a little harder to repair if at all, and there will be some loss of strength but still may be ok if used properly. some caution should be used when pressing steel that may be hardened but since these have already bent and not broke it should be ok to attempt to straighten them . hardened steel can shatter and cause injuries.






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 11-29-2001, 22:51 Post: 33538
Roger L.



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 dealing with bent draft links

I am going against the grain here, but I don't see a problem with a repair. First of all, the chains and chain terminations are probably a high strength steel, so they won't repair well. They have done their job and should be replaced. The rest of the parts 3pt parts that you mention are likely to be a mild steel and can be heated, bent, and rebent without any problem at all. Mild steel is easy to work and forgiving. Loss of strength will be minimal. There isn't any reason to use high priced alloy or heat treatable steels in those areas. Mild steel is good enough for those parts and if the member isn't strong enough, the designer will use more mild steel rather than go to an higher yield strength and higher cost type. After all, he isn't constrained by weight or space limitations....which are the main reasons for going to a specialty steel. Besides, even if it turns out to be HS steel, any half-way decent welding shop can quickly tell you which parts are of steel that they can work and how to do it. Loss of strength would be through cracking and this is easily seen when hot. And even if there are cracks the welder can partner in some steel to beef it up. This is a tractor; not a piano. I just do not see this type of a repair as a problem.






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 11-30-2001, 08:23 Post: 33547
TomG

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 dealing with bent draft links

Roger: I really don't think you're going against the grain (great potential for a dumb pun here). I believe what you say is true in the case of mild steels, and lift arms probably are mild steel. I think automotive steering parts also are mild steel, because as you say it is forgiving stuff. I think the value of this type of discussion is that it illustrates the risks of repair. Mild steel as well as any other develops fracture lines and break rather than bend.

I have the sense that repair is most likely feasible, but should be done be a shop that really knows what they are doing. One of the original repair ideas seemed to be along the lines of banging the arm out straight; then heating it up and letting it cool. I think there'd be agreement that such a repair wouldn't be adequate. Trouble is that a good repair like you described might cost about as much as a new part unless a person could do it themselves. For myself, I 'd probably buy a new one. There are likely people in my area that could do the repair adequately, but I don't know who they are.

Anyway, I might over-react to issues like this. I think I mentioned some years back that I witnessed several fatalities when a truck went off the old highway over Loveland Pass--west of the summit (I figure you've been there). It turned out to be the result of a welded tie-rod. It made a lasting impression on me, and I tend to avoid home-grown repairs in critical applications. I think that any discussions that illustrates the risks of things, and that adequate repairs often require equipment and skills that ordinary owners lack are good.






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Tractor Engine Repair Rebuild Forum

Thread 33508 Filter by Poster:
Art White 1 | BillBass 1 | bullworker 1 | Eric Edwards 4 | Murf 2 | Roger L. 2 | steve arnold 2 | TomG 2 |

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