Diesel Noise Levels: Just For Fun Off Topic  -- Current Events Health Happiness Discussion Forum and Review Diesel Noise Levels: Just For Fun Off Topic -- Current Events Health Happiness Discussion Forum

  parts   |   manuals   |   discussion   |   photos   |   podcast   |   reviews   |   specs   |   dealers   |   classifieds   |   contact   |   faq   |   myProfile   |   home          Login Now | Sign Up


FAQ:   What is a tractor?

Forum Index

Kubota Tractors
  Kubota News
  Kubota Price
  Kubota Review
John Deere Tractors
  John Deere News
  John Deere Price
  John Deere Review
New Holland Tractors
  New Holland Tractor Price
  New Holland Tractor Revie
Other Tractor Brands
  Articulated Tractors
  Belarus
  Bobcat Tractors
  Case
  Cub Cadet
  Hinomoto
  Kioti Tractor
  Long
  Massey Ferguson
  Mitsubishi
  Other Tractor Brands
  Other Tractor News
  Shibaura
  Yanmar Tractors
Lawn and Garden Tractors
  Craftsman
  Cub Cadet Garden
  John Deere Garden
  Kubota Lawn Garden
  Other Garden Tractors
  Simplicity
  Toro Wheelhorse
  Ventrac Lawn Tractors
Antique Tractors
  Allis Chalmers
  Case David Brown
  Farmall IHC
  Ford
  Ford 9N 2N 8N
  Fordson
  Harry Ferguson
  John Deere Older
  Massey-Harris Ferguson
  Minneapolis Moline
  Oliver Cletrac Cockshutt
  Restoration
  Tractor Pulling
Tractor Attachments Implements 3ph
  Back Hoe
  Field Mowers Brush Cutter
  Grooming Mowers Finish Mo
  Loaders
  Snowblowers / Snow Plows
  Tillers and Ploughs
  Tractor Implements
  Trenchers
  Wood Chippers 3PH
Tractor Maintenance
  Diesel Fuel Lubrication E
  Tractor Engine Repair Reb
  Tractor Tires
Utility ATV
  All Terrain Vehicles
  John Deere Gator
  Mule Utility Vehicles
General Tractor
  Farming Ranching Agricult
  Photo Contest
  Size Tractor Needed
  Tractor Projects
  Tractor Safety
  Welding
Chinese Tractors
  Jinma Farmpro Agracat
  NorTrac Tractors
  Other Chinese Tractors
Cars
  All Brands
  Audi VW
  BMW
  Car Tires and Maintenance
  Chrysler
  Exotic, Sports, Racing
  Ford Cars
  General Motors
  Honda
  Hyundai
  Mercedes
  News
  Nissan
  Subaru
  SUV and Trucks
  Toyota Cars
Trucks Trailers
  Chevy Pickup Trucks
  Dodge Pickup Trucks
  Ford Pickup Trucks
  Toyota Pickup Trucks
  Chevy Pickup Trucks
  Dodge Pickup Trucks
  Ford Pickup Trucks
  Toyota Pickup Trucks
Home Building
  Alternate Electric Energy
  Barns Pole Barns
  Buying Ranch Farm Acreage
  Carpentry
  Contractors
  Electric
  Excavation
  Moldings Finish Trim
  Other Home Building
  Pellet Stoves
  Plumbing
  Wood Stoves
Tools
  Electirc Power Tools
  Gas Power Tools
  Generators
  Shop Tools
  Techniques Howto
Landscape
  Flowers Shrubs Garden
  Golf Course Maintenance
  Irrigation Systems
  Landscape Design
  Landscape Lighting
  Landscape Maintenance
  Lawn, Turf, and Grass
  Vegetable Gardening
Construction
  Caterpillar
  Komatsu
  Wheel Loaders
Current Events Health Happiness
  Current Events
  Dogs and other Pets
  Electronics And Computers
  Food
  Health
  Just For Fun Off Topic
  Movies Music Games
  Personal Finance Investme
  Sports Outdoors
Tractorpoint Site
  Member Photos
  Site Members
  Website Operations Howto


New As Posted | Active Subjects



Click to Post a New Message!

Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Just For Fun Off Topic Forum

Page [ 1 ] |
Reply | Pop Up Window Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo
 03-18-2002, 15:54 Post: 36476
TomG

TP Contributor

Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Upper Ottawa Valley
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 5406

3
Filter by User
 Diesel Noise Levels

Just a note that might be of interest to some people.

I accidentally ran across a simple sound spectrum analyzer I used back in the sound buz days. I got curious about the sound curve for my Ford 1710. I had to remove some late March snow today so I analyzed my diesel noise. The results are below.

Ford 1710 Sound Level Curve (Not weighted) @ PTO RPM Unloaded

HZ DB
______________________________________________

31.5 92.5
63 95
125 97.5
250 95
500 92.5
1K 90
2K 90
4K 87.5
8K 85
16K 85

The sound was measured from the operator's seat outside, under a steel canopy and using the slow reading position on the analyzer. Slow readings can be interpreted as 'continuous levels.' Slow readings may miss some higher short-term sound levels.

The levels are generally around 90DB, which is high enough to cause hearing damage if exposed for prolonged periods. The curve is loaded at the low frequency end, which might be expected. However, I did expect to see one of the higher frequency bands peaked up due to diesel pinging. However, even without peaks at higher frequencies, there's still plenty of sound energy in the 2k - 4k range, which is range that is most damaging to hearing.

It's a little difficult to interpret DB figures. 70 DB is about the level of normal speech at say 3'. Sound levels decrease according to an inverse square law and loose 6 DB if the distance from a sound source is doubled. The tractor is about 20DB above speech levels but it also is much richer in high frequencies.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us |
 03-18-2002, 19:37 Post: 36480
DRankin



View my Photos

View my Photos  Pics
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Northern Nevada
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 5105
 Diesel Noise Levels

Wow Tom, cool numbers. Now you can help us nimnals. Do we need hearing protectors? Fifty some years on the planet, a couple hundred hours in little airplanes and hundreds more teaching police recruits to shoot has left me no hearing that I can spare. If you know, can you recommend a level of hearing protection? Foam plugs? Big mouse ears?






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us |
 03-19-2002, 06:12 Post: 36489
TomG

TP Contributor

Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Upper Ottawa Valley
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 5406

3
Filter by User
 Diesel Noise Levels

Most of my hearing loss came from being a musician and live sound engineer. I had a set of linear 15DB custom mineral fiber plugs made to protect myself while engineering.

I wear the custom plugs when on the tractor. They are good for sound engineering because they don't colour what you hear too much. Foam, including 'clam shell' types, sop up higher frequencies and make everything sound muddy but they also provide around 30db of cut. Of course, the higher frequencies are what cause most hearing damage so maybe they should be sopped up except for sound engineering.

The question with foam plugs is whether an operator can hear everything they need to hear. Relief valves, set parking brakes and failing bearing all make high frequency sounds that might be missed. It's sort of a matter of personal preference. I use my 15DB plugs because I don't like muddy sound, but the 20DB version of these plugs may be preferable. Foam would provide better hearing protection. However, I do use the clam shells on my chain saw hat when chain sawing. I figure there's nothing much I want to hear then anyway.

There’s no good way to say how much damage a several hour exposure to 90DB of broad spectrum sound will cause for a particular individual. Hearing protection is a good idea for all equipment operators though--the damage sort of sneaks up on you. It is cumulative and irreversible over a lifetime, although I think recently developed surgical implants can make improvements. Incidentally, some outdoor stadiums impose max 90DB sound-level limits at the rear of audience areas. I’m not sure if the concern is with hearing damage or with noise complaints from near by residents.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us |
 03-19-2002, 08:33 Post: 36494
MarkS



Join Date:
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1
 Diesel Noise Levels

TomG, you bring up a good point with failing componets while wearing hearing protection. I Usually, and I must say usually, wear some form of hearing protection if I know I'm gonna be out mowing etc for the day. But, it is a little annoying to not be able to hear the tractor while you are working. I periodically remove the earplugs/headphones etc just so I can hear what is going on with the machine. It takes some getting use to using hearing protection and a little faith that your machine is in good working order and hopefully nothing is gonna fail. But all in all I'm sure your better off in the long run.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us |
 03-19-2002, 19:47 Post: 36504
Clemson



Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: South Carolina
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 13
 Diesel Noise Levels

I find the EAR foam plugs very comfortable to wear for extended periods. I, too, am a shooting instructor, so it is important to protect what I have left. I wear both plugs and earmuffs when I shoot handguns. The plugs alone are sufficient for my Massey Ferguson tractor. My machine, by the way, has the exhaust routed out low, below the transmission. Have any of you compared a low mounted exhaust to an identical tractor with a conventional stack going up in front of the operator?






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us |
 03-20-2002, 07:10 Post: 36527
TomG

TP Contributor

Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Upper Ottawa Valley
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 5406

3
Filter by User
 Diesel Noise Levels

I story I may have spun here before is about middle-ear muscles. They are the fastest muscles in the body and act as compressors to protect against high sound levels. They also act whenever a person speaks. That's why babies and drill instructors don't go deaf. It's also why artillerymen say 'ahhhhh' before firing.

These muscles aren't completely quick and don't protect against high-energy transients of which there are plenty in shooting. Unlike artillerymen, riflemen can't say 'ahhhh' all the time, so shooter’s muffs are good.

After exposure to continuous high sound levels for awhile these muscles stop releasing. They are still providing protection, but that's the reason why everything seems so quite during breaks at loud concerts and the band can start up again and it doesn’t seem so loud. After longer exposure, these muscles just give up and stop providing much protection. That's when serious hearing damage starts. There can be injuries and overuse syndromes to these muscles just like any other muscle. People who mention having felt swollen and burning ears after concerts are reporting something like an athletic injury.

A conclusion is that's it's best to leave hearing protectors on when operating equipment or when sound engineering. However, the body's own protection usually is available if the protectors are removed for short periods. It is a little tough to keep protectors on if you think you're missing something. It's especially tough in sound engineering because you can end up with an audience that has a bad time. Plugs are almost impossible when playing live because the stage sound is loud but absolutely terrible in many places.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us |
Reply | Pop Up Window Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo


Page [ 1 ] |

Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Just For Fun Off Topic Forum

Thread 36476 Filter by Poster:
Clemson 1 | DRankin 1 | MarkS 1 | TomG 3 |

 (advanced search)

Picture of the Day
jssihs

Tractor Implements - Pull type box blades
Pull type box blades


Unanswered Questions

Shibaura SD2203 rear axle oil
Mitsubishi MX55
Gator HPX ignition module
SL 1643
Removing LHS rear wheel beari
Gear Grinding 1200A - primary
Replacing a friction diskwashe
Bolens k1502 mitsubishi K3 ove


Active Subjects

Big country 4x2 utility vehicl
Operation
lift cylinder for 3pt hitch wo
Still have jerk in hydro
Flatulent gifts human and dog
front mount snowblower
Hydraulics Won t Work
4210 ehydro codes


Hot Topics

NorTrac Tractor Quality Review
Case 446 hydraulic pump
Long 460 hydraulic problem
Jinma Tractor w transmission p
Flatulent gifts human and dog
Generator set up ideas wanted
6X4 Gator Sometimes Shudders
Roof VP75 Brush Mower Manual


Featured Suppliers

Mountain Creek Labradoodles
      MountainCreekLabradoodles.com





New Forums on Gun Sport Shooting and Hunting -- BarrelPoint.com  New Forums on Horses ManePoint.com
Talk Horses at ManePoint
Hunting + Gun Sports at BarrelPoint



Most Viewed

+ Need input on building a pneumatic mulch blower
+ Two-Cylinder John Deere Engines
+ one theory on Jobs
+ -17 degrees F
+ Bad River Tractor Tool Rack
+ Vandalism or Civil Matter
+ Joke o the day
+ Merry Christmas
+ OLIVER 1900 FWD
+ Tractor Umbrella Canopy Sunshade Question

Most Discussion

+ -17 degrees F
+ New Implements
+ one theory on Jobs
+ WHAT DID YOU DO TODAY
+ Empire farm days
+ Vandalism or Civil Matter
+ Shooting at Mall in Kingston
+ Joke o the day
+ A thought-provoking eye-opener
+ Hey Randy You are going to

Newest Topics

+ Things we say and what do they mean REALLY
+ Smile for the day Ole and Swen and others
+ Too much Snow Too Soon for me
+ Happy Thanksgiving
+ Commuting 335 miles to work
+ I m back
+ Some weather related news from North Dakota
+ How did you wind up where you are living Survey
+ How Did that happen
+ Super Bowl or Ice Bowl or Who Cares Bowl
















Turbochargers for Tractors and Industrial Machines
Cab Glass for Tractors and Industrial Machines

Alternators for Tractors and Industrial Machines
Radiators for Tractors and Industrial Machines

Driveline Components for Tractors and Industrial Machines
Starter Motors for Tractors and Industrial Machines