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Compact 101 How big is too big

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TimB
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 31 Southwest PA
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2002-06-03          39268


Hi,

Very sorry for the *long* post but new member here, looking for some sizing and "Compact Tractor 101" advice. My wife and I are planning to take over and build a new home on a piece of (ex-farm) property in her family. There will be a lot of work to put it in and maintain it the condition we'd like and we'd certainly have to have some type of tractor to assist.

Details - roughly 25 acres total, 10 in woods, the rest in fields. (Actually currently still being farmed along with an adjacent 15 acres by a neighbor for feed crops including corn). Several small ponds/wet areas that come and go based on weather. No terribly steep slopes that we'd need to work with. (The steep stuff's in the woods).

My inlaws use an old Ford NAA with a 5 or 6 foot 3ph Woods for field mowing on this and other property and some garden plowing/disking tasks now. However we would need our own equipment to take on the jobs we foresee. I'm thinking of of 3 basic "windows" to do the work involved.

Stage 1-Basic caretaking now - mostly field mowing - especially when it is no longer under cultivation.

Stage 2-"Heavy" landscaping over several years as we re-work the property. Converting old cornfields to lawn, orchard etc.,. Lot of fence rows need re-newed, tree planting, terracing, cutting a (1000 foot) driveway, pond cleanup/maintenance, brush-hogging. Foundation excavation for various outbuildings as time goes by.

Stage 3-Maintenance of the "finished" property. We'd end up with probably 4-5 acres in "lawn", a couple in orchards, a couple in gardens. (Partly for my wife's herb business) and the rest would be basic field mowing as we slowly re-forest certain areas, and some basic path maintenance/clean up in the woods. And not to be forgotten, snow removal and other maintenance on that 1000 feet of driveway. (SW PA)

I was originally thinking to get an small, older tractor, say a Farmall Super A/C/100/200 sized tractor. I like the simplicity, ease of maintenance, the heritage, and to be honest, the price - especially compared to a new compact. However the more I've read and thought through the "job descriptions" the more I've become convinced that would be the wrong horse for this course. Certainly it sounds like between FWD, more sophisticated PTOs, the hydraulic systems, power steering, manuverability, safety systems, quick-attach attachments etc., the modern compacts sound like a better fit. Probably want an FEL, post-hole digger, brush hog and some sort of "finish" mower. Would like a hoe but don't know about that considering the cost.

So finally my questions-

First - given all the rambling above - would I be asking too much of a "small" compact (say a TC29/33 or equiv.) or should I look more towards a "big" compact (TC40/JD4700 etc.) Is a bigger compact that's heavy enough for the landscaping too heavy for decent lawn work down the road? (Since the property is now a "clean sheet of paper", I'm free to avoid too many tight areas that might be overly cramped for a bigger tractor. Ditto the storage sizing.)

I won't say price is no object but if I can swallow 15K-16K for a smaller unit with basic attachments, 22K-24K isn't all that much worse. More important to get the right horse. Or am I asking too much of any one machine?

Second - since the most complicated tractor I've ever run is that old NAA and the mower - is there a good "primer" out there that would cover learning to use a new compact with all these wonderful but complex systems and accessories like FELs?

Third - what about hydrostatic with this type of use? My personal taste runs to basic gear trannys, but my wife would certainly prefer hydro, and it sound like that may be an advantage also in much FEL work. Again, I'm not familiar with running that level of equipment yet.

So whats the advice from the "seasoned" crowd out there?

Many thanks for your patience!
Tim

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Compact 101 How big is too big

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DavidJ
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 62 Alabama
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2002-06-03          39271


From the sounds of it, you've got your head around what's going to be required in this venture. I'm sure you'll get lots of advice on this subject, so I'll begin with mine.
From all the things you describe I would be comfortable with something in the the TC-33D/JD4310 range. It'll be large enough to handle the amount of "landscaping" you have indicated. You wouldn't be able to push it as hard as you could the larger machines but then, doing it yourself it's ok to go a bit slower. The reason I recommend this size is that, once you finish the heavy work, the majority of the work you'll do is mowing and/or snow removal and the smaller size will be better for that type of work yet large enough to handle the attachments.

As for using the machine and all it's newfangled equipment. You shouldn't have a problem figuring it out and using it.

I would definitely go for the Hydro. To me it makes a big difference in the operation of the tractor, especially mowing around obstacles, and it certainly impacts the WAF (Wife Approval Factor). ....

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BillMullens
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 649 Central West Virginia
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2002-06-03          39274


You won't have any trouble learning to use the modern tractors, but you'll definitely appreciate the newer convieniences. I have a standard tranny TC29 that I finish mow and landscape with; if it wasn't for the finish mowing, I'd like to have a frame size bigger. Though the compact size is an advantage working in the woods, too. Have you considered a 29/33 size (basically the same size as 9/2/8N) with turf tires for mowing and some landscaping, and a bigger tractor (NAA or 800 series Ford for example) with ag tires for the heavier pulling and brush cutting?
Bill ....

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TimB
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 31 Southwest PA
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2002-06-03          39278


Actually I was wondering about doing the opposite. Something like a TC40-size as the swiss-army knife and maybe getting a dedicated mower (on the lines of a ZTR front mower) for the "good" lawn.

I am concerned that the weight of a TC40 et al (especially with extra ballast, be it filled tires, wheel weights, the FEL or some combination of these) would be too much for mowing on "finished" areas. On the other hand the substantial difference in the FEL capacities between the smaller machines and the bigger end make me wonder if I'd be pushing a smaller tractor too hard for some of the earth-moving work.

I would not mind at all finding a legit excuse for an old John Deere or Farmall though.

Thanks for the info.
Tim ....

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TC33
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2002-06-03          39279


Go for the TC 33 with Super Steer.. add the turf tires and your set... it is like a super sized lawn mower and will do all the other jobs for you.. ....

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dsg
Join Date: Jun 1999
Posts: 528 Franklin, Maine
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2002-06-03          39281


TimB,
You're going to be doing some heavy earth moving if you are putting in a 1000' drive. I've built a 1000' road on my property, and do a little earth moving/Construction off & on with my JD4700. I have alot of time on my hands so taking my time is not a problem but I still couldn't imagine doing it with a smaller machine than the JD 45,46,4700 frame size. I also finish mow 2 1/2 acres around the house with the 4700, however I do not drive on the leachfield when the ground is not frozen. If, once all your heavy work is complete and all you will be doing is finish mowing and lite duty work on your property you can always sell the larger machine (for not much less than you paid for it) ((good resale value)) and buy a NEW smaller machine
with less attachments and be ahead of the game.

David ....

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Art White
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 6877 Waterville New York
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2002-06-04          39296


I'd like to have a dollar for every customer we have taken in trade a ford 8n or farmall A or the likes of and the people have been very happy with the L-3010 Kubota. You don't gain enough in horsepower or weight when you get that size chassis to make much difference as far as attachments you can use. ....

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Compact 101 How big is too big

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TomG
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 5406 Upper Ottawa Valley
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2002-06-04          39298


I have a couple of comments about size. The first is that the decision isn't as complex as it seems. Most of the size question is a tradeoff with the time required to do 'power work'--big and small do most of the same jobs. One approach is to decide the primary role of the tractor and then find one that will do the work in an acceptable time. Tractors sort of evolve into their roles. A tractor of any size will grab some bigger and smaller jobs outside its primary role. However, there always will be roles for small engine stuff and for contractors. Any size tractor will find its uses. Different sizes mostly change the mix of small engines and contractors it takes to get all the work done.

However, there are a couple of exceptions to this notion since every tractor does have practical limitations. Even with ballasting, a loader and a 3ph will only safely lift so much. If there is a need to move pallets of building material around, a small tractor just may not be able to lift some of them. If codes require trenching to a particular depth, the backhoe for a small tractor may not go that deep.

Iíd keep in mind that tractor and implement size go together. Usually trading tractor size means trading implements as well. If a tractorís primary role is finish mowing, and an especially high quality lawn is desired, then a small compact with a mid-mower probably would do the best job. As noted, a small tractor will do bigger jobs. However, a loader and mid-mower cannot be mounted simultaneously on some tractors. Thatís a lot of swapping MMMís and loaders if mowing and loader work alternates.
....

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LenK
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 6 Petersburg MI
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2002-06-04          39305


I bought a new TC40D last summer to use around the yard. I have 10 acres: 1 acre is pond, four acres mowed lawn and 5 acres woods. My TC40D has heavy duty front end loader with tooth bar. I have several attachments, including a 6 foot landscape box that I added two removable 160# weights to for ballast. I grade my 400' driveway, clean edges of my pond, clear brush, remove trees, plow driveways (Michigan winters) etc.

I do have a separate mower (61" Grasshopper) that does a great job mowing. Personally, if I was doing it over again I would buy exactly the same tractor and mower. I can do a good job mowing (and fast - mow 4 acres in 2 hours) and still have the power and equipment for everything else.

Although I miss my old Ferguson T020, I have to admit feeling that the TC40D is the best thing I have ever bought in my life. ....

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BKColeman
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 9 Virginia
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2002-06-04          39306


TimB,
I think you're right on the money with a TC40D and a ZTR later on. I'm very much in the same situation as you, new house on land that I'm improving. We bought 12 acres for our dream house, about 4 that is old pasture we're turning to lawn, 6.5 is wooded pasture we're turning to horse pasture, and the rest completely wooded. I bought a TC40D and have been most happy with it. It has the power to do all of the clearing and with SuperSteer, it is manuverable enough to mow.

I'm finish mowing with it right now and the yard looks great. In a couple of years I hope my yard has that golf course look to it and then I'll buy a ZTR mower for it, maybe. But I certainly don't have any complaints with it now. It looks as good as the neighbor's on his JD riding mower. I would agree to look at the large frame compacts for the work you have. If you're leaning toward NH, keep SuperSteer in mind.

--Brad ....

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TC33
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2002-06-04          39307


The one thing about a TC33 with SS compared to a TC40 with SS is that your TC40 will stand higher making it a challenge if you have trees that need mowing under. However, if you have a push mower or a ZTR or whatever you have been using to cut under the trees or around the trees a TC40 with SS is a GREAT DEAL. Another thing about a TC40 compared to a TC33... Your garage ceiling or door needs to be a bit higer to accomadate the ROP unless you fold it evertime you go into park it or have a nice size door to enter. With 15 ac pasture, trees, large driveway and yard "That looks like a golf course" the TC33 has done well... I tested the heck out of a TC40 and wanted one pretty bad until I tried to make it a combination lawn mower and compact util unit. The TC33 allows you to go around trees without having to buy a ZTR or push mower. Maybe a weedeater here and there.. I am sure a JD would be nice.. but the Super Steer you can't beat!! Can't tell you how nice it is to go into the woods and zip around the trees! ....

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BKColeman
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 9 Virginia
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2002-06-04          39311


TC33,
I think the TC33D is a great tractor and it is what I started out wanting. But I'm not so sure that it is that much better than the 40D for the things he's interested in. As far as height, there's only 7 inches of difference. Most trees I have are either evergreens which grow down much lower than my seat, or hardwoods where the branches are 15 feet or more. As far as garage doors, I've got 8' ones so I don't have to fold the ROPS, but if I had 7' doors, the TC33D wouldn't fit either w/o folding (87.8" tall according to NH's web site). So I don't believe height is a real consideration at all.

Now I do believe weight could be. A 40D is about 900lbs more if I remember correctly. But even on the lushest part of my yard (the part the contractors did as part of building my house), I haven't had any problems, and my rear tires are filled.

But there are other considerations. Lift capacity of the loaders for example. The 40D is rated for 2000lbs. The 33D w/ a 7308 is just over 1000. I posted some pics here a while back of my TC40D carrying a stump close to the size of the tractor, well over 1000 lbs. Also, the Class III Boomers have some options not available on Class II, the twin pedal design of the hydro, the dual-power HST, etc.

I'm not trying to put down the 33D at all, but just to point out that the 40D has some perks, with the only drawback possibly being its weight when finish mowing (but that is also an advantage when using ground engaging implements). I wouldn't try to talk anyone out of buying a TC33D, but I might point out why I would buy a 40D :-) Either way as long as it is blue! ....

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TimB
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 31 Southwest PA
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2002-06-04          39314


Great feedback all, many thanks. For another way for me to get a feel for the size/capabilities of these new compacts - can anyone with experience with tractors from both eras compare the modern NH Class II/III, or JD 4300-4700, etc., with close approximations from the "old" days?

I or families members have some experience with tractors like the Fords "N's" (9N/2N/8N/NAA) or letter-series and "hundred" series Farmalls, and that may help put some things in perspective. I appreciate that there are some very significant differences in the two eras - and the row crop roles the older ones were built for - but there ought to be some basic overall "grunt" and "stoutness" similiarities as well.

At this point I'd hazard a guess that despite the huge gap (on paper) in horsepower ratings (probably not so big a torque difference), a TC21/JD4100 is a modern "Cub", a TC29/JD4400 lines up to a Super A/100, and TC40/JD4500 is more like an NAA/Super C/200.

Or something like that. Comments?

Tim
....

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BillMullens
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 649 Central West Virginia
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2002-06-04          39318


Tim, just last week I got to compare an 8N to my TC29S in plowing and discing. The 8N has ag tires, unfilled, my TC has R4s, unfilled, and 4wd. I felt that the 8N was pulling the plow (single 14" or 16") better, but later, the TC had a clear advantage with the disc, even in 2wd. I didn't get to plow in the same garden with both tractors, so it's not really an apples to apples comparison. The old Ford spun quite a bit when discing. Proper ballasting would help, I'm sure, but then it would help my tractor, too. One thing about the N series, they won't go slow enough in some situations without the auxillary transmission. And the hydraulics only work when the PTO is engaged and the clutch is out - that takes some getting used to. I think that my tractor has spoiled me. I've used some Cubs and a '47 Farmall A quite a bit, but only for skidding logs and pulling trailers - not too much to compare.

I like your idea of getting the TC40 and a dedicated lawn mower later. I can only offer my opinion, but I frequently wish for a bigger/heavier tractor, and seldom wish for a smaller one. If I could get another one now, I'd pop for a bigger tractor with filled ag tires, especially for use with my backhoe, and get turf tires for my TC and use it for mowing.
Bill ....


Link:   Old tractors

 
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TimB
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 31 Southwest PA
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2002-06-05          39327


Bill,

Interesting info on the 8N. The Jubilee/NAA in the family is a tick heavier and longer, and a couple of hp stronger than the 8N (recently rebuild), but it has fairly new filled ag tires (calcium) and a homegrown front guard that probably adds a bit. No wheel or other weights. As a pure guess I'd put it's total weight today around 3500-3600 lbs. No Sherman creeper tranny. It has no problems whatsoever with the plow or disk used (well-worked ground), although to be honest I'm not quite sure how big these are. It's a 2-bottom plow used on this tractor, I'll have to pay more attention how big it and the disk are this weekend.

It's also used with a 3ph Woods finish mower on the next-to-the-"lawn" fields - and unless things are pretty wet doesn't seem to leave many marks behind. That and your results with the TC29 gives me some comfort level that something the size of a Class III Boomer, with fatter tires and more balanced weight distribution than the NAA shouldn't make too bad of a finish mower, yet still have the power when it's called for.

Questions - you running gears or hydro on the Boomer? Also - How would you compare the lower-speed bigger displacement gas engines on the "A" et al to the faster smaller new diesels for low-end grunt?

Thanks,
Tim

....

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Compact 101 How big is too big

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BillMullens
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 649 Central West Virginia
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2002-06-05          39331


Traction is the limiting factor in most of my experience with my TC29. It is a gear tractor. I didn't get the tires loaded because I mainly was to use it for a finish mower (with 3ph deck); since then we moved and I probably use it more for landscaping than mowing. I've never had the "A" or 801 in a pull with implements, only field mowed a bit with the 801 and pulled logs and trailers of firewood with the "A". I don't know if the difference is in power or in the governors being more responsive on the gasoline engines, I wish the TC opened up a bit sooner. Of course, the 801 is about 50 hp, so it really is in another league. I guess that I've actually stalled my TC once or twice, but usually it will lug down like it might stall, then the governor opens up and it keeps chugging. It does take some getting used to the little diesel - in my world, not as pleasant to listen to as the putt-putt-putt of the old iron, and diesel fumes are apparently an acquired taste. But it is extremely pleasant and easy to operate. The extendable 3 point hitch arms are worth their weight in gold; the live pto is great; the hydraulics have been trouble-free. I guess if money were no object I would have opted for the "D" model with hydro, but I used the money I saved to start building my backhoe, and am happy with that decision.
The only other tractor I could compare it to is a Massey 135 diesel. It has loaded ag tires, and just doesn't experience the traction difficulties I've seen with my TC. But I just couldn't imagine finish mowing with a tractor that big in this hilly country (WV).
Good luck!
Bill ....

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TimB
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 31 Southwest PA
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2002-06-05          39336


Know what you mean on the "sound". The slow cadence of the 4-cyl oldtimers (and ever slower 2-cyl JD's!) just has a whole different effect. Not a big fan of diesel fumes either - hopefully they're not too obvious.

What's your opinion of the rear mower deck vs. a belly mower? I kind of like the on/off ease of the 3ph but not so sure I'm excited about the difference in manuvering (especially if the better half is doing the mowing). It would also seem to deflate if not eliminate some of the advantages of the supersteer option (at least in mowing roles).

....

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BillMullens
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 649 Central West Virginia
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2002-06-05          39339


I understand that the MMM are great, just not an option for me. They were 2X the cost of a 3ph mower, and I would have to add a mid-pto (standard on the "D" model). Much of my work is done in the woods, ground clearance is a must, too much trouble to remove the mower each time. I believe that the NH setup is notorious for being hard to remove and install - somebody correct me if I'm wrong. Anyway, I'm pleased with the King Kutter mower that I have; it doesn't leave a finish quite as good as the 46" lawn mower I had been using, but it is close; and the maneuverability is better than I thought it would be. It just requires a different technique.
Bill ....

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MR ETHICS
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2002-06-05          39342


good question on the MMM's

yes, they are a little better in handleing. But mounting and dismounting is a disadvantage. The MMM's are a little higher priced also.

My expeirience has taught me a few thimgs on the subject.

here is what Ive learned:

No 1 Thr rear mower will mow under low trees much like a front mower, say a Grasshopper, but you have to back up to do this

No 2 In my area, most women have some problems getting used to looking back at the rear while mowing with a 3pt mower. At least this is the feedback I get.Easy ladies!!!!!! This is the comments I here when following up on sales I have made.

No 3. If you change jobs from loader to mower very often, the belly mower can be a little bit of a pain to mount and dismount.

No 4. with a 3pt mower you can get a mode that is rear discharge. I like this option, it is narrower ( no side chute) and they seem to spread the cut grass more evenly. They do cost a little more than side a side discharge, but I feel it's worth it.

No 5. The belly mower will probably be the one your better half wants to run, and it will be a heck of a good mower, but you'll get tired of taking it on and off.

SSSSooo. I guess the real question is who will win?? ....

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TC29 in Wa.
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2002-06-06          39375


I to have a new TC29 with a gear tranny, and live PTO. And its gets used heavily 37 hours in its first 24 days. Thats probably 65% earthmoving, landscaping,etc, and 35% finish mowing with a new 6' First Choice Rear discharge finish mower. (excellant mower by the way) For the landscaping, earthmoving duties, I had it equipped with a Woods 1012 FEL (I went with the Woods loader as it specs out better than the New Holland 7308. bigger lift capacity,higher lift,better breakout power.), and a Woods 7500 backhoe. Also I would recomend using loaded R4 industrial tires, For FEL work or lanscaping in general the extra traction comes in handy. Yet with a little care they don't mark up the lawn.

I actually downsized from a Kubota 4150 this time around. the Class II Boomer fits in and around residential work better and is in more demand. With 3 gear ranges I have as much power as my traction will allow me to handle.

Bottom line my out the door Price was $20,475. I may be wrong, but I don't know if you could come close to that with the TC40 and FEL.

Good luck on your future purchase. ....

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TimB
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 31 Southwest PA
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2002-06-07          39387


I think that one of the advantages of the bigger Boomers or large-frame JDs is that I should be able to mount and run most of the implements that are 'around the farm' now and used with the old Ford. OTOH some of them might be a bit much for a mid-sized unit. Fairly "large" Brush-hog, rear Woods finish mower, 2-bottom plow, disk, rear blade, rear scoop.

(Least that's my story for the better half and I'm sticking to it.)

I want to get my own attachments - at least for the one's I'll use a lot - but it would be nice to make use of these along the way. ....

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cutter
Join Date: Feb 2000
Posts: 1303 The South Shore of Lake Ontario, New York
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2002-06-07          39395


The MMM on my tc29d was difficult to remove and install if it was on a rough surface. If you have a smooth blacktop driveway or cement floor, It slides nicely in and out. I used my loader quite a bit for small jobs with the mower on and never had a problem. I would not trade it for a 3pt unless all my trees were gone. I tried a Woods 3pt rear discharge on the tc while the faulty gear box on my deck was being repaired by the dealer and could see you would need an open lot to use it regularly unless you wanted to spend most of your time backing up. ....

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Jim on Timberridge
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Posts: 172 La Crosse WI
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2002-06-07          39396


What am i missing? Why would you take the MMM off the tractor? I thought one of the advantages of the MMM was that you had the freedom to use implements on the 3pt w/o having to remove a mower. for example if i wanted to spread fertilizer, or make passes with an aerator, i wouldn't have to switch 3ph attachments -- rather just add the needed tool onto the 3ph. maybe i could even do 2 things simultaneously -- mow and aerate.
The MMM also provides weight for low center of gravity, which is handy.
so why take off the MMM?
jim ....

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Compact 101 How big is too big

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BillMullens
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 649 Central West Virginia
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2002-06-07          39397


Jim, I was under the impression that a MMM compromises ground clearance substantially. Most of my landscaping work - if you'd call it that - is in a patch of very rocky woods. It is sometimes tough going without any implements on the tractor. I could be wrong, I've never had a MMM mounted on it, but I think it would be in the way sometimes. My other two reasons for choosing a 3ph mower are: My tractor wouldn't go on my trailer on level ground with a mowing deck on, and, of course, price.
I'm getting good at mowing backwards. Quite handy, in fact.
Bill
....

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TomG
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 5406 Upper Ottawa Valley
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2002-06-08          39406


Jim: I was thinking more of the relation between a MMM and loader. There are quite a few comments from people who take off their loaders when using a MMM. Some comments seem to indicate that's it's more than just dropping the bucket. I'm not certain if it's done simply because it just works better. Having both a MMM and loader mounted would put a lot of weight on the front axles for mowing, or whether some particular MMM's and loaders can't be on at the same time.

I don't know, but I think there's a good chance that my particular loader frame would conflict with a MMM, but then the loader and tractor are from different manufacturers. I wouldn't think of them as being parts of an integrated system. However, even tractors and implements from the same company may not be completely integrated. Maybe backhoe sub-frames that require removal of the 3ph arms is an example. I guess there are design limits to systems.
....

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cutter
Join Date: Feb 2000
Posts: 1303 The South Shore of Lake Ontario, New York
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2002-06-08          39410


On all three compacts that I have owned, the mower frame was different if you bought a loader at the same time. I would assume that a change-out would be required if either were purchased at a later date as an afterthought. I am not sure how the aftermarket units attach. As far as clearance goes, running over logs and in deep mud would prompt me to remove the mower no matter how much clearance the deck had when locked in the up position. The hardest part of installing and removing the N/H and Kubota deck is sliding it into position, but on a smooth floor and with a little practice, it is not a big deal. I takes me perhaps ten minutes to install mine once the tractor is lifted, which you can do with the loader. If you have SS on the N/H, the tractor has to be almost at its loader's lifting limit to clear the housing on the tractor, and then the deck installation is not a problem. I can say that if I needed to remove the deck frequently, I would have either an old tractor for just loader work or an old mower for just lawn work. ....

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cutter
Join Date: Feb 2000
Posts: 1303 The South Shore of Lake Ontario, New York
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2002-06-08          39413


One other comment about the MMM deck. In my experience it does lend stability to the tractor when using the loader. 500# mounted low under the middle of the machine enables me to do light loader work without adding ballast to the rear. I don't however, lift high and heavy loads without the rear weight in place. ....

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DavidJ
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 62 Alabama
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2002-06-08          39415


I think it's the attitude/reputation of the manufacturer of the attachments. For instance I have been looking for a new tractor and have been told by three different dealers that if I get a Bush Hog brand loader I can't have a MMM because of the loader frame. Bush Hog has better specs and expects their equipment to be heavily used therefore has beefed up the mounting thus preventing the installation of the MMM. Im sure that other manufacturers have the same limitations. ....

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jeff r
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 428 burton. michigan
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2002-08-17          41323


ALL very good posts. I have owned a 8n, a jubilee, a jd2010 and now a diesel kubota 2150 hst 4wd with a Woods FEL. I would never load the tires the tires with Calcium Chloride since it is only a matter of time till it leaks and eats your rims up, Organic beat juice is a better option. I have turf tires and AG tires for my kubota plus a woods 3 point blade and this tractor covers ALL the bases better than the previous makes and models I've owned. THe jd2010 did have the hp for my 72inch bushhog though. A tractor without power steering simply sucks. 2WD dont get it either. ....

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HOEMAN00
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 11 FREDERICKTOWN, OHIO
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2002-09-30          43109


I have a 35D w/ 84" MMM and when locked up u have about
8" of clearance under mower.
Taking mower off is couple minute job after I did a few times and
cut a 10" long RR tie to put under each wheel.
Unhook front pins, pull up on blocks, unhook rear pins and PTO.,
slide out.
Goes on in reverse order and hook PTO up last(slide on a creeper from behind
is the easiest).
I take mower off about once a week.
I left 43" circle of uncut grass whenSS turned full lock w/o brakes.
That is turning pretty sharp.
It does a superior job to my 72" woods RFM. ....

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bosco2
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 16
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2020-08-07          199567


Quote:
Originally Posted by HOEMAN00 | view 43109
I have a 35D w/ 84" MMM and when locked up u have about8" of clearance under mower.Taking mower off is couple minute job after I did a few times andcut a 10" long RR tie to put under each wheel.Unhook front pins, pull up on blocks, unhook rear pins and PTO.,slide out.Goes on in reverse order and hook PTO up last(slide on a creeper from behindis the easiest).I take mower off about once a week.I left 43" circle of uncut grass whenSSturned full lock w/o brakes.That is turning pretty sharp.It does a superior job to my 72" woods RFM.


This is from many years ago but has me scratching my head on the technique as it is hassle the way I am doing it.

Wondering if the poster meant that he made 4 railroad tie ramps for all for wheels to get it up on blocks. Hmm wish he had posted a pix. ....

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