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Telescoping draft links

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dwilson
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 22 Galesburg, IL & Ferryville, WI
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2001-07-12          30020


Since I got the word about the availability of telescoping draft links for the JD 4000 series tractors from this board, I thought I would report the result. My dealer could not find a listing in his regular parts computer, but it turned up in the JD computer. They cost $208 plus shipping. Easy to install and they work like a dream. It's much simpler to line up the left-hand (stationary) side and, with the combination of the adjustable lift and the telescoping link, the right side is unbelievably easy to line up and attach. No more armwrestling with the 3-point hitch to hook up the implements up to my JD 4400. Thanks for the tip.

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Telescoping draft links

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dsg
Join Date: Jun 1999
Posts: 528 Franklin, Maine
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2001-07-12          30021


Doug, I love the tele. links, greatest thing since sliced bread. This is not a slam at you about price, but I would like others to know, I got the Links for $195. plus my state tax. You should NOT have to pay shipping. The dealer can get this item as a stock item and would not have to pay shipping unless it was needed sooner than the regular stock shipments. Please do not be fooled by this Shipping charge. Only items that need to be shipped (overnight, or within a few days has a charge). David ....

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Telescoping draft links

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John Miller, III
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2001-07-12          30022


I agree with the ease of use of any telescoping draft links. I have both telescoping on a couple tractors and a quick hitch on one tractor. I'd highly recommend buying the telescopic arms if they are available for your tractor versus any quick hitch assembly... and if they aren't available...well that's why God let someone invent the 6' pry bar and sledge hammer for all the others... ....

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Telescoping draft links

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john hunter
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2001-07-12          30033


Please explain to me what the telescoping draft link does. Does it require hydraulic? ....

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Telescoping draft links

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TomG
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 5406 Upper Ottawa Valley
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2001-07-13          30036


As far as I know, telescoping lower links release so the link can be extended so it's easier to match up the pins. The tractor can then be backed up to lock the links in place for operation. Maybe there's potential for some fun in the various responses. I'd say that God allowed somebody to invent the pry-bar and sledge in order to get the pyramids built. Seems like I haven't learned anything since then ‘cause those are what I use. I'd turn the thing around and say that God allowed somebody to invent telescoping links for people who don't put their implements on blocks and can't back up square to an implement. Return shots expected. Actually, I would have found the telescoping links handy last summer when I had to keep the tractor and implements clustered in a small bush clearing. I couldn't back up square due to the close quarters and did spend quite a bit of time levering things around. They also should be great for people who change implements very frequently or who have small equipment sheds. ....

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Telescoping draft links

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dwilson
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 22 Galesburg, IL & Ferryville, WI
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2001-07-13          30041


John, the telescoping link is purely mechanical and requires no hydraulic hookup. The two arms that extend out from your 3-point hitch to hook onto your implement are called draft links. The telescoping version makes it possible to extend the end of the link so that you can attach the hitch to your implement without being precisely lined up, which is sometimes virtually impossible to do. Without some way of bringing an unlined-up link to the implement, the alternative (known as the hard way) is to force the hitch and implement into alignment by fair means or foul. As my old boss used to say, it is a good way to lose your religion. ....

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Telescoping draft links

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Murf
Join Date: Dec 1999
Posts: 7140 Toronto Area, Ontario, Canada
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2001-07-13          30042


OK, now for my two cents worth (3.1 US cents, LOL) on this subject. Tom's comments about leaving implements in less than ideal spots for attaching or removing. We are constantly faced with this challenge since almost everyone of our implement changes are on-site. Wherever possible we park implements under big trees, this way you only have to back up close to an implement, and alignment does not matter either, provided you have a stout piece of strap and a set of block and tackle. Place a strap (or such) over a big branch directly over the implement, lift the implement by the upper link pin, it will now swing easily into position. Removal is similar, set the implement down, unhook top link and lift a litttle, remove lower pins and set the piece down after moving away. Now, as 'Norm' would say "But first a few words about shop safety...". First, be sure all hoisting equipment is up to the task. Next, NEVER put anything (like any part of you) under the implement which you would not want it to drop on (then it can't). Lastly, DO NOT EVER leave things hanging in the air unattended. Best of luck. ....

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Telescoping draft links

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Russ DenBleyker
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Posts: 1
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2001-07-13          30043


A return shot for Tom: Go out and purchase a used 500 pound implement that someone has used very roughly with a big tractor and bent the 3 point frame so that the left and right pins are no longer in line with each other. Back up square to it and try to attach it without telescoping links. You will soon develop a greater appreciation for telescoping links! ....

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Telescoping draft links

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TomG
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 5406 Upper Ottawa Valley
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2001-07-14          30063


I've got to move tractor back to a small bush clearing in a week or so. I could very well wish for telescoping links, especially since there are no big trees handy to try Murf's idea. My wife would get cranky if I cut the smaller trees to make the clearing larger, so guess I'll just have to lever things around. I actually think the links are probably pretty good gadgets for people who change implements frequently. The point I want to make is that there is a learning curve in swapping implements. It starts out being a pain, and then it gets pretty easy. It's probably a good idea for new owners to develop the knack of swapping implements, see how often swapping is needed after 'first projects' are done, and then decide if it's a problem or not. I probably would have been very interested in telescoping links when I first got the tractor, but perhaps not now. My 650# forklift is the only implement I ever use a hammer (3#) to release or seat the pins. The problem with the forklift is that the draft link mounts are so wide that the arms barely spread wide enough to mount it. However, I've easily changed it's alignment to the tractor well over 1' and maybe 6" to the side with a pry-bar. It's more work carrying the bar to the tractor. For developing swapping knacks: It's very good to see what happens when the draft arms can be lifted by hand, and what happens when the side-leveler is changed. Whether lateral float is on of off makes a difference. My 1710 has a crank side-leveler adjustment that is handy for making fine up and down alignment adjustments. ....

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TomG
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 5406 Upper Ottawa Valley
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2001-07-14          30066


Russ: I must be living right. I figure that I sort of deserved something to make me go 'ouch'. Yes, you're right, learning to back up square is one thing, but learning to back up just the right 'not square' for one particular implement is another thing. If I had to do it very often, I'd probably want to give up my blocks and pry-bar. ....

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Telescoping draft links

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lsheaffer
Join Date: Jun 1999
Posts: 1048 Northern Illinois
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2001-07-14          30087


I find this discussion interesting. I haven't had telescoping links in my 40 years of working on a farm & one doesn't push around 8 row cultivators to hook them up. The secret is to line up the lower arm first. The other arm can then be lifted & tractor moved back or forward to hook up the other side. If the top link is too short, pull tractor a head with 3 point down. If too long lift 3 point. I haven't figured out for sure if this discussion is about hydraulic or mechanical links. $200 seems high for mechanical ones. I have hydraulic top & side links for under $200 at sheaftractor@coiinc.com ....

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Telescoping draft links

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TomG
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 5406 Upper Ottawa Valley
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2001-07-15          30090


I think the discussion is about mechanical links. I believe they're replacements for the draft arms. They release and can be pulled out, and then they lock when the tractor is backed up. I've always imagined that the links on large farm tractors are hydraulic. Seems like almost every motion on some farm tractors can be hydraulic--the cigarette lighter maybe. Guess there's only so much that can be done with an 8gpm compact pump. The trick of using the 3ph to get the right distance for making the top-link pin was one of my later 3ph discoveries. I used to lever things up and block them (takes awhile to learn to use the tractor instead of muscle I guess). Reading this board sure does speed up the learning curve. To shorten up the top-link distance, I sometimes lift the 3ph to take the weight off the blocks at the front on an implement, kick out the blocks and then lower it. I have to do this to raise the carriage of my forklift to vertical so the top-link pin can be made. I can't lift the carriage myself and raise it with a come-along and clevis pins in the top-link mounds. Also use a safety chain around the carriage and ROPS. I have to drop the front of the carriage to get an angle, or the come-along won't lift it either. People with post-hole augers have similar problems. ....

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mike dewald
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2001-07-15          30107


Helpful hint when hooking up 3 pt equipment. If you have a loader on the tractor use it to help with hook up. Back up to the implement with lift arms near the pins of implement. Rotate the bucket edge nearly all the way down. Next lower the loader to place much of the weight of the front end on the bucket. Then tip the bucket one way or the other to move tractor slightly. Attach the draft arm with is now aligned properly. Next tip the bucket again to move the tractor and align the other draft arm and attach it. Use the loader to move the tractor/implement to align it and not your back or muscles. This method will also hold the tractor in place if on a slight incline. As L. Sheaffer said, a pry bar is not needed. Also like he said, align the lower draft arm first if the arms aren't the same height. Once the lower arm is attached, use the tractor lift to raise the other side to the proper height. ....

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TomG
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 5406 Upper Ottawa Valley
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2001-07-16          30116


Real good idea Mike! I might even learn enough tricks to give up my pry-bar. I have used your basic idea for making larger alignments, but I did them with the clutch. I stopped because it didn't work very well and may not be very safe. Moving the tractor with the loader seems like a much better idea. I'll try it, but I'm guessing that the fine adjustments I use to make the 3ph pins by hand will still be easier for me with a pry-bar rather than climbing on and off the tractor to adjust the loader. Don't know; I’ll wait and see which works best, but it's good to have an alternative. Of course, with very heavy farm tractor implements, it's not so much a question of not needing a pry-bar, as much as it is how well one would work unless it's about 15' long. On the other hand, I have seen two people, each with a special pry-bar, move boxcars. ....

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kay
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2001-07-16          30123


TomG The point, I think, Steve is making is that you do not have to climb on and off the tractor to make the fine adjustments with the loader trick. Just reach for the joy stick and tweek it as you need to make the corrections. You do have to climb on and off to work the clutch to move the tractor. I've long thought that a rear hand remote control of the forward/reverse movement of the tractor when hooking up 3pt implements (and wagons) would be a handy invention. Some would say it is not safe, but if the tractor only moved in increments of a 1/2 inch or so, it couldn't be very unsafe. Push the button three times and it moves 1 1/2 inches, or whatever. Thanks for the loader tip. I will use it for sure. ....

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TomG
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 5406 Upper Ottawa Valley
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2001-07-16          30126


Yes, it is true that I had the standard safety procedures in mind (don't do anything with the tractor unless sitting in the seat) when I said 'climb on and off'. It also is true that many people, including myself, regularly violate the procedure--especially when swapping implements and greasing loaders. Even when the violation is an educated one and the risks are understood, it is still better not to. However, we all develop our own styles, and some stick closer to safety procedures than others. Anyway, this is a thread where everybody made good suggestions. I'm just half-heartedly sticking to a defense of my pry-bar. After all, I've had it for twenty years longer than the tractor. I suppose I do owe it some loyalty, and it does work well for my purposes. On the other hand, I can make a 'not very likely' case for climbing on to the tractor to make the loader adjustments. Whether I would climb on or not is another question. ....

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sholsclaw
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 2 United States
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2015-04-28          192676


Hey can you tell me how long these draft lengths are for the John deer 4000, I have a fx 32 yanmar and i'm wondering if the John deer will fit. I didn't know how hard these telescoping draft lengths were so hard to find. All the parts people I've talked to don't seem to know the length. That's all I need to know is the length shortened up on center. Thanks for your help ....

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