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Kubota B2100 Power Steering Unit Seal or no Seal

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slevenjr
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 1 Wesson, MS
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster

2007-08-06          144389


Our B2100 developed a hydraulic leak due to a loose connection of the forward metal line at the hydraulic unit. When I got the cowling removed, I noticed that the bolts holding the actual unit down had loosened and the ENTIRE column was quiet loose. This is my question. Where the unit bolts to the top of the frame, does it require a seal, or is the unit self-contained? Any help greatly appreciated.

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____________________________________________________________________________________
Kubota B2100 Power Steering Unit Seal or no Seal

View my Photos
candoarms
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1932 North Dakota
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster  View my Photos  Pics

2007-08-06          144396


Slevinjr,

I had the same problem with my B2100. The hydraulic line worked loose and eventually cracked. When I replaced the line, I discovered the reason for it breaking.

The hydraulic unit (power steering valve) had worked its way loose from the frame. The play in the steering valve caused the line to crack.

The unit is self-contained. It bolts directly to the frame. If I'm not mistaken, you'll need a 21mm wrench to tighten the bolts.

Open the engine hood.

Remove both side covers.

Remove the pin holding the throttle lever in place.

Slide the throttle lever off of its shaft.

Remove the single screw in the top of the instrument panel.

Carefully Lift the instrument panel off JUST AN INCH OR THREE.

Remove the tachometer cable from the rear of the instrument panel.

Carefully set the instrument panel aside, with all wiring still attached.

Slide the Steering column cover up, and then outward toward the seat. It's held on with four plastic hooks.

You can now get to the bolts that hold the steering valve to the frame.

If you can, install some lock-Tite or other thread locker onto the bolt threads. The bolts go directly into the frame through ears on the valve. Be careful not to tighten the bolts so tight that you crack or break the ears. I do not have any torque specs to go by.

Need any further help? Just ask. I'll be more than happy to help.

Joel ....

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____________________________________________________________________________________
Kubota B2100 Power Steering Unit Seal or no Seal

View my Photos
candoarms
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1932 North Dakota
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster  View my Photos  Pics

2007-08-16          144724


Slevenjr,

I forgot to mention that there are four bolts involved with this.

Two bolts run vertically, through the top of the lower ears on the steering valve. There is one on the left, and another on the right side of the valve.

The other two bolts are located on the right side of the tractor and run horizontally through a metal plate, which is welded to the tractor's frame, and then into two tapped holes in the right side of the steering valve. These holes are located a bit higher on the valve, and to the rear.

All four bolts are 17mm. You may have to turn the wheel just a bit in order to reach the bolts, as the steering arm runs directly in front of one of these bolts.

My son helped me tighten these bolts again yesterday. The entire job, from start to finish, took less than 20 minutes.

The most difficult part of this job is getting the roll pin out and back into the throttle lever.

I'm going to make a special "C" clamp for this job, by drilling a hole in one end, and welding a pin punch to the screw. This tool will make this job very easy to perform in the future, as it will eliminate the use of a hammer, punch, and a second person to support the throttle lever.

I'll place the open hole over one end of the pin, and then place the pin punch into the pin on the other side. When I turn the screw on the special "C" clamp, it will push the roll pin out of the throttle shaft, and straight through the hole in the other side of the clamp. This tool should cut the repair time by about half.

Joel ....

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