Nortrac Hydraulic Reservoir Repair: NorTrac Tractors  -- Chinese Tractors Discussion Forum and Review Nortrac Hydraulic Reservoir Repair: NorTrac Tractors -- Chinese Tractors Discussion Forum

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 11-21-2014, 08:12 Post: 191477
Huddleston



Join Date: Oct 2013
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 Nortrac Hydraulic Reservoir Repair

It is best to look over the unit to see what all has to be removed to get to problem.You will notice all of the oil lines and mechanical connections.

To start you will have to remove the seat and top cover of the reservoir.I'm not an engineer, however I have noticed some things that I would have done differently.

First, I would have added a drain plug for the oil removal, you will have to suck it out. This is old technology and if your mechanically incline it's not hard to figure out. I never worked on this type of machinery, however it has advantages as well disadvantages.

I wanted to make sure that all the components went back in as they came out so I took pictures. The only part that needed to be well inspected is the directional valve block. Making sure the spring and valve stem was installed correctly.

There are so many things that can go wrong with this type of machinery that you will need to have a manual in which points out how to correct problems, as of yet they don't make one.

They have two different manuals about parts and maintenance. However they are lacking in telling you the needed information about why problems exist and what you need to look for them as what to expect in fixing them.

Especially, concerning the two stage clutch. That is a time consuming job in which two people are needed to adjusting it to a working order.






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 11-21-2014, 09:14 Post: 191478
Huddleston



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 Nortrac Hydraulic Reservoir Repair

I just noticed the three bolts holding down the reservoir on the front.





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 11-21-2014, 09:14 Post: 191479
Huddleston



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 Nortrac Hydraulic Reservoir Repair

I reckon that all the bolts that hold the plate on also bolts down the resevoir housing





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 11-21-2014, 09:15 Post: 191480
Huddleston



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 Nortrac Hydraulic Reservoir Repair

It seems that for me to get into this spring housing, I will have to take off the reservoir housing.





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 11-21-2014, 09:16 Post: 191481
Huddleston



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 Nortrac Hydraulic Reservoir Repair

Before tearing the resevoir off is there away to make sure that the seal is blown.





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 01-02-2015, 12:39 Post: 191755
yocsr1



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 Nortrac Hydraulic Reservoir Repair

You don't have to take the resevoir off to rebuild. I rebuilt my foton which looks similar to yours. Once you take the top block off use air pressure in the fluid hole to bring the piston out. Everything comes out without removing the whole resevoir. It is a tight fit but will come out.






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 01-03-2015, 03:43 Post: 191758
Huddleston



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 Nortrac Hydraulic Reservoir Repair

Hey guys


I appreciate any feed back. I do make mistakes. I like to point out that I stream-line my work, which makes it easier for me to do the next time I need to do work on it.

You would have noticed that I had I already pointed out that procedure which you have suggested.

If you look under my name "HUDDLESTON", which is located on the page. Just take your cursor and place it there and click on it you will see a list of all my messages and pictures concerning the repair of the hydraulic lift.

When oil enters into a cylinder the pressure is place equally throughout the cylinder. The pressure will move the piston either in or out. When the pressure builds up to the point where it will not lift or lower the implement you will hear a noise. It will be a high pitch noise where the relief valve has open. This is a safety valve where the pressure has exceeded its potential limit where it could cause damage to the components of the system including the hydraulic hoses.

The engine speed works in correlation to the operation of the pump and the implement that is moving. The flow control valve operates the speed of movement of the implement and so does the engine speed. The faster the engine speed the faster the pump will run. Some system have a few more components in it which you need to know, if you want to know how it works

Concerning the hydraulic lift operation, which moves the piston back and forth, we have found overtime that the rubber seal and scraper combined with the rust buildup will cause some wear on the cylinder. To get it back into working operation you will need either a larger rubber seal or you will need to use a brake hone to remove any scratches or grooves from the cylinder.

If you have worked on many cars it's the same as the inside of a brake cylinder which had water buildup over the years. You will find that water within the system will cause the metal to rust, this rust will build up over time. The piston will cause excessive wear which needs to be honed or replaced.

Rust seems to collect in places where there is less oil flow or behind the rubber seals located on the pistons. This rust will lodge itself at the bottom of the rubber seal, which will move back and forth inside the bottom of the cylinder, it will continue to collect enough rust until there is enough buildup to start cutting into the metal. Usually this will happen because people don't take the time to do preventive maintenance. Oil needs to be change as well as filters. Usually a pump will fail first, however is some circumstances it will be a cylinder.

This excessive wear, will cause scratches and grooves, which will only be found in the cylinder wall where the rubber and scraper touches the bottom of the metal cylinder. If you check my messages and pictures, it will describe how the water gets into the system.

The only reason for removing the reservoir block was to repair any damage to the lift cylinder itself. You would need to remove the reservoir block from the tractor. The cylinder is bolted to the bottom of the reservoir block by bolts that come up from underneath and screw into the cylinder.

If the piston seal is compromised it will leak. A bad cylinder will not allow the piston seal to work correctly. Your cylinder may need to be machined to remove any damages.

If you have the correct oil pressure and it still will not lift, you may also have a component issues, such as a relief valve may be stuck open. If your not sure you will need to find someone who knows how to check or work on hydraulic systems. There are some components which need to be tested to see if the system is working correctly. Working with a hydraulic system can be very dangerous. You will need to purchase a "fluke" hydraulic oil pressure gauge in which to check to see if it meets the specs.

If your not sure about what your doing I can assure you that there is nothing more dangerous than a cavitating hydraulic oil pump or a weak hydraulic line. A cavitating hydraulic oil pump can explode like a grenade. A weak hydraulic hose can fail and high pressure oil can slice through flesh like a knife or worst pierce your body cavity. You will need to make sure you have enough oil in the system, the pump can't run without oil, it will pit the plates and cause excessive heat buildup which may damage the pump. Clean oil, plus a full tank of oil is mandatory, it will extend the life of the pump and the systems components.

Oh yes, someone sent me an email concerning a cylinder on a front loader. This cylinder works in the same compacity, however I need to point out that the outside elements may affect its operation overtime. When the piston pushes the rod out of the cylinder it is affected by the water, dirt and anything that might strike the clean slick shaft that fits inside of the cylinder.

Inside of the cylinder is a scraper seal that does its best to keep out the elements. Yet, overtime you will see that the cap end of the cylinder will start leaking oil. Before you remove the cylinder, which you may believe that it needs a new seal.

If the cylinder is working in the manner which it does its job. I would recommend that that you take the end cap off. You may have to buy a good spanner wrench. Mine cost over $100 dollars at Grainger supply.

You will notice that there are holes on the face of the cap of the cylinder and there are holes on the outside circumference of the cap. After removing the cap you'll need to buy a good silicone sealer and fill up the cavity at the end of cap and the seal will usually fix a leak.

Make sure that you fill the cavity behind the scraper seal. When tightening this cap down you will probably have some of the silicone come out of the cap threads and this is okay. Read the tube to see how long it takes to set up and double the time since it is inside of the cylinder. I have yet had a cylinder leak after doing this.

Another email:

Concerning about welding a hydraulic cylinder. When cylinders get old, paint falls off and you will have rust buildup at the weld seam. Overtime these seams may compromise and start leaking oil and may even split.
I'm always informing people that these are expensive parts and a little sandpaper and paint will help keep these in working order.

These aren't large splits, maybe less than 3 inches however when oil is pressurized it will spray quite a bit of oil.

It's always best XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX take your time.

One end is the cap and the other is the pin connection. You will notice the two hydraulic lines that connect to it. One hose is attached at each end. Usually at the pinned end is where the cylinder will bottom out, this is where the seals are located at the end of the shaft at the bottom of the cylinder.

When oil is delivered at the pinned in it will push the shaft out to the cap end.

When oil is delivered the the cap end it will push the seal to the pinned end.

The point I want to make is that you need to know where the seal is located inside the cylinder before you weld. Move the seal to the end furthest away from the split. Grind down the outside of the cylinder.

I want to point out that I usually do this out in field.

To tear down a piece of equipment that needs to be working is costing time and money. If I can do this without any consequences (damaging any more equipment) or violating my safety I will try it.

Everything is relative to what you believe that you can accomplish. If you have second thought this isn't for you.

This can be dangerous.

I highly recommend if you do it, you will do it in a controlled situation first. I learned this while I was in the US Navy, only by someone that knew what they were doing.

I don't take anything for granted when dealing with electricity, pressurized oil or mechanical machinery.

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

If the cylinder is small in length you may want to wrap water soak rags around the cylinder to protect the seals. However you are working with high voltage electricity and it doesn't mix with water.

BACK TO THE TRACTORS HYDRAULIC LIFT.

That is why I suggested to anyone who owns a Nortrac tractor. To remove the oil from the reservoir a person needs to drill a hole in the base of the reservoir even with the bottom in which to remove water buildup. You could drill and tap a 1/4 hole and place a 4 inch pipe with a cock valve on it.

It would have been nice if the manufacturer did it.

I was asked by someone where I learned my knowledge and experience. When I graduated from high school I went to a Diesel School in Louisville, Kentucky. I got drafted in 1970 and the next day I joined the US NAVY. I went to their diesel schools to work on the big boys ( Fairbanks and Morse ), these engines were over twenty feet long and twelve feet tall. I was station on the USS Independence CVA 62.

With these big engines we hardly ever change the oil we always replenished it. The oil was always tested to see how much acidity buildup acquired over each month. Then we removed or added oil / additives to specifications that required proper operation of equipment.

Today, I still do this with most of my mechanical equipment.

I have never had a automatic transmission go bad. I always removed what was in the sump and replaced it every-time, whenever I did an oil change.

Engine oil is cheap, however it is best to change it instead of adding additives. You will notice the car manufactures keep pushing back their oil changes. The last one I notice was 6000 miles. I can only say that they want you to keep buying their cars instead of repairing them.

I change my cars engine oil and filters every 3000 miles, all the other fluids I change every 3 years. I replace all belts and hoses every 6 years. I grease all joints once a year.

My tractor I change the oil and filters once a year.
I grease every fitting every time I use it, especially the back hole and front loader. These pins need to be greased each time that you use it, they wear out quickly
in they are not greased.


Anyone can do this work, however you need to learn not only the basic mechanical knowledge, you need to learn safety protocol in dealing with these types of problems.

You always hear that when someone dies from an accident more than likely it was someones hobby. Lot of times people take things for granted if they see someone else doing it. They thought they could do this type of work too. Please take the time to learn about anything that is dangerous before you work on it.

I also went to plumbing, electrical and HVAC schools, I needed to learn this while working for General Electric Company

There are so many videos on you tube that may help. Just type google and it will take you to sites in which you may find books or DVDs to help you.

I hope this clears up any issues.

Again thanks for the reply.

Huddleston






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 01-03-2015, 03:43 Post: 191759
Huddleston



Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: United States
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 47

7
Filter by User
 Nortrac Hydraulic Reservoir Repair

Hey guys


I appreciate any feed back. I do make mistakes. I like to point out that I stream-line my work, which makes it easier for me to do the next time I need to do work on it.

You would have noticed that I had I already pointed out that procedure which you have suggested.

If you look under my name "HUDDLESTON", which is located on the page. Just take your cursor and place it there and click on it you will see a list of all my messages and pictures concerning the repair of the hydraulic lift.

When oil enters into a cylinder the pressure is place equally throughout the cylinder. The pressure will move the piston either in or out. When the pressure builds up to the point where it will not lift or lower the implement you will hear a noise. It will be a high pitch noise where the relief valve has open. This is a safety valve where the pressure has exceeded its potential limit where it could cause damage to the components of the system including the hydraulic hoses.

The engine speed works in correlation to the operation of the pump and the implement that is moving. The flow control valve operates the speed of movement of the implement and so does the engine speed. The faster the engine speed the faster the pump will run. Some system have a few more components in it which you need to know, if you want to know how it works

Concerning the hydraulic lift operation, which moves the piston back and forth, we have found overtime that the rubber seal and scraper combined with the rust buildup will cause some wear on the cylinder. To get it back into working operation you will need either a larger rubber seal or you will need to use a brake hone to remove any scratches or grooves from the cylinder.

If you have worked on many cars it's the same as the inside of a brake cylinder which had water buildup over the years. You will find that water within the system will cause the metal to rust, this rust will build up over time. The piston will cause excessive wear which needs to be honed or replaced.

Rust seems to collect in places where there is less oil flow or behind the rubber seals located on the pistons. This rust will lodge itself at the bottom of the rubber seal, which will move back and forth inside the bottom of the cylinder, it will continue to collect enough rust until there is enough buildup to start cutting into the metal. Usually this will happen because people don't take the time to do preventive maintenance. Oil needs to be change as well as filters. Usually a pump will fail first, however is some circumstances it will be a cylinder.

This excessive wear, will cause scratches and grooves, which will only be found in the cylinder wall where the rubber and scraper touches the bottom of the metal cylinder. If you check my messages and pictures, it will describe how the water gets into the system.

The only reason for removing the reservoir block was to repair any damage to the lift cylinder itself. You would need to remove the reservoir block from the tractor. The cylinder is bolted to the bottom of the reservoir block by bolts that come up from underneath and screw into the cylinder.

If the piston seal is compromised it will leak. A bad cylinder will not allow the piston seal to work correctly. Your cylinder may need to be machined to remove any damages.

If you have the correct oil pressure and it still will not lift, you may also have a component issues, such as a relief valve may be stuck open. If your not sure you will need to find someone who knows how to check or work on hydraulic systems. There are some components which need to be tested to see if the system is working correctly. Working with a hydraulic system can be very dangerous. You will need to purchase a "fluke" hydraulic oil pressure gauge in which to check to see if it meets the specs.

If your not sure about what your doing I can assure you that there is nothing more dangerous than a cavitating hydraulic oil pump or a weak hydraulic line. A cavitating hydraulic oil pump can explode like a grenade. A weak hydraulic hose can fail and high pressure oil can slice through flesh like a knife or worst pierce your body cavity. You will need to make sure you have enough oil in the system, the pump can't run without oil, it will pit the plates and cause excessive heat buildup which may damage the pump. Clean oil, plus a full tank of oil is mandatory, it will extend the life of the pump and the systems components.

Oh yes, someone sent me an email concerning a cylinder on a front loader. This cylinder works in the same compacity, however I need to point out that the outside elements may affect its operation overtime. When the piston pushes the rod out of the cylinder it is affected by the water, dirt and anything that might strike the clean slick shaft that fits inside of the cylinder.

Inside of the cylinder is a scraper seal that does its best to keep out the elements. Yet, overtime you will see that the cap end of the cylinder will start leaking oil. Before you remove the cylinder, which you may believe that it needs a new seal.

If the cylinder is working in the manner which it does its job. I would recommend that that you take the end cap off. You may have to buy a good spanner wrench. Mine cost over $100 dollars at Grainger supply.

You will notice that there are holes on the face of the cap of the cylinder and there are holes on the outside circumference of the cap. After removing the cap you'll need to buy a good silicone sealer and fill up the cavity at the end of cap and the seal will usually fix a leak.

Make sure that you fill the cavity behind the scraper seal. When tightening this cap down you will probably have some of the silicone come out of the cap threads and this is okay. Read the tube to see how long it takes to set up and double the time since it is inside of the cylinder. I have yet had a cylinder leak after doing this.

Another email:

Concerning about welding a hydraulic cylinder. When cylinders get old, paint falls off and you will have rust buildup at the weld seam. Overtime these seams may compromise and start leaking oil and may even split.
I'm always informing people that these are expensive parts and a little sandpaper and paint will help keep these in working order.

These aren't large splits, maybe less than 3 inches however when oil is pressurized it will spray quite a bit of oil.

It's always best XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX take your time.

One end is the cap and the other is the pin connection. You will notice the two hydraulic lines that connect to it. One hose is attached at each end. Usually at the pinned end is where the cylinder will bottom out, this is where the seals are located at the end of the shaft at the bottom of the cylinder.

When oil is delivered at the pinned in it will push the shaft out to the cap end.

When oil is delivered the the cap end it will push the seal to the pinned end.

The point I want to make is that you need to know where the seal is located inside the cylinder before you weld. Move the seal to the end furthest away from the split. Grind down the outside of the cylinder.

I want to point out that I usually do this out in field.

To tear down a piece of equipment that needs to be working is costing time and money. If I can do this without any consequences (damaging any more equipment) or violating my safety I will try it.

Everything is relative to what you believe that you can accomplish. If you have second thought this isn't for you.

This can be dangerous.

I highly recommend if you do it, you will do it in a controlled situation first. I learned this while I was in the US Navy, only by someone that knew what they were doing.

I don't take anything for granted when dealing with electricity, pressurized oil or mechanical machinery.

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

If the cylinder is small in length you may want to wrap water soak rags around the cylinder to protect the seals. However you are working with high voltage electricity and it doesn't mix with water.

BACK TO THE TRACTORS HYDRAULIC LIFT.

That is why I suggested to anyone who owns a Nortrac tractor. To remove the oil from the reservoir a person needs to drill a hole in the base of the reservoir even with the bottom in which to remove water buildup. You could drill and tap a 1/4 hole and place a 4 inch pipe with a cock valve on it.

It would have been nice if the manufacturer did it.

I was asked by someone where I learned my knowledge and experience. When I graduated from high school I went to a Diesel School in Louisville, Kentucky. I got drafted in 1970 and the next day I joined the US NAVY. I went to their diesel schools to work on the big boys ( Fairbanks and Morse ), these engines were over twenty feet long and twelve feet tall. I was station on the USS Independence CVA 62.

With these big engines we hardly ever change the oil we always replenished it. The oil was always tested to see how much acidity buildup acquired over each month. Then we removed or added oil / additives to specifications that required proper operation of equipment.

Today, I still do this with most of my mechanical equipment.

I have never had a automatic transmission go bad. I always removed what was in the sump and replaced it every-time, whenever I did an oil change.

Engine oil is cheap, however it is best to change it instead of adding additives. You will notice the car manufactures keep pushing back their oil changes. The last one I notice was 6000 miles. I can only say that they want you to keep buying their cars instead of repairing them.

I change my cars engine oil and filters every 3000 miles, all the other fluids I change every 3 years. I replace all belts and hoses every 6 years. I grease all joints once a year.

My tractor I change the oil and filters once a year.
I grease every fitting every time I use it, especially the back hole and front loader. These pins need to be greased each time that you use it, they wear out quickly
in they are not greased.


Anyone can do this work, however you need to learn not only the basic mechanical knowledge, you need to learn safety protocol in dealing with these types of problems.

You always hear that when someone dies from an accident more than likely it was someones hobby. Lot of times people take things for granted if they see someone else doing it. They thought they could do this type of work too. Please take the time to learn about anything that is dangerous before you work on it.

I also went to plumbing, electrical and HVAC schools, I needed to learn this while working for General Electric Company

There are so many videos on you tube that may help. Just type google and it will take you to sites in which you may find books or DVDs to help you.

I hope this clears up any issues.

Again thanks for the reply.

Huddleston






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > NorTrac Tractors Forum

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