Tractor for Wildflower Bed: Farming Ranching Agriculture  -- General Tractor Discussion Forum and Review Tractor for Wildflower Bed: Farming Ranching Agriculture -- General Tractor Discussion Forum

  parts   |   manuals   |   discussion   |   photos   |   podcast   |   reviews   |   specs   |   dealers   |   classifieds   |   contact   |   faq   |   myProfile   |   home          Login Now | Sign Up


FAQ:   What is a tractor?

Forum Index

Kubota Tractors
  Kubota News
  Kubota Price
  Kubota Review
John Deere Tractors
  John Deere News
  John Deere Price
  John Deere Review
New Holland Tractors
  New Holland Tractor Price
  New Holland Tractor Revie
Other Tractor Brands
  Articulated Tractors
  Belarus
  Bobcat Tractors
  Case
  Cub Cadet
  Hinomoto
  Kioti Tractor
  Long
  Massey Ferguson
  Mitsubishi
  Other Tractor Brands
  Other Tractor News
  Shibaura
  Yanmar Tractors
Lawn and Garden Tractors
  Craftsman
  Cub Cadet Garden
  John Deere Garden
  Kubota Lawn Garden
  Other Garden Tractors
  Simplicity
  Toro Wheelhorse
  Ventrac Lawn Tractors
Antique Tractors
  Allis Chalmers
  Case David Brown
  Farmall IHC
  Ford
  Ford 9N 2N 8N
  Fordson
  Harry Ferguson
  John Deere Older
  Massey-Harris Ferguson
  Minneapolis Moline
  Oliver Cletrac Cockshutt
  Restoration
  Tractor Pulling
Tractor Attachments Implements 3ph
  Back Hoe
  Field Mowers Brush Cutter
  Grooming Mowers Finish Mo
  Loaders
  Snowblowers / Snow Plows
  Tillers and Ploughs
  Tractor Implements
  Trenchers
  Wood Chippers 3PH
Tractor Maintenance
  Diesel Fuel Lubrication E
  Tractor Engine Repair Reb
  Tractor Tires
Utility ATV
  All Terrain Vehicles
  John Deere Gator
  Mule Utility Vehicles
General Tractor
  Farming Ranching Agricult
  Photo Contest
  Size Tractor Needed
  Tractor Projects
  Tractor Safety
  Welding
Chinese Tractors
  Jinma Farmpro Agracat
  NorTrac Tractors
  Other Chinese Tractors
Cars
  All Brands
  Audi VW
  BMW
  Car Tires and Maintenance
  Chrysler
  Exotic, Sports, Racing
  Ford Cars
  General Motors
  Honda
  Hyundai
  Mercedes
  News
  Nissan
  Subaru
  SUV and Trucks
  Toyota Cars
Trucks Trailers
  Chevy Pickup Trucks
  Dodge Pickup Trucks
  Ford Pickup Trucks
  Toyota Pickup Trucks
  Chevy Pickup Trucks
  Dodge Pickup Trucks
  Ford Pickup Trucks
  Toyota Pickup Trucks
Home Building
  Alternate Electric Energy
  Barns Pole Barns
  Buying Ranch Farm Acreage
  Carpentry
  Contractors
  Electric
  Excavation
  Moldings Finish Trim
  Other Home Building
  Pellet Stoves
  Plumbing
  Wood Stoves
Tools
  Electirc Power Tools
  Gas Power Tools
  Generators
  Shop Tools
  Techniques Howto
Landscape
  Flowers Shrubs Garden
  Golf Course Maintenance
  Irrigation Systems
  Landscape Design
  Landscape Lighting
  Landscape Maintenance
  Lawn, Turf, and Grass
  Vegetable Gardening
Construction
  Caterpillar
  Komatsu
  Wheel Loaders
Current Events Health Happiness
  Current Events
  Dogs and other Pets
  Electronics And Computers
  Food
  Health
  Just For Fun Off Topic
  Movies Music Games
  Personal Finance Investme
  Sports Outdoors
Tractorpoint Site
  Member Photos
  Site Members
  Website Operations Howto


New As Posted | Active Subjects



Click to Post a New Message!

Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Farming Ranching Agriculture Forum

Page [ 1 ] | 2 | | Next >>
Reply | Pop Up Window Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo
 03-01-2001, 15:42 Post: 24871
Stephen Kasten



Join Date:
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1

3
Filter by User
 Tractor for Wildflower Bed

I am interested in preparing a 1-acre field for planting wildflowers. It has never been plowed. What hp/weight compact tractor would be good for plowing and tilling this field? The work doesn't need to be done quickly. I have been looking at a JD4400 and NHTC35D. Can I go smaller? (I would also like to use the tractor for 60" belly mowing.) Also, what kind/size of plow and tiller would be recommended?






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us |
 03-01-2001, 16:33 Post: 24876
JeffM



Join Date:
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1

2
Filter by User
 Tractor for Wildflower Bed

Stephen, if you search through the archives there were some good posts in the past few months about preparing ground for gardens, lawns, etc., which is basically what you want to do. My opinion is that if you can get by with a smaller tractor, you can then use the money you save to buy more or better implements! A 25 hp tractor will work nicely for a 60" belly mower. A rototiller is an expensive implement if you are only going to use it once, might be better off trying to rent one. Others on this board have a lot of experience with subsoilers, plows, and other groundbreaking implements of destruction, so I'll leave that discussion to them.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us |
 03-01-2001, 16:52 Post: 24879
Bird Senter

TP Contributor

Join Date: Jun 1999
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 962

2
Filter by User
 Tractor for Wildflower Bed

Stephen, yes, you can go smaller; a 20-25hp tractor will do for a 60" mower, and personally, to prepare a planting area, I'd prefer plowing it first with a 12" or 14" moldboard (turning plow), then go over it with a tiller. There are a lot of good brands of tillers; I use a Bush Hog myself. Preferably get one wide enough to cover your rear tracks, although that isn't necessary if you get one that can be offset to one side and just cover the tracks on that side.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us |
 03-04-2001, 08:12 Post: 24985
PLK



Join Date:
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1

2
Filter by User
 Tractor for Wildflower Bed

Not to change the subject - but wildflower seed is best frost seeded this time of year as it is very dormant seed. It needs the freezing/thawing action to stratify the seed. The best bet is forget the plow - mow it this summer or burn it, kill the regrowth with Roundup,and broadcast the seed on frozen ground Feb./March. If you insist on plowing - don't cover the seed, just pack it in, but some of it may not germinate until the following spring.
A small tractor and brushhog type cutter is all you would need otherwise.
Good luck
PLK






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us |
 03-04-2001, 16:41 Post: 25020
Ted Kennedy



Join Date:
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1

3
Filter by User
 Tractor for Wildflower Bed

PLK is right, from my experience. I am assuming a lot when I say that Stephen is talking about perennial wild flower seeds. If that is the case, an even simpler method that requires no tractor at all is a match, just like PLK said. I burn the area for seeding late in the fall, and then broadcast the seeds prior to frost. I also recommend a cover of salt marsh hay to keep the birds from the seeds before the snow flies. It all mulches away come spring and when the first warm rays hit the area it doesn't take long to see results. Two years later, most have self-sown, and you'll find you have quite a few flowers on hand. Open ground does seem more of a sure thing, but it really isn't necessary.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us |
 03-07-2001, 15:44 Post: 25156
Stephen Kasten



Join Date:
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1

3
Filter by User
 Tractor for Wildflower Bed

Ted - Could you please explain more about burning a field of grass? (I am in East TN.) How dry does it need to be? Do you use accelerants? How do you keep it in the exact area you wish to burn without spreading? What is "salt marsh hay"? Is this something you plant, or something you buy and spread? Thanks for your help! - Steve






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us |
 03-08-2001, 05:50 Post: 25183
Ted Kennedy



Join Date:
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1

3
Filter by User
 Tractor for Wildflower Bed

Steve, not every state or town is the same when it comes to burning so you may not be allowed to burn, but if you are, here is the way it is safely done in my area. We have a volunteer fire department, this is a big help. Come the late Fall, not during drought, I flag the area I need to burn so everyone knows the area of containment. All of the vegetation in the area that is to be burned is kept no higher than a foot to provide fuel, and twenty feet outwards from the flags has been mown down to ground level to reduce the threat of the fire spreading. Never use an accelerant. Don't burn next to structures. The volunteers do the burning using flame thrower like torches, standing by with their tanker and pumper. As the fire reaches the flagged perimeter, they knock it down with the hose. They won't burn leaves, they just want the grass or other small brushy plants so as to keep the flames down. They do this on as near a windless day as possible. After the burn is over, one of the junior volunteers usually stays for the night to make sure nothing gets going again, the young guys love it! This is a service the volunteers provide for donation support, which I lavishly ($) and wholehearted support and the town allows by permit. I have great respect for the volunteers and am very proud and thankful for their help. Salt marsh hay is hay from the grass that grows in the marshes along the Eastern Seaboard, many make their living harvesting it for landscaping purposes. It comes in bales, square or rolled, depending on the supplier. We use salt marsh hay because what seeds may be present come from plant species that mostly won't grow in normal soil. Consequently, you aren't into weed problems caused from seeds found in hay baled from the same area's soil. You just spread it by hand, like feeding the chickens, cover every foot. You could rent a bale spreader, the kind you dump big hand-fulls into and it spreads the hay more quickly over large areas. I prefer to "feed the chickens". Also, salt hay seems to mulch faster, providing the wild flower (or lawn grass) seedlings with organic nutrients. The hay also keeps the birds from having a complete feast, they do get some seeds but not as many if you cover thoroughly. Marsh hay also helps prevent erosion. There is no need to roll the seeds down like a lawn. After winter is over, the seeds are ready and the seedlings come right up. An alternate method is to burn, sow your seeds, and put down a one inch top soil "dressing". I only do this if the client asks for it and is willing to pay for premium top soil, and I would still lay down the hay. Need to know more? Just ask and I'll be glad to help.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us |
 03-08-2001, 08:02 Post: 25191
Bird Senter

TP Contributor

Join Date: Jun 1999
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 962

2
Filter by User
 Tractor for Wildflower Bed

Ted, I sure know what you mean about the grass and weeds you get from ordinary hay. But of course over here in the middle of the country we don't have the salt marsh hay so we use wheat or oat straw that was cut and baled after the grain was harvested with a combine.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us |
 03-08-2001, 09:02 Post: 25194
Ted Kennedy



Join Date:
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1

3
Filter by User
 Tractor for Wildflower Bed

Thanks Bird, I am a regional landscaper and ignorant of how the rest of the country does most things I take for granted. I'll remember this and be sure to include it in future discussions as appropriate. Again, this is why I like coming to this forum, it expands my knowledge and that in and of itself is a positive thing. Thanks again, and personally, I think you and Murph help provide the glue that holds this thing all in perspective. You guys have never run a bulldozer over someone else, are literate and well spoken, and possess a clarity of thought and wealth of knowledge uncommon to today.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us |
 03-11-2001, 14:30 Post: 25359
PLK



Join Date:
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1

2
Filter by User
 Tractor for Wildflower Bed

Ted pretty much covered the burning subject, but I might add a few notes.
Burning is the best way to prepare for dormant seeding wildflowers and prairie grasses, however it is also the most dangerous! I made the mistake of trying to burn some switchgrass last spring without enough help and a sudden wind change soon sent a raging inferno racing cross country faster then a man can run!! Only with the help of friends with tractors and other equipment did we get it under control. You need lots of help and a wide area mowed close (or plowed ) that the fire can't jump. A backpack sprayer works well to put out fires that try to burn across the fire lane. Not trying to scare you but just a little advance warning to have plenty of help, watch the weather report, and be careful. In Iowa, we don't use mulch on large scale plantings, as the root system holds the soil and new growth quickly germinate's to provide ground cover. Enjoy your wildflowers!
PLK






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us |
Reply | Pop Up Window Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo


Page [ 1 ] | 2 | | Next >>

Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Farming Ranching Agriculture Forum

Thread 24871 Filter by Poster:
Annette 1 | Bird Senter 2 | Greg franklin 1 | JeffM 2 | PLK 2 | Stephen Kasten 3 | SteveT 1 | Ted Kennedy 3 |

 (advanced search)

Picture of the Day
Bick333

Grooming Mowers Finish Mowers - 914A 60  mid mount mower deck for sale in suffolk va 2002 model
914A 60 mid mount mower deck for sale in suffolk va 2002 model


Unanswered Questions

Belarus 825 - needs a new clut
Drain Cock
Need more hydraulic flow for s
HINOMOTO HB 501
Belarus 420A - Problems bleed

Active Subjects

460 Long hyd leak
460 axle
Key will not start engine
6x4 engine rebuild vsHarbor Fr
Things we say and what do they
The Plus and Minus of Ignoring
Looking to buy a New Pickup Tr
Need more hydraulic flow for s


Hot Topics

Tractor Category 1 2 3 Hitch s
Duerr hp 678 Chipper replaceme
Gator 620i gas in engine oil
KUBOTA Tractor Trouble Free Qu
Gator 6x4 Overheating problem
Duerr hp 678 Chipper Manual
Adjusting 7308 Pressure Relief
Long 460 hydraulic problem


Featured Suppliers

Mountain Creek Labradoodles
      MountainCreekLabradoodles.com





New Forums on Gun Sport Shooting and Hunting -- BarrelPoint.com  New Forums on Horses ManePoint.com
Talk Horses at ManePoint
Hunting + Gun Sports at BarrelPoint



Most Viewed

+ Online Used tractor price guide
+ dump truck or dump trailer
+ Do you lend your tractor
+ Just installed a Pat s Quick Hitch - Some comments
+ ever thought about moving
+ Best Manure Spreaders Review
+ TRACTOR TAX WRITE OFF
+ It s raining INSIDE my new Pole Barn
+ Hobby Farm Harvesting Equipment
+ Subsoiler in pasture

Most Discussion

+ dump truck or dump trailer
+ SW Michigan Relocation
+ Mahindra pricing versus JD Kab
+ ever thought about moving
+ Price of Goods to grower
+ Sisal and Plastic twine prices
+ Do you lend your tractor
+ Clover over septic field Good
+ My 8 acres farming lot only ha
+ Side-Hill Operaion

Newest Topics

+ Howdy Tractorpointers
+ Contaminated Hydraulic Oil
+ drill big holes
+ Sounds that normally mean bad news
+ Correct method to check Hydraulic oil levels
+ Sprayer GPM controls
+ JD 4066 with Backhoe attachment question
+ Potato diggers
+ sand point well
+ Hay or row crops
















Turbochargers for Tractors and Industrial Machines
Cab Glass for Tractors and Industrial Machines

Alternators for Tractors and Industrial Machines
Radiators for Tractors and Industrial Machines

Driveline Components for Tractors and Industrial Machines
Starter Motors for Tractors and Industrial Machines