Pushing snow backward damages hitch?: Yanmar Tractors  -- Other Tractor Brands Discussion Forum and Review Pushing snow backward damages hitch?: Yanmar Tractors -- Other Tractor Brands Discussion Forum

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 02-03-2008, 08:28 Post: 151051
auerbach



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 Pushing snow backward damages hitch?

Forgot where, but someone warned that rear-hitched attachments were meant to be pulled, not pushed, and pushing could pooch the hitch.

When I'm not moving snow I'm moving other heavy stuff, and use my blade a lot. I've modified the blade pivot to increase its maximum angle (so it's no wider than my track) and reinforced the weak point on the blade frame for when I'm pushing back with force. (Sorry if I'm not clear, but not important.)

For 35 years I've done more pushing than pulling. Has to do with manouvrability and keeping the wheels more level. With a weighted bucket and 4 chains, I sometimes push pretty hard.

Not arguing, just asking, what hitch damage am I risking?






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 02-03-2008, 11:29 Post: 151053
kwschumm



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 Pushing snow backward damages hitch?

The hitch linkages are stronger in tension than compression. Here's a cheesy analogy. If you suspended a 10 lb weight from a toothpick it would probably hold the weight. If you dropped a 10 lb weight on top of an upright toothpick it would bend and snap. 3ph links are like that. They bend fairly easy under compression.

Although not applicable to a plow, pushing rearward with a pto driven implement can be real expensive if the shaft bottoms out. It can thrust the shaft right into the pto drive.






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 02-03-2008, 12:08 Post: 151054
candoarms



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 Pushing snow backward damages hitch?

Auerbach,

Kwschumm is correct. It's nearly impossible to stretch the steel bars of the 3-point hitch, when pulling -- but it's quite easy to bend them, when pushing.

You won't bend the lower 3-point hitch bars when pushing, unless you run into an immovable object, such as a parking curb.

Before any damage takes place, the tractor will have to come to a sudden and unexpected stop. This happens quite often when moving snow, where immovable objects are usually hidden.

Joel






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 02-03-2008, 12:14 Post: 151055
auerbach



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 Pushing snow backward damages hitch?

I take your point about the PTO shaft, thanks, but from my miniscule engineering knowledge, structures have more resistance in compression than tension. But tension, as in your example, self-balances whereas compression can cause skew. A thin pillar can take the weight of a tall building, but only if the pillar's fixed so it can't move. That's why I took the side play out of my hitch.

Even a rope is stronger in compression. Hang increasing weights on, say, a 1" twisted metal rope until it inevitably fails. Now encase it in a thick, vertical 1"-ID column, like a shell in a barrel. Force the top of rope down until it fails or collapses. It won't until it melts. What am I missing?






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 02-03-2008, 12:22 Post: 151056
auerbach



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 Pushing snow backward damages hitch?

Thanks, Joel. The metal hitch bars would be stronger in compression only if they couldn't move while being compressed, but they can, and so would bend from pushing before they'd snap from pulling. Sorry to be so slow.






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 02-03-2008, 12:42 Post: 151058
candoarms



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 Pushing snow backward damages hitch?

Auerbach,

I believe you're making this far more complicated than it really is.

The lower three-point hitch is constructed of flat bar steel. If you place one of those bars in a stretcher, you'll find that they'll survive under many tons of stretching pressure. But, if you were to place one of those steel bars on end, in a shop press, you'd easily be able to bend them......likely with less than a ton of pressure.

Those flat steel bars are designed for pulling.....such as when attached to a plow, cultivator, ripper, etc. They are marginally acceptable when pushing, so long as you don't strike an immovable object.

When you strike an immovable object with the end of a wide blade, or snowblower, the forces are multiplied.

Joel






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 02-03-2008, 12:46 Post: 151059
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 Pushing snow backward damages hitch?

Auerbach; I do agree with the others here about the resistance of a bar being many times greater in a pulling mode compared to compression. Now in the real world if you have been doing it that way for 35 years and haven't hurt anything yet then you obviously are a carefull operator who is comfortable pushing things around, so why change now? Enjoy doing it the way you do it. Frank.






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 02-03-2008, 13:23 Post: 151060
kwschumm



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 Pushing snow backward damages hitch?

Steel can take an enormous compressive force, but it's maximized only when the compressive force is equalized throughout the material and lateral forces are eliminated. In practice, on a tractor that's nearly impossible to do. But the 3ph isn't made of glass. Frank is right, if you've been pushing for years and haven't bent or broke anything you're a careful operator doing it right.






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 02-03-2008, 14:03 Post: 151061
candoarms



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 Pushing snow backward damages hitch?

Auerbach,

Very few homeowners will ever damage a three-point hitch. The problem shows up pretty often with commercial tractors, where speed of operation is important, combined with an unfamiliar surrounding.

I've seen what happens to a three-point hitch after a tractor has struck a parking curb.....and it ain't pretty. One guy's seat looked like a recliner.....after he instantly came to a stop while backing at high speeds and hit a curb. The forces are incredibly high.

It's very important to wear a seatbelt when operating a tractor. Ask anyone who runs a skidsteer what happens when striking a curb while going forward. People have ended up lying on their backs on the ground, wondering what in the hell just happened to them. At first it's funny to hear the stories, until you realize what could have happened to them. There's a lot of lucky people who are still alive to share stories like these with the rest of us.

Joel






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 02-04-2008, 07:04 Post: 151078
auerbach



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 Pushing snow backward damages hitch?

Thanks guys -- appreciate the explanations and the cautions.






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Yanmar Tractors Forum

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auerbach 4 | candoarms 3 | Chief 2 | hardwood 2 | kwschumm 2 | Murf 1 |




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