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 07-14-2002, 08:52 Post: 40353
Peters

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 Thick Door Casing

I poured my basement with insulative concrete forms. The basement is currently separated into 3 rooms with concrete sub walls. I would like to place doors in the entrances to the other rooms, but the walls are 1 foot thick and will be another 1" thick with dry wall.
Factory door casing are for 6 and 4 inch walls.
Options: Cut normal casing and extend factory casing - Build casing from scratch and find door - narrow doorway and place casing in door
One area is the main path to the back door so I am adverse to narrowing too much.






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 07-14-2002, 09:13 Post: 40355
DavidJ



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 Thick Door Casing

If the openings were originally designed to have doors installed they should be wide enough to accomodate casings. Measure the width and it should be about 2" larger than the door size. One possibility is if the drywall is wrapped around the opening, that's taking up space that the casing needs. You will need to remove the drywall if that's the case before you install a casing.

Once you have the opening ready you could certainly remove the moulding from one side of a prehung unit and add a spacer piece to make up the thickness of the wall. You could also buy a door and make a frame of 1x10 or 1x12 lumber, whatever width you require and then place the moulding on that. I have seen it done both ways and either looks good. If you want to keep the door centered in the wall the latter would be my reconmmendation.

If indeed the openings do not allow for a frame because they were designed too small. you could use very thin veneer glued directly to the opening and stop strips glued to that. then anchor the hiinges directly into the wall. That will give you maximum width obtainable.






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 07-14-2002, 15:15 Post: 40365
Peters

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 Thick Door Casing

David;
The space is wide enough for a normal casing, but the casings are not deep enough to accomidate a 13" thick wall.
If I narrow the door opening to accomidate a normal stock casing then I will need to narrow the door way at lest 6 inches. As anything entering the basement will need to pass through this door and the outside door I would like to keep it at least 34" or 36". I think I will be down to 32 if I do this.
I made one casing for a closet using 1 x 6, but I did not think of the 1 x 12 or better yet 2 x 12 which would provide a strong support for the door an allow me to anchor it into the concrete.
Any other suggestions?






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 07-17-2002, 08:15 Post: 40445
TomG

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 Thick Door Casing

I'm probably missing something here. I thought a standard door opening accommodated wood framing inside the opening that a standard pre-hung door would fit into. The framing could extend across the entire width of the wall thickness.

I think that a pre-hung door could just be slipped into one side of the opening and the threshold would be in front of one side of the opening. Shims could be used to get the fit between the opening and casing right. I think the casings on the pre-hung doors are 1" wood, and additional 1" trim wood could be nailed onto the opening where it isn't covered by the door casing.

The installation would put the door on the surface of one side of the wall. It may seem a little unusual to reach about a foot into the wall to get to the door know form one side. However, you'd probably want the door on the outside of one surface anyway. If it were mounted in the centre of the wall, then the door couldn't open fully. Of course, itís a different problem if the opening in the concrete wall isnít large enough to accommodate rough framing into which the door could be set.






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 07-21-2002, 08:35 Post: 40554
Peters

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 Thick Door Casing

Tom;
A normal interior prehung door has a casing that separates in the middle. The casing has a tongue and slot to accomidate the slight differences in wall thicknesses. The trim around the door mounts to one edge of the door rough frame and the other trim slides in from the other side. (I am sure you have done this.) As the edges are smooth and square on each side of the casing you could dress out the middle of the door frame in the center of the door, but the casing has the deep groove which has no strength unless filled with the tongue.
I guess I could fill the groove with a thin piece of wood to prevent cracking.
The main problem with this solution is that the center of the rough opening is a solid cement wall. I would need to mount the center trim out board into cement. This sort of prevents using 1" lumber and makes it difficult to align etc.






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 07-21-2002, 15:03 Post: 40558
TomG

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 Thick Door Casing

Actually I was in the role of helper forthe only pre-hung door I've seen installed. Actually it is a 6" door in a 4" wall. We were in a hury to get a door on our wash-shed. A 6" door was at the building materials place byt a 4" door would have been ordered. The casing does stick out a bit from the wall on the inside. Well, it's only a wash-shed anyway, and how many sheds do you see with a proper insullated steel pre-hung door whether or not the casing fits the wall?

I suppose a nail gun would nail 1" boards to the concrete but the results may not look very good for a finished surface. In furniture making there's something called a loose tongue and groove. Both edges of boards to be joined are grooved and a strip of plywood is used for a tongue. the results are said to be stronger than solid tongues in many woods. I've made a few and the wood bearks before the joint fails. Anyway, it's a possibility.






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 07-22-2002, 11:37 Post: 40577
paul ruff



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 Thick Door Casing

I recently put an addition on to my house with the insulated concrete forms. what we did on the doors was the same we did for the windows by adding jam extentions to one side of the door frame, we mounted the doors so the hinge side was even with the wall and added the extention where needed.
paul






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 07-22-2002, 12:58 Post: 40578
Billy

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 Thick Door Casing

Do it like Paul said or right in the center and trim it out on both sides. I think it would look fine either way. Paul's suggestion would be cheaper and less work.

Billy






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Moldings Finish Trim Forum

Thread 40353 Filter by Poster:
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