TIRES AND WEIGHT NEED HELP! 
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 06-10-1999, 00:00 Post: 4961
D



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 TIRES AND WEIGHT, NEED HELP!

I need help, I will be purchasing a new compact soon and need to know the best way to set up the tractor to maximize stability on hilly terain. My property is 80% slope with pasture and woods. I have 750 ft + paved drive, also a fairly steep grade, which will require snow removal. I will not be using the tractor on my lawn. I can not decide on R1's or R4's since I have no experience with either one. I know R1's would max traction but would the lower and wider R4's add stability on hillsides and would they work as well as R1's in the snow. Also, would filling the tires add more stability than weights or is either way just as good? I dont mind spending the extra cash for rear weights if it means less hassel in the future. I plan to use rear mount mower for pasture since it is clean an relatively smooth and rear blade for snow removal. Any experienced comments or opinions on tire and weight setup for my situation would br greatly appreciated!!!






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 06-11-1999, 00:00 Post: 4966
Jack in IL



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 TIRES AND WEIGHT, NEED HELP!

If you had the same amount of liquid weight or cast wheel weight, the effect on stability and traction would be the same for either. Cast weight is a lot less hassle--see many recent posts on this. The tires should be set in the widest position front and rear for best stability. It seems as if your description of requirements indicates that traction on your paved driveway during snow removal may be the most demanding requirement. I don't think there is a clear cut answer on tires here. In fact any tire, (ag, turf, or industrial) may require chains in deep snow on hills. Note that slipping tire chains on paved surfaces will leave some scratch marks. My neighbor uses chains on a lawn and garden tractor and there are marks left in his level asphalt driveway from pushing snow.






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 06-11-1999, 00:00 Post: 4970
Dave



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 TIRES AND WEIGHT, NEED HELP!

Have someone with experience (dealer maybe) look at your property. If your property really has 80% slopes don't even consider a tractor. 80% slopes are way beyond the safe limit. My guess is you did some miscalculating on the slope.






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 06-11-1999, 00:00 Post: 4975
Brent



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 TIRES AND WEIGHT, NEED HELP!

Maybe he means 80% of his property is sloped.






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 06-11-1999, 00:00 Post: 4979
Dave



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 TIRES AND WEIGHT, NEED HELP!

If you do mean that 80% of your land is sloping never mind my prior post.






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 06-11-1999, 00:00 Post: 4982
MichaelSnyder

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 TIRES AND WEIGHT, NEED HELP!

I agree with Jacks advise for the most part. IMHO the main advantage to Liquid in thetires is "CHEAPER" COST. Again, IMHO Cast weights are MUCH better in many ways. 1st you can easilyalter the amount,effects, placement of the weight. Cast Weights can't spring a leak like Liquid in your tires can.Causing rusted rims, ruined grass, Polluted streams that your animals drink from (you mentioned its a pasture) and lastly they are not a mess to deal with, only Heavy!Down side=$. I would also suspect that the reason most farmers use Liquid is that they have 2-3 or more tractors. You don't want to switch weights everyday, nor could they afford Cast weights forevery single tractor. Your case of 1 compact tractor, I would opt for the Cast.R4 Ind tires will provide better floatation,wear,Durability than the Ag R1s. I would prefer the R4s because I feelthey are a very good compromise for most traction conditions. You didn't mention how steep these hills are, but Steep Hills & Compromises should not be used in the same sentence.If the angle of your "hills" are something your pick-up could handle (go R4s), Otherwise my I recommend the R1s.Better yet, have your dealer bring a demo model to your place. If he won't, find a new dealer.You are spending ALOT of money, the least he can do is allow even a brief demo.






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 06-11-1999, 00:00 Post: 4991
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 TIRES AND WEIGHT, NEED HELP!

YES! 80% of my property is sloped not my property has 80% slope, That would be one monster hill!






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 06-11-1999, 00:00 Post: 4997
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 TIRES AND WEIGHT, NEED HELP!

OK I decided on cast weight! Now I guess my main concerns are traction in the winter and stability on the pasture hills in the summer. I'm not sure what you mean by my pickup on the hills, but my pickup can handel any place in the pasture (without snow) and the driveway in the winter is only a challenge for it in heavy snow (heavy snow is rare most snow falls are about 2 to 6 inches, southwest PA) My thoughts are if I need chains on R1's for the driveway in the winter (not concerned about chain marks, driveway is more like a road than a driveway, 2" modified binder) than maybe I should get the R4's since it seems to me they would be more stable (not as tall and wider) than R1's. Do you think the R4's add stability to a compact? Have you had experiences with both types of tire? Demo sounds like a good idea.






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 06-12-1999, 00:00 Post: 5013
Roger L



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 TIRES AND WEIGHT, NEED HELP!

I would go for the R1 tires and have a set of chains made all the way around. A bald tire plus chains will beat any lug tire. If they fit well, you can leave themon for the snowy half of the year. I've done this with turf tires on both ofmy tractors for the past 20 years without any problem at all. I live in theRocky Mountains with lots of steep slopes and snow.Cast weights are better, and probably no one will disagree with this. You ask aboutcenter of gravity. Yes, the liquid has a lower CG. Not by much....a couple of inches is typical. The CG of the weights is the center of the axle. The CG ofthe fluid is where half the mass is above and below a horizontal plane. Sincetires are filled with an air space left at the top of the tire, the CG of the liquid must be lower than the axle. Good luck. These compacts make work into fun. If there is a bad one on the market I'm not aware of it....so even shopping and buying is fun. Roger L






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 06-12-1999, 00:00 Post: 5014
Roger L



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 TIRES AND WEIGHT, NEED HELP!

I would go for the R1 tires and have a set of chains made all the way around. A bald tire plus chains will beat any lug tire. If they fit well, you can leave themon for the snowy half of the year. I've done this with turf tires on both ofmy tractors for the past 20 years without any problem at all. I live in theRocky Mountains with lots of steep slopes and snow.Cast weights are better, and probably no one will disagree with this. You ask aboutcenter of gravity. Yes, the liquid has a lower CG. Not by much....a couple of inches is typical. The CG of the weights is the center of the axle. The CG ofthe fluid is where half the mass is above and below a horizontal plane. Sincetires are filled with an air space left at the top of the tire, the CG of the liquid must be lower than the axle. Good luck. These compacts make work into fun. If there is a bad one on the market I'm not aware of it....so even shopping and buying is fun. Roger L






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Tractor Tires Forum

Thread 4961 Filter by Poster:
Brent 1 | D 3 | Dave 2 | Farminlady 1 | Jack in IL 1 | MichaelSnyder 2 | Roger L 2 |




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