Water Filled Tires
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 12-11-1998, 00:00 Post: 388




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 Water Filled Tires

I am buying a New Holland Boomer with R4 tires and would like to hear comments regarding filling the tires with water or other material. It will have a loader. And, I live in a southern climate with little chance of freezing.






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 12-11-1998, 00:00 Post: 389




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 Water Filled Tires

I am not sure about pure water per se, but calcium chloride solution can add several hundred pounds of weight to your rear end, improving traction. This is especially useful for loader work, where the loader load will pull down and lessen the weight on you rear end. I don't use calcium, instead preferring wheel weights. You might also consider antifreeze instead of calcium. It is said to be a bit lighter but, especially if put in tubeless tires, will be less reactive with the metal rims. Also many brands of antifreeze will have rust inhibiters as part of their formulation. Hope this helps.

Lee






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 12-11-1998, 00:00 Post: 390




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 How do you get rid of the air?

If you fill tubeless tires with a liquid, how do you get rid of the air? It seems like you would have possible wheel balance probs if the tire was partially full at certain speeds, and oxygen mixed with water or some other liquid would seem like a sure cause for corrosion. I can understand filling tubes with liquid, but not tubeless.






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 12-11-1998, 00:00 Post: 391
dennis



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 How do you get rid of the air?

Calcium Cloride is such a common use for filling tires that Dow Corning lists this use right on the bag ahead of using calcium chloride for ice removal. If you fill your tires you will have to deal with the weight in total at all times, like during repairs or maintenance, also if you mow you will have too much weight for finish mowing work. If mowing is one of your objectives you could condsider wheel weights or 3PH weight which will give you traction and counter balance for loader work, and be easy to remove when not needed.






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 12-12-1998, 00:00 Post: 393




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 Water Filled Tires

Calicum filled rear tires (75% max) will probably give you the cheapest and most practiced alternative to rear ballast. Wheel weights tend to be more expensive, provide less ballast, but are easier to work with and adjust. Calicum filled tires normally give more weight (example- my L3600 gained 581 lbs per tire), but are more difficult to work with during removal or track adjustment. The tire dealer that filled my tires recommended the calicum alternative but only after he had installed tubes.

Your choice should be dependent on the necessity of flexibility of rear wheel maintenance, expected loader weight work, general tractor use, and cost. Good luck.






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 12-12-1998, 00:00 Post: 394
Bob/NJ



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 Water Filled Tires

If your going to do any kind of tillage you must have wheel weight especially with the loader up front because you will loose rear traction with a loader, the Boomer is a small machine and will knock you around alot with the hard heavy tires filled with water ballast, Ive tried it both ways and I will stick with water ballast at 75% full.






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 12-13-1998, 00:00 Post: 397
Farminlady



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 Water Filled Tires

Hey Tex, just have your dealer fill the tires with the calcium solution. Mine are filled, I've got plenty of traction, and I only occasionally lift the rear end off the ground :-} The TC 29 with the filled tires balances pretty well, in all seriousness. I've been carrying FULL bucket loads of a silt clay mix that is very heavy, downhill, through the mud, and no problems. It gives me better traction than the C530 with a hoe on the back and wheel weights!






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 12-14-1998, 00:00 Post: 410




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 How do you get rid of the air?

Frankly, I'm not sure. I know Agco has the habit of doing it and my dealer offered to put calcium in the tractor I just bought, which has tubeless tires. My guess is that once the bead is set, the air is let out and the fluid is squirted in. The remaining air will compress at the top of the tire. That is not a problem, as no tire is completely filled with fluid. My owner manual says the fluid level should not come above 75% of the tire height. As far as stability goes (particularly at traveling speeds), I hear what you say. It doesn't appear to be a problem as I do not believe the practice, as described above, has appreciably changed over the years.

Lee






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 12-14-1998, 00:00 Post: 415




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 Water Filled Tires

To save your rims from rusting out in the future. Fill your tires with antifreeze or windshield washer fluid.






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 12-15-1998, 00:00 Post: 428




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 How do you get rid of the air?

Check out Gemplers catalog. They have a tool for injecting water into a tire. The catalog has all kinds of usef stuff.www.gemplers.com. i don't work for them, I have bought stuff from them and have been very happy

carl






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Tractor Tires Forum

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