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 01-23-2006, 07:23 Post: 123262
kthompson



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There was another thread here on how to know the tipping point on a tractor. One thing pointed out there was not being caught off guard.

Saturday a week ago a person was killing in my county while operating a tractor. THey were cutting trees and he was using the tractor to pull them in the direction he wanted them to fall.

I don't have the exact details but to begin with the wind was blowing that day here very strong at 20 or so mph.

He ran into a stump while pulling the tree and it caught the tractor. It has been told it just stopped the tractor and been told that rolled the tractor. Either way it did stop. He was pulling with short enough cable the tree landed on him and the tractor.

This probably was a tractor with no roll bar and was a full size farm tractor.

In the other thread it was pointed out the unexpected is where most get hurt.

I was told years ago we must learn from other's mistakes. We can not afford to make them all our self. Such is this.

Think, think, think, and that helps keep the odds in your favor.






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 01-23-2006, 09:19 Post: 123269
hardwood

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I'd say that most of the tractor related deaths that I remember in our neighborhood had to do with felling a tree or moving logs or stumps. I've been guilty of doing some things with trees and a tractor that weren't real smart in the past. A safety reminder is good for all of us no matter how long we've been at it. Frank.






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 01-23-2006, 09:55 Post: 123274
Peters

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I am never in favor of pulling over a tree. Unless it is absolutely necessary. Too many bad things can happen. If you have to pull a tree in wrong direction, you need to reduce it weight as much as possible.
Falling trees is an art and takes time to learn. Naturally you can learn a lot from reading but the art aspect is learned from other artists.
When I was working on the west coast, falling was a 1 in 100 proposition of buying the farm in a year. To stay falling you needed to learn quickly.






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 01-23-2006, 13:35 Post: 123284
kthompson



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I have pulled a fair amount of trees with tractor when felling them. But I have always had clear ground to set the tractor on and cable long enough if the tractor never moved the tree could not hit the tractor.

Not throwing off on anyone, it pays to be so careful and take the time to plan, look and look and plan again. Many of us have had at least one, "THANK YOU LORD" experience.






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 01-23-2006, 15:30 Post: 123295
SG8NUC



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I have cut numerous large trees pines, oaks, gums 50' and greater. I have pulled each and everyone, in tight areas, have had close calls and learned. The best method I found was a block and tackle and a right angle from the tree to be felled. Traction is a key. Pre load the nylon, a 25 to 30hp tractor on dirt will not break this line. THree strand Nylon line breaks at 6 to 7 thousand lbs. It will stretch and is very forgiving but will give you a rubber band effect and actualy pull you in the line of fire. Three strand Nylon line will stretch twice its length before breaking. When it breaks it will snap back and have the power to kill, anything on the end will inhance this effect. Plan out your escape route and make sure it is clear.






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 01-29-2006, 22:22 Post: 123747
WillieH



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SG8NUC -

You point out a very very good point that I am sure many do not execute prior to involving themselves with the task - PLAN THE ESCAPE ROUTE.

I personally would much rather take an extra ten minutes making triple sure that I had a way out, should the unfortunate occasion arise, than to be pinned, crushed of impaled.

Here is a classic example:
A friend of mine decided to put in a pole barn. He planned on doing all of his own excavating. That's fine, nothing wrong so far. He rents an excavator for the weekend (weekend warrior - worst kind) and promptly gets started.

Hmmm, that tree is in the way - he says. Well, I could get my chainsaw and cut it, but what the heck...I'm in an EXCAVATOR - I'll just knock it over. But wait he thinks...I'll get my wife to slowly rotate the excavator while I cut the tree, so that the wind won't drop the tree in the wrong spot.

Fortunately, he thought better about the wife helping, and that idea was a very short lived solution!
He then went along with his first idea, and proceded to fell the tree with the boom of the excavator, and down she went....

... and down she went on the nose and roof of their motorhome that was deemed "out of the way"!

As the old addage goes, "Better be safe than sorry" truely applies to property, as well as personal being! STAY SAFE

- Willie H






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 01-30-2006, 07:39 Post: 123759
Peters

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I stand by my first statement. I would not pull a tree unless I absolutely had to. If it is a lot of problems I would limb it (with my spurs) and reduce the weight before pulling dropping the trunk. I have only pulled 3 trees over the thousands I have dropped. The rest I wedged over. Two were large white pine leaning over buildings and the other was a western red cedar I had to pick put to of the middle of a forest and it was leaning the wrong direction.
When you place force on trunks before the cut is ready other things can happen like barber chairing.
Below is what Husqvarna provides with their saws. They tend to only deal with one type of tree. The other larger BC guide is a better also a starting point. Beyond that you need to learn from someone that is experienced. Trial and error can be very costly in that business.






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Tractor Safety: Be-Safe

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 01-30-2006, 09:12 Post: 123768
DennisCTB

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 Be Safe

I bought a 150 foot tree felling rope specially made for this purpose that I put on trees up about 12 or more feet up the trunk or as high as I can get it for max leverage. I only use it on eastern trees that are about 60 feet tall. I wedge cut the tree, leaving a felling hinge and use a felling wedge. I ussually have an assistant or two pull on the rope by hand to make sure it goes as planned. I never use a tractor for this and anyone pulling is well out of range by a long margin when pulling on the tree.






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 01-30-2006, 09:39 Post: 123770
kthompson



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I think Dennis made a point that can be over looked. Our eastern trees are not as big as many of the western shore ones. If you were to think you could just pull over even a large limbed eastern hardwood you would have problems. Also the term pulling one over may be being used to different degrees. If a tree is large, leaning 45 degrees from where you want it to fall, your options are very limited.

I think I know what I can and cannot do. That is why the real large trees around family members houses we brought in a tree removal professional that did take them down in sections, ecept the smaller one which he pulled with his tractor.

Our local power company uses a rope and pulley and pull their trees by hand. That tells you they are not pulling anything of real size.

One thing I would like to point out here, if you have never cut a tree with no limbs it falls faster and hits harder than one with limbs does.

With all of this talk on how dangerous or foolish you are for doing so...how about those machines that grab a tree, cut it and lay it down. They are not just cutting 20 foot tall toothpicks.

Think, be safe.






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Tractor Safety Forum

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