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 07-29-1999, 00:00 Post: 6413
Bob



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 Trailer for hauling tractor

This may not be the right area to ask this, I am new to this board, but have found great advice here. I am looking for advice on a trailer for hauling a Kubota 2710 w/ loader and finish mower. Most of the hauling will be short local trips. I am sure I need a 16' tandem trailer, but not sure of what options are best. Full width ramp vs. split ramps, brakes on both axles vs. one axle vs. none, break-a-way needed, metal rail vs. stake pockets and make my own rail, etc. Some trailers are rated 5,000#, others rated 7000#. Any advice from trailer owners out there would be greatly appreciated.






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 07-30-1999, 00:00 Post: 6432
Dave R



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 Trailer for hauling tractor

Bob i recently had to make same decision.I bought 16' w/2' dovetail makes length 18'.4' ramps work fine and store in slot between dovetail.elec. Dual axle w/elec. brakes on 1 axle.7000 lb cap.Pressure treated floor,15"wheels,2"coupler andjack set back far enough to open tailgate as well as e z ramp storage sold me.Dealer told me stake pocket trs. were heavier duty than those w/rails.He said rails were neccessary to add strength on lighter trs.I paid 1295 + 190 for elec brake hook-up.I also had Tibraun brand spring boosters added to my 1/2 ton chevy 2wd, $200 more.This rig works well for me as i mostly do short runs.You do know its back there though and caution is the order of the day.I've had it on interstate @ 60 mph and thats as fast as i care to go.Good luck, Dave






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 07-30-1999, 00:00 Post: 6433
Jack in IL



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 Trailer for hauling tractor

I have a setup very similar to the one Dave describes and it works quite well for hauling my equipment. One difference is that I use 6 foot loading ramps that store under the dovetail. I like the longer ramps to provide clearance for belly mounted mower decks and for the rear 3 point hitch implements. If you select the fold-down type ramps, be sure they are strong enough for the weight of your equipment. Many of them are light duty and intended for loading garden tractors or commercial walk-behind mowers that weigh less than a CUT with loader, deck, and 3 point implement. I pull it with a Tahoe with 4WD. It is definitely a load, but it is stable. I have traveled as far as 500 miles loaded with no problems.






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 07-30-1999, 00:00 Post: 6443
Shawn in OK



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 Trailer for hauling tractor

Bob,I agree with the other posts. Only thing to add is that you've got to have brakes on the trailer unless your pulling with a fairly large truck. Electric brakes are least expensive, but remember, you've also got to have a controller installed in the truck.Since I'm pulling with a light weight truck (Explorer) that I plan on trading in fairly soon, and I also pull this trailer around on my property with my tractor carrying limbs, rocks, and other junk, I opted for the more expensive surge brakes on both axles. It takes a lot to get the trailer going when pulling it with my JD4200 loaded on, but you can't even tell it's there when it comes to stopping. Also, if you plan on keeping your trailer for a while, definately get the pressure treated lumber (or more expensive tread plate) unless you want to replace the deck after a few years. FYI 18' x 83" tandem axle, 7000#, surge brakes both axles, 4' heavy duty ramps, pressure treated lumber, 15" wheels (new, some manufactures use reconditioned wheels), $1,524. Good luck!






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 07-30-1999, 00:00 Post: 6450
Bob



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 Trailer for hauling tractor

Thanks for all of the useful info! I realize I have even more to think about than I realized. Further question about the brakes. I have a F150, 2wd with towing package. This includes a 7-pin plug, which I assumed meant I could work electric brakes. Does this still mean I need a controller in the truck, as Shawn states? Also, Shawn, can you tell me what surge brakes are and how they work?I looked at a 16' trailer today, P/T deck, split fold down ramps, elec. brake on one axle, 5000# cap., stake pockets, manufactured by Currahee out of Ga. Initial price $1395. Anyone familiar with this brand, and does this price sound in line?






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 07-30-1999, 00:00 Post: 6454
bo



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 Trailer for hauling tractor

surge brakes are brakes controlled with a cylinder in the coupler that hooks on your trailer hitch ball. When you stop your truck the trailer keeps moving forward and activates the hydraulic plunger which moves brake fluid to the brake pads and subsequently stops your trailer. they don't work in reverse. If you tend not to use your trailer often or do not service your brakes regularly then a flushing of the trailer brake system with silicone brake fluid and filling with silicone brake fluid tends to make the brakes function better in the long haul. Dot 3 attracts water and eventually corrodes the system






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 07-30-1999, 00:00 Post: 6458
Alan L.



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 Trailer for hauling tractor

Bob - you didn't mention whether the finish mower is a belly or 3-point, however I too have a B2710 with loader. I also have a 3-point finish mower and a rotary cutter. I bought a new 16' tandem trailer (5000#) with NO brakes, and 5' ramps for $900. I pull it with a 4WD Suburban and don't have much problem stopping it, but I can tell its back there when I stop. I live in a small town and typically haul the tractor 6 miles to my 24 acre property. Most of the time it has the cutter on it, which is much longer than the finishing mower and hangs off the back of the trailer a little. I couldn't use the fold up ramps for that reason. I just throw them up on the trailer and drop the cutter on them to keep them from falling off the trailer while moving.If I was driving in a lot of traffic I would definately go for the trailer brakes, but I don't need them in my situation. I especially didn't want any braking equipment inside my truck. I don't regret buying the "economy" trailer, it has worked just fine.






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 08-03-1999, 00:00 Post: 6581
CaseyR



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 Trailer for hauling tractor

While it appears from your comments that your towing package included the necessary electrical wiring, it may not have included the actuator that actually causes the electric brakes to activate. This is a usually a small black box about 1 x 3 x 6 inches or so that has four wires (at least) coming out of it and perhaps a slide switch in the front. It is hooked to the brake light switch and to the trailer brakes. When electricity is sent to the brake lights, a relay in the activator energizes the electrical circuit to the brakes. One thing that some people like about the electric brakes is that you can gently press on the brake peddle and activate just the trailer brakes. This can be handy under certain circumstances. There is available a breakaway unit to activate electric trailer brakes if the trailer were to break away, but most trailers I have seen do not have these. The complaint some people have with surge brakes is that it can make the trailer difficult to back up - particularly up a hill when loaded. I think there some surge brake units are available that have some time of lockout feature to prevent the brakes from locking up when backing - however, I have never actually seen them. I assume that silicon brake fluid would be OK for a trailer, but many auto manufacturers recommend that it not be used in their cars. Silicon fluid can reportedly cause the brakes to get very spongy when they get hot. My trailer has axles and brakes that were made for moving factory built houses. These are very heavy duty, but as I am finding out, they are non-standard items. The local wholesale trailer supply store does not carry parts for them. The tires are also unique in that they are 15.5 x 7 and most tire stores do not carry them and they cannot be mounted using some standard tire mounting equipment.






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 08-29-1999, 00:00 Post: 7446
Bob Forsha



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 Trailer for hauling tractor

In posting about the trailer axles made from moblie home axles is a good point. I would avoid buying a trailer with this type of axle. I worked in the moblie home industry for 15 years and speak from experience. The off size tires and type of rim to hub attachment is the main concern. Its easy to check if its a mobile home axle. The rim the tire is on is like a donut (no holes in the rim)like a carlug nuts and it has a type of wedge and bolt system to attach the rim.The problems with MH axles.A lot of the tires are dry rotten and the 14.5 tires are no longer allow in some states. So there are a lot of old tires floating around so beware!If you no not set the wedges so the tire is attached evenly to the hub you will get uneven tire wear. If all wedges and lugs are not tight you will have a rim flying off at hi-way speeds.Last the axle is 8'-6" wide or more. It had to be cut down to make it legal for hi-way use. Make sure its welded together correctly and strong.The backing plates are very cheap. No total cover for the brakes and magnets so road dirt and debris is a problem. This added to magnet wear and severe rusting of the steel backing plate for the magnet to attach to during braking. This will over time reduce braking ability of the trailer brakes and add to maintenance.Last thoughtStick with a Dexter axle used in better factory build units. Any RV dealer will have magnets and brakes in stock and the cost is far less. Any auto tire will work and no parts hunting needed.






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Tractor Implements Forum

Thread 6413 Filter by Poster:
Alan L. 1 | bo 1 | Bob 2 | Bob Forsha 1 | CaseyR 1 | Dave R 1 | Jack in IL 1 | Shawn in OK 1 |




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