pallet forks: Tractor Implements  -- Tractor Attachments Implements 3ph Discussion Forum and Review pallet forks: Tractor Implements -- Tractor Attachments Implements 3ph Discussion Forum

  parts   |   manuals   |   discussion   |   photos   |   podcast   |   reviews   |   specs   |   dealers   |   classifieds   |   contact   |   faq   |   myProfile   |   home          Login Now | Sign Up


FAQ:   What is a tractor?

Forum Index
New As Posted | Active Subjects



www.emerichsales.com - New & Used Equipment
          View Tractors For Sale!


www.partsbynet.com - Lawn and Garden Equipment Parts


Bernardsville Landscape Lighting
Click to Post a New Message!

Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Tractor Implements Forum

Page [ 1 ] | 2 | | Next >>
Reply | Pop Up Window Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo
 05-15-2003, 11:32 Post: 54924
plots1

TP Contributor

View my Photos

View my Photos  Pics
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: mo
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 563
 pallet forks

made me a set of pallet forks, all I need now is a hyd top link .looked at one here close to home but the shaft had a bend in it , guy only wanted 5 dollars he said it could be fixed for 35 dollars as he had to do it before.I didn't get it , though i could get one that didn't need fixing for about that price.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Technorati | Furl | Stumble This

 05-15-2003, 12:51 Post: 54931
Peters

TP Contributor

View my Photos

View my Photos  Pics
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Northern AL
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 3034
 pallet forks

You might be supprised I believe that a Hydraulic top link is more than that.
Good call on the used one though. I don't know of any one that has repaired on and had long term success. They are harded and straighening tend to weaken them. If not perfectly straight seal will wear abnormally and eventually leak.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Technorati | Furl | Stumble This

 05-16-2003, 06:22 Post: 54961
TomG

TP Contributor

Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Upper Ottawa Valley
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 5406

4
Filter by User
 pallet forks

Straightening a shaft with a hydraulic press won't restore strength. The only way to restore the original strength of this kind of part is to rework it hot or cold, which is virtually impossible due to the hard-surface plating on most shafts. Even so, a reworked shaft probably wouldn't end up at the original diameter. The cylinder is essentially junk except for applications much lighter than the original use and it is priced accordingly.

At least around here, I'd expect used top-link cylinders to be pretty rare so maybe you have good luck if there's a choice. They do need to be the right length and have loop ends. Sleeves sometimes are available to size common sized loops to CAT I pin sizes and something like that might increase the choices among used cylinders.

Length is important. My top-link cylinder came as part of my 3ph forklift and it has CAT II loops supplied with sleeves. The cylinder is a bit long, which means I can roll the box way back on its rear cutter for compacting but I can't get very aggressive cuts. Works out well though, I compact with it a lot and I also avoid aggressive cuts since my traction is limited due to turf tires.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Technorati | Furl | Stumble This

 05-16-2003, 08:51 Post: 54980
DRankin



View my Photos

View my Photos  Pics
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Northern Nevada
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 5105
 pallet forks

Tom.... your comment about limited traction with your turf tires got me thinking. I would bet that if you could change to a more aggressive tire that you would get worse traction.

I have switched back and forth with both tractors and what I have found is that the ag tires will start spinning sooner(even on a gravel road) and when the do spin, instead of making a little skid like the turfs do, they dig a hole.

And they dig that hole faster than you can get your foot of the gas pedal.

I have left "chevrons" in my gravel drive just driving over it with R-1's; no work being done, just passing through leaves discernible ruts.

They are still the tire of choice for mud and wet pasture land, but a lousy choice for grading a gravel road.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Technorati | Furl | Stumble This

 05-16-2003, 10:08 Post: 54985
Murf

TP Contributor

View my Photos

View my Photos  Pics
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Toronto Area, Ontario, Canada
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 7012
 pallet forks

I agree with you Mark, I have always run turf's on all the 'light' (tractors, etc.) equipment, I recently got a Kubota with R4's on it for puttering around the house. It is HST not gear-drive so that may have an effect also, but I discovered in touching up the driveway and such that it has no where near the traction that the comparable unit had on turf's.

Unless your tires sink down into the surface you are trying to get traction from the big lugs (and the resulting lug face area) do nothing for you, in the case of a relatively firm surface, turf included, you need many small lugs to give you a little bite each resulting in superior traction. The fact that the rubber used to make turf's is a lot softer than that used to make R4's is probably alot to do with it also, especially in the cold when R4's are notoriously slippery.

Best of luck.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Technorati | Furl | Stumble This

 05-17-2003, 05:26 Post: 55010
TomG

TP Contributor

Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Upper Ottawa Valley
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 5406

4
Filter by User
 pallet forks

Yes, I believe it's true that turfs can have more traction than ags. Some of my box work is on new ground and ags probably would be an advantage. I doubt the tractor has the weight to sink lugs into compacted gravel drives so the turfs likely are better. When I cut down the grade on the drive last summer it probably would have been a toss-up. I don't think there's any contest on ice.

Actually, the 6' 750-lbs. box for my 24-hp tractor probably is the greater traction challenge but I like the greater width. The times I want a more aggressive cut are when working shallow excavations. When working grades, an aggressive cut fills the box too fast and leaves divots in the nice straight grade I'm trying to work. I tend to use the rear cutter for cutting down hillocks, and the cylinder length is about right for adjusting the rear cutter angle. The traction isn't quite enough to drag full boxes of gravel out of a pile but it will drag them as long as I'm not on 6" of loose gravel. Don't know if ags would do any better.

All in all, the box and turfs probably would be my set up of choice even if that's not what I already have. R4's might be of some interest to me due to their greater load ratings but I don't know how they'd compare to turfs on ice. I run minimum tire pressures during the winter to gain traction. I don't know if the same thing works with the stiffer R4's. R4's would jar my teeth on the road though.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Technorati | Furl | Stumble This

 05-24-2003, 19:01 Post: 55489
marklugo



View my Photos

View my Photos  Pics
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Tifton, GA
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 281
 pallet forks

Turfs reduce ground pressure per sq inch but not necesarily improve the tractive ability of a tire. Although not an engineer, I will step out on a limb with the saw between the tree and me. A properly inflated R-1 is superior in traction in 90 % of the cases. Recently there has ben much discussion about sliding down hills in turns. This is a charachteristic of turfs, not ags. Lets put this in perspective. Race cars run slick tires on dry pavement to get more contact with the ground to provide traction. Would this work in real world conditions? One any one really put slicks on their car to drive day to day? No, they would prefer the checkered or v type patterns provided by most modern radial tires. This provides better traction on wet, and loose surfaces. Well this applies in the areas of tractors as well. On hard surfaces, you would see some improvement in an equal sized turf in traction but on skiddable surfaces, the advantage is lost and T-1's loose their appeal. The main use of turf tires began on golf courses many eons ago to prevent breakage and permanent damage to the crowns of the plants where all the undifferentiated tissue is. It was not to improve traction. In fact many courses did and still do add chains at various times to improve traction. A few smart salesmen had a few extra tires to sell and put them on tractors and advertised them as turf specials. The idea caught on because nobody wanted to be left behind on the band wagon. Are there legitimate uses for turfs? Yes, but their broad application to anything with a diesel engine with a three point hitch has been well over done. Try to recall what real farmers use as a rule of thumb.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Technorati | Furl | Stumble This

 05-25-2003, 08:00 Post: 55527
TomG

TP Contributor

Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Upper Ottawa Valley
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 5406

4
Filter by User
 pallet forks

True enough MarkL. Turfs do reduce pressure per square inch but they also add more square inches. Ags on surfaces where the lugs don't sink in put higher pressure on the ground but there are fewer square inches in contact. Floatation tires are even more extreme than turfs and they don't have much traction at all. It probably would take an engineer to calculate coefficients of friction and those would be different for different surfaces.

I think the main thing is that the tires should be the best the match for the work that has to be done. A case for any type tire can be made and they'll all have problems in some jobs but they'll be different types of problems. Part of what tire works best probably is which sorts of problems an operator is used to dealing with.

I don't think there's any question that ags have far better traction on surfaces where the lugs sink in and that would apply to sliding down hills as well as plowing. I imagine farmers use ags because they do a lot of heavy draft work on soft ground and they don't drive on lawns much. They also are the ones that talk about tire chains for snow plowing.

I don't need chains myself although it's true that I mostly use a blower after the gravel freezes. I don't have a comparison but I believe my turfs are better than ags on ice. My box scraper is a bit oversized for the tractor and traction is only a minor problem on the packed drive. Wish I had a comparison I don't know if ags would be better or not. I've wished for ags sometimes but overall I think the work I have to do goes easiest with my turfs.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Technorati | Furl | Stumble This

 05-25-2003, 17:39 Post: 55545
AC5ZO

TP Contributor

View my Photos

View my Photos  Pics
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Rio Rancho, NM 87144
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 928

2
Filter by User
 pallet forks

Mark and Tom, you have both said things that are right. Turfs do spread the area and cause less pressure on the ground. Therefore, they damage grass much less than an AG tire. R1 tires work because they do have very high force on the small lug area causing it to sink into soft ground. Once that the lugs have dug in, friction is very high because the lugs are "meshed" with the soil like gearteeth.

Friction in engineering terms is defined as the weight on the wheel multiplied by the coefficient of friction of rubber to surface. In basic engineering terms, one might think that the friction would be the same for both tires since they are both rubber and should generate the same friction forces for a given weight, but on some surfaces, the turf will win. On smoother, hard surfaces the turf will have a larger contact patch that will hold the surface while the R1 lugs may bend and start to roll over leading to slippage. Turfs will be much like the "slick" analogy. Ag tires will win the race on soft soil where you are not worried about leaving tracks.

What do I use on my tractor?? R-4s. They do less damage to fragile soil and turf but still get plenty of traction in my desert soil. R1 tires can be very uncomfortable around here, because on hard ground, they will jar your teeth as the lugs hit the hardpan and cannot sink in. Driving with R4 tires is fairly comfortable even on pavement and they have never slipped for me on hilly desert terrain with some steep aroyos. I don't have much grass to worry about, but I can drive a straight track without leaving more than an imprint in the grass.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Technorati | Furl | Stumble This

 05-26-2003, 06:31 Post: 55566
TomG

TP Contributor

Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Upper Ottawa Valley
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 5406

4
Filter by User
 pallet forks

I remember some old discussions where people said that going from bias to radial tires improves traction a lot. I took a hop into the Firestone Ag tire page because I didn't know if ags and radials went together--they do. Firestone also claims their 20-some degree bars give 15% more traction than traditional 45-degree bars. That may be just advertising but seems like there's a bunch that can be learned about tires.

There also are radial versions of R4' it seems and I had thought that all R4's were bias tires. I was going to ask AC how the R4's did on side hills since I heard that the rigid side-walls of R4's may not flex enough to allow full width tread contact when on side hills. Guess you'd have to ask if they are radial R4's first.

Another old saw is that loaded tires gain traction from the weight but loose some from tread distortion, which leads to the notion that there may be an optimal loading for tires on a particular tractor. I suppose that old saw too may be irrelevant with radial tires. I think tractor pull tractors use rotating weights on the axles for loading but I'm not sure whether liquid loading cuts traction or takes power. I believe they do cut the lugs on ag tires down to gain traction, or maybe it's to keep from breaking them off.

This learning stuff just goes on and on. At least I already know that if I went out today after yesterday's rain to turn over my compost pit, then I'd wish I had ags. Just throwing some stuff out here and maybe I'll learn some more from the replies.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Technorati | Furl | Stumble This

Reply | Pop Up Window Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo


Page [ 1 ] | 2 | | Next >>

Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Tractor Implements Forum

Thread 54924 Filter by Poster:
AC5ZO 2 | DRankin 1 | marklugo 1 | Murf 1 | Peters 1 | plots1 1 | TomG 4 | WillieH 1 |




Most Viewed

+ Tractor Category 1 2 3 Hitch sizes Defined
+ What is 3 point hitch draft control?
+ Howse impliments are junk.
+ Farmi vs. Fransgard Logging Winch
+ Spike tooth drag/harrow
+ Rock picker
+ Tractor Implements Category 1 vs Category 0
+ Kubota rear hydraulics for a log splitter
+ Road-Boss-Grader
+ Box Scraper size

Most Discussion

+ Newbie needs help - box blade
+ Hydraulic actuator (ram)
+ Anybody ever used a Stickler?
+ 3ph assembly for JD 4200 - Nic
+ Post hole diggers
+ Tire Fluid
+ Need a grapple rake for my FEL
+ Small farm tractor attachment
+ Box Scraper size
+ Log Skidding

Newest Topics

+ Leinbach L7200 Post hole digger oil seals
+ Pull type box blades
+ Hydraulic Top Link
+ Speeco 3pt. log splitter
+ Quick Hitch
+ Woods RM59 finish mower
+ Fiberglass thank fittings
+ Best Tractor Implement vs Worst Implement Investme
+ Proper Engine RPM When Using Lift
+ Rebuild PTO pump?













Turbochargers for Tractors and Industrial Machines
Cab Glass for Tractors and Industrial Machines

Alternators for Tractors and Industrial Machines
Radiators for Tractors and Industrial Machines

Driveline Components for Tractors and Industrial Machines
Starter Motors for Tractors and Industrial Machines