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 12-18-2007, 16:48 Post: 149406
kangaroo31

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I have a 40HP tractor with loader, disk and a 2 bottom plow.
The land is about 16 acre black dirt. I hired a local farmer did the brush hog and dig 2 800 feet ditches.(see the attach file.) The person promise me arrage spray and to deep plow after that but nothing did. Right now is to late to spray. The land need break (20 years no farm on it, lots oof weed roots, some of them are cattail). Try my 2 bottom plow couple times. Root Wastes are big headache. Plus the land is wet, tracking is a problem too. But looks I have to do someting this year by myself.
My questions are:
1. Can I buy a middle buster breake the surface 4-5" this year and buy a rake to clean all the roots. No experience, need your suggestions?
2. If I have to spray myself, need buy a sprayer. No Idea 55gl can last how long distance? Anyone use sprayer to apply liquid fertilizer as well?

Thanks for each word your input.






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 12-18-2007, 16:58 Post: 149407
greg_g



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Sounds like bottom ground to me. Around here it's pretty much left for dry season grazing and maybe one cut of hay. My guess is that yours is not going to be terribly productive unless/until it's properly drained. What is your end goal for this property?

//greg//






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 12-18-2007, 17:13 Post: 149408
kangaroo31

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It is not too low, actually higher than other fields. An old river is behind it. about 5-6 feet lower. If all the ditches work, drain is not a big issue. I plan to grow vegetables on it.






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 12-18-2007, 20:48 Post: 149410
candoarms



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Kangaroo31,

I see the trenches have water standing in them. Do these trenches run all the way to the river, and do they drain into the river? If so, why is there so much water standing in the trenches?

If your trenches do not extend all the way to the river, you'll need to finish that project. Drain off as much excess water as possible. During dry periods, those trenches can then be used as irrigation ditches.

Once the soil has dried quite a bit, you can then take a plow to it. Turn that sod over and allow it to dry out. That will kill most, if not all of the weeds and vegetation currently growing on it.

You'll need to use a plow with a coulter installed on it, in order to cut through the deep root mass. Without a coulter, the sod will run up over your plow and make it very difficult to work. The coulter acts much like a knife, in that it will cut the sod, allowing the plow to roll it over.

Your land looks very nice. You've done a fine job of things so far. You're coming along well, and it won't be long before that land starts making money for you.

Joel






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 12-19-2007, 09:13 Post: 149419
yooperpete



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 Small farm tractor attachment questions.

Something doesn't look nor sound right. Cattails only grow in really wet environments like swamps and bottoms of ditches. The standing water in your ditch/trench makes me think you have either no drop (trench deeper as it nears the main drainage ditch or river) or your property is marshland.

You have marshland or swampland if you go nearly anywhere and dig a hole with a shovel about 12"-18" deep and leave it for about an hour or less and it begins to fill with water. Generally the soil is a type of sand but black in color. Usually this type of soil is too wet to grow many crops and doesn't have the correct soil incredients for planting many crops.

For proper crop growth, farmers alway tile their property to help drain off excess moisture. Tile are now placed about 50' apart. They are made of plastic tubing with little slits that the water seeps into. The tile are dug gradually deeper at they either link together meeting a main tile or go directly in a ditch. The tile are usually about 5-6" in diameter. After a big rain or early in the spring, the water coming out of them is nearly fully of water. That is helpful for not only good plant growth but that you can get equipment in and till or harvest.

Your description of the root mass that plugs up your two bottom plow doesn't make sense. I'd like to see a close-up photo of that. A 2 bottom moldboard plow should be able to plow up most any kind of root that I've seen without a problem unless there is allot sticking out of the ground which wraps around the moldboard attachment shank.

For removing large tree roots we always used a homemade 2 shank subsoiler. I still have it. It has two shanks that are about 2 x 6 of solid steel that can go into the ground up to a foot or more to ripe out roots. It is real heavy and big. The frame is a 6x6 box made of 1/2" steel The shanks are about 3 feet apart.






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 12-19-2007, 11:10 Post: 149424
kangaroo31

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Joel, the black dirt is a kind of shallow. only 2-3 feet. Under that is clay. No one can drain clay, so the ditch is about 1 feet below the clay layer, about 3.5-4 feet deep. The water you see is very shallow stay on the bottom of the ditch. But close to the exit toward the river, ditch go through a 2-300 feet forest zone, that part is need dig deeper.
I will try the plow again when the snow melt and land freeze a little bit. Do you have the link of the coulter picture? the plow come with two disk like attachs, but I am not sure they can work like a knife, they are keep moving and not that sharp.

Thanks,






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 12-19-2007, 11:32 Post: 149426
kangaroo31

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yooperpete:
Thank you point out lots of important things. This land is wet, as I mention in other post, mainly because of 2 mountain/road run-off pipes cross the land to the back river. Because all the old ditches all gone and no one take care over 20 years, the water from run-off pipes flood the part of this land all the time after heavy raining, only those spots growing cattails. That is why I have to dig ditch to reconnect the water channel.
Your right, even though is not enough, black dirt alway wet. It is very tough, especially to a rockie like me, to grow lots of vegetables on it without the the drain system like you mentioned. But I tried lots of water-like vegetable on it this fall season. Some of them growing very well in this 85%-95% wet soil and cold weather. Like Chinese Celery, 4 types Chinese Green, 2 types Korean/Janpenese Radish, and some oriental spinach/water spinach, chrysanthemum etcs at begining.
I will try the plow again and take some pictures closer.






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 12-19-2007, 11:55 Post: 149429
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I'm not sure that plowing is your best bet to get a good seedbed no matter what your moisture problems are. Plowing does little to tear apart the rye zones. Each furrow tends to be one long, continuous row stuck together. Not to mention plowed virgin soil is very rough to work. The rye zones cling together, making it hard to use other machinery without draging clumps of dirt. The preferred implement around here would be a chisel plow, much like a heavy duty field cultivater, that would penetrate deep enough to rip up the rye zones. But a 40 hp tractor wouldn't pull a very big one, maybe six or seven feet. It sounds like you may need a tiller.






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 12-19-2007, 12:22 Post: 149430
kangaroo31

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Lwayne
Thanks for the suggestion. I considered chisel plow before. It is expensive and I may only use it once. But I think plow can do the same work. If I can plow only one direction, the furrows can exposed to the cold weather freeze and melt couple times, become very loose next spring. Then use my disk cut couple times, finally use a rank to clean all the waste and level it. Don't know it will work or not.
Do you think those root waste will not bother a tiller? I have a work-behind mini tiller, I have to clean it all the time. No experience on big PTO tiller.






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 12-19-2007, 13:35 Post: 149432
candoarms



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Kangaroo31,

A coulter is nothing more than a round disk, which mounts directly ahead of the plow blade. It turns as you go, splitting and slicing through the vegetation.

A chisel plow will work also, but they often plug up with vegetation. The weeds bend around the shanks (hair-pinning). Any implement you drag through the soil will tend to plug up with weeds, grass, vines, long roots, etc. This is why a disk is such a handy tool, especially after harvest.

The plow will work fine, but not until you get rid of some of that water. No farm implement works well in the mud. Work on that drainage problem just a bit more.

You've got more than enough good topsoil to work with. Once you get that land of yours dried out a bit, you'll find that things will go a whole lot easier for you.

Get it drained, plow it up, and then hit it with the disk. You'll see a huge improvement.

As a last resort you could attempt to use the tiller, but it's slow going, and the tiller isn't really meant to be used on any piece of land larger than an acre or two -- at most.

Joel





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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Tractor Implements Forum

Thread 149406 Filter by Poster:
Art White 1 | candoarms 7 | crunch 1 | greg_g 2 | kangaroo31 15 | kthompson 3 | Lwayne 6 | yooperpete 1 |




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