Relief valve weak: Tractor Engine Repair Rebuild  -- Tractor Maintenance Discussion Forum and Review Relief valve weak: Tractor Engine Repair Rebuild -- Tractor Maintenance Discussion Forum

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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Tractor Engine Repair Rebuild Forum

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 07-06-2002, 22:05 Post: 40102
mark Wormwood
2002-07-06 22:05:33
Post: 40102
 Relief valve weak

I have a power beyond on my TC33D for the back hoe.
I would think that before My hoe stalls that I should hear a strain on the engine or at least I should hear it working.
I just think I am being robbed of the potential power of my tractor. Can someone help me find the relief valve for the system and how do I make adjustments. Thanks






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 07-07-2002, 07:44 Post: 40110
TomG

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 Relief valve weak

If your 3ph has normal power than the hoe valve probably has a relief valve in it and that may be the problem. I hear substantial change in the engine throttle when Iím using my hoe, but the hoe will stall before the engine lugs. In my case, I consider that normal operation. Tractor hydraulics seldom take up a very large part of a tractorís power. If thatís were not the case, then raising the 3ph while plowing could bring a tractor to a rapid stop.

There was a similar discussion here about a loader awhile back. Relief valves are ordinarily adjusted using a pressure gauge. In case of the loader, relief valve pressure was a screw adjustment on the valve. A tech indicated that one turn equals so much pressure change.

In doing something like this, there is an assumption that the tractor's system relief valve is working normally and that the tractor's relief pressure is within a hoe's acceptable pressure range. The tractorís relief valve would provide protection even if the hoe relief valve were adjusted too high. It's not a good idea to crank adjustment screws blindly to see if something works better.

Tractor relief valves are often part of a hydraulic manifold block that also contains a diverter valve. There there really is no alternative to using a gauge when adjusting the pressure. A typical adjustment involves placing shims under a spring in the relief valve.






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 07-07-2002, 09:00 Post: 40115
Mark Wormwood
2002-07-07 00:00:00
Post: 40115
 Relief valve weak

Thanks for the responce.
I have had to make adjustments to the loader valve when I first got this tractor, The way it was set up the bucket couldn't lift the tractor off the ground. I found the adjustment screw and gave it one turn at a time until it could do some work. Now when I have a load the engine will load up.
My backhoe will not load up the engine, in fact it is way to weak to do much of anything. I know that the problem is in the tractor relive valve and not the hoe because with the Hoe disconected the PBO valve when opened doesn't lug the engine, even at low idle there is no lug at all.
I have messed with relive valves on old tractors in the past, but I don't know wear to look on this TC33D






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 07-08-2002, 06:37 Post: 40136
TomG

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 Relief valve weak

Wish I could help, but I really only know my Ford 1710 specifically. If I were guessing, I'd say that following the inlet hose from the loader valve should lead to a block. Mine is on the lower right side of the engine. The block contains the relief and diverer valves.

I wouldn't tackle a relief valve adjustment without a repair manual and preferably a parts manual as well. Parts manuals give better exploded parts diagrams. Maybe some relief valves are screw adjustable but many are adjusted by shims. A person awhile back gave himself a bad time by checking the valve for a broken spring and then not getting the parts back together correctly. He was working without a manual.

Following a manual procedure and using a pressure gauge also is a good idea to be certain that the valve is set to the factory speced system pressure. The system relief valve may be the only protection against excessive system operating pressures. Relief valves in 3ph's and on many spooling valve assemblies provide protection against load shocks. My 3ph relief valve is set about 1000 lbs. higher than the system relief valve pressure.

A gauge is about a $10 item from Northern Tool and other places. Welding bottle gauges also work. Setting up a gauge with a hose terminating in a quick connect and taking a reading from a loader cylinder hose outlet works, but isn't accurate if the loader valve leaks through. Pressure readings are usually taken from the manifold block auxiliary system outlet port so only the relief valve and priority valve (if equipped) is between the pump and gauge.

A fitting for the gauge may be needed to hook into the port. I think the fitting needed for my Ford is 3/8" NPT even though it's basically a Japanese tractor. The use of NPT threads for hydraulic systems ports is fairly common internationally, and most any hydraulics shop would have a fitting.






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Tractor Engine Repair Rebuild Forum

Thread 40102 Filter by Poster:
mark Wormwood 2 | TomG 2 |




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