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 02-12-2001, 10:55 Post: 24141
Frank R Taylor



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 Fixing Flats

I recently had a flat on my Kubota B2400. Luckily it was on the front so it wasn't a problem to get the wheel off but I got to looking and if it had been a rear tire that had gone flat, I couldn't see a convenient jacking point or any way to raise the rear because of the guards etc. Perhaps Bird or one of you other small Kubota users could answer my question, "What is the easiest way to raise the back end so you can get a wheel off in order to fix a flat?"






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 02-12-2001, 11:12 Post: 24143
Bird Senter

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 Fixing Flats

Frank, fortunately I've never had a flat on the rear of my Kubotas, although I have fixed some on the rear of much bigger tractors. And of course, I jacked up the rear of my B2710 to take the weight off the wheels when I put the water and anti-freeze in the rear tires. They really don't seem to think about having a good place for a jack when they design these things. I have both a bottle jack and a floor jack and jack stands, so I wouldn't have a real problem getting a jack under the rear axle housing and picking up the tractor, but of course, it can get quite dangerous if you're not careful. If you lift the back end, be sure the front wheels are solidly chocked, and with a big enough jack, you can put it under the center of the rear axle if you keep in mind that if the weight is not exactly centered the tractor is going to tilt to one side or the other when you lift. I'm sorry, but I probably couldn't help you much without being able to see the tractor and the jack you intend to use. Maybe someone else can help more.






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 02-13-2001, 08:10 Post: 24177
KenB



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 Fixing Flats

Unless the 2400 is very different, you should be able to lift the rear the way I do on my 1750: using the scissors jack from my pickup under the rear axle. You could also use a floor jack or a bottle jack on a block of wood. Good advice about chocking the wheels has already been given. My safety tip is that you should always use solid wood for chocking and blocking up, since it will not crack or crumble unexpectedly like brick or concrete block can.






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 02-13-2001, 10:26 Post: 24182
Murf

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The comment about blocking the wheels is excellent advice. If you want to make life even easier (and safer) engage the parking brake VERY firmly, and engage the 4wd (if so equipped) and engage the diff. lock BEFORE jacking the tractor up, this will do two things. First the whell will not spin when trying to loosen the lug nuts, even if you have 'broken' them loose before jacking, friction between stud & nut will cause the wheel to spin. Secondly, it will help keep the tractor steady since the wheels on the ground will resisit rolling, even if your wheel chocks should move. Best of luck.






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 02-13-2001, 12:00 Post: 24186
Frank R Taylor



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 Fixing Flats

Thanks guys. I just wondered if I was missing something. I have 3 jacks at the house but there was no place to use the Hi-Lift and the 2 bottle jacks were just a fraction too short. I didn't try my 4x4 truck jack. That should be high enough to handle it. It was just that in my younger (and stupider) days I had a vehicle come off the jack and one jack slowly disappear into the soft ground even though it was on a piece of wood so I like to be careful when when changing wheels these days. Engaging the 4-wheel drive is a good idea Murf, I never thought of that one. Anyway, thanks for the advice. When it happens I'll be ready.






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 02-13-2001, 12:08 Post: 24187
Murf

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 Fixing Flats

I forgot to mention the other easy way to change tires without even using a jack at all, as long as you have a compressor nearby. Inflate the offending tire to normal pressure then place blocks under the axle just behind leaky tire, fully deflate tire and remove, after flat is fixed, deflate (if already inlflated, say by tire shop) replace tire and re-inflate and renmove blocking. This method while slow is very safe, especially if large blocks are used since tractor sits on a large stable surface usually. Best of luck.






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 02-13-2001, 13:57 Post: 24190
Todd



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 Fixing Flats

You may not need a compressor. You can buy a portable 5 or 10 gallon canister at most auto or hardware stores, or sears and carry it to the tractor. I'm probably going to get one via Harbor Freight next time they list one. I'm also considering "Slime". The 5gallon container lists for a few hundred dollars, but a local store will sell it to me for 150. Given the hassle everyone is telling me about flats and loading, wheel weights and slime are looking like a better and better deal!! Slime is thickened food grade polyethyline glycol and rubber shavings from what I understand. Won't freeze up on me, not toxic, and lasts a few years.
Any thoughts on it??






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 02-13-2001, 15:23 Post: 24194
Murf

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 Fixing Flats

Todd, like most things that sound too easy...... it is. From experience I can tell you that a 10 gallon air tank would barely put a dent in a flat tire of the size normally encountered on the business side of a tractor. While I have never done an exact calc. I can tell you that the 60 gal. tank (pressurized to 120 psi)on my compressor will not completely fill a 355/80R20 turf tire on my machines, the compressor must be started to finish the job. Again, too good to be true, but excellent for very small punctures, Slime works ok, but, God forbid, you ever get something serious enough to require a 'boot' type repair, all of the Slime must be removed and the inside of the casing cleaned thoroughly, definitely NOT a $10 repair. Best of luck.






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 02-13-2001, 19:59 Post: 24213
Todd



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How big a tire is that Murf, or how big a tractor? Also, I thought we were only trying to pump it up enough to put blocks under the rear axle. You don't think 10gallons at 120psi would do that. If it won't, I won't waste my money on a tank, but my B2710, and a B2400 don't have very big rear tires.
Todd.






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 02-13-2001, 20:41 Post: 24216
Bird Senter

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Todd, I have one of the little 7 gallon tanks and at 100 psi, it was plenty to air up a FRONT tire on my B2710 in the field one day so I could drive it back in, but I doubt that that one tank full would air up a rear tire, even on a B2710.






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Tractor Engine Repair Rebuild Forum

Thread 24141 Filter by Poster:
Bird Senter 3 | Frank R Taylor 2 | KenB 1 | Murf 5 | Todd 3 | TomG 2 |




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