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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Snowblowers / Snow Plows / Removal Forum

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 02-15-2000, 00:00 Post: 12821
DanaT



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 Snow Blowers

Does any one have comments about self propelled snow blowers? I need to know if the different price ranges of blowers. Will they work the same, a wet snow compared to a dry snow. I know nothing about this subject and could use alot of insite!Thanks for any comments






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 02-15-2000, 00:00 Post: 12822
Murf

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 Snow-Blowers

Dana, as a landscaper (and therefore a snow removal contractor in winter) we have used many of them over the years for clearing clients sidewalks, etc. They work very well, but only in direct proportion to the operators skill level. as for the two different types, the auger type is far superior in powder (dry) snow, especially if it is deep, it will through this type of snow MUCH farther and more accurately. The 'paddle' type (such as Toro) which is just basically a large, powered drum with several paddles that resemble big squeegies, are best suited to wet, heavy snow and will clean slush right to dry pavement VERY fast, this is important if there is a threat of freezing, since it easier to clear slush than ice. In practice we use both depending on conditions, etc., however for the average homeowner this is not practical (just Roger & I do these things, right Roger? Laughing out loud). If I had to pick only one I would lean towards an auger type with tires not tracks. This is just personal preference, but I think that one is the best comprimise... Best of luck.






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 02-15-2000, 00:00 Post: 12828
MichaelSnyder

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 Snow-Blowers

Dana,
I also agree with Murf's post, minus one difference in personnel preference. Having owned both wheel and track versions...I still prefer the track. Naturally, each has advantages & disadvantages. Tracks seem to require a bit more muscle to change direction or push (free wheel) into your garage, but like their big brothers...Tracks offer improved traction over a tire.. I found tires by themselves are hardly impressive, chains naturally improve this significantly. BUT, now you are faced with possible suface damage from the chains themselves. Especially under slippage conditions. For me, this was an issue. But if you are on pavement, it is doubtful you will consider chain damage an issue. Secondly, I cannot attest to this because I have always had pavement, but I also understand that track models and stone driveways are not the best of friends. The drive wheels for the tracks are plastic and are eventually destroyed by stones lodged in between the track and plastic wheels.
SO...I don't know what to tell you. I think Yamaha offers a 4wd wheel version.
Guess this is supposed to offer the best of both worlds. Good Luck.






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 02-16-2000, 00:00 Post: 12849
TomG

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 Snow-Blowers

The chutes tend to clog with wet snow. With dry snow and even a little wind, just hope you can blow snow in any direction. If you can't, you end up really REALLY covered in snow.

Safety procedures require the engine to be shut off when clearing the chute. The transmissions on many blowers are really just rubber wheels that slide back and forth across a flywheel. Neutral is at the centre of the flywheel. It's easy for the wheel to slip off centre and send a bit of power to the drive train when in neutral. My old 24" 7hp auger blower has an additional belt clutch between the engine and drive train, so I don't mind sticking a broom handle down the chute with the engine running, but best advice is: 'Turn off the engine.' Remember, all power equipment is dangerous.

The chute will clog less if the fan can be run while the blower is stopped. That way, the auger is cleared before the blower moves forward again. Don't know if hand blowers can do this. My tractor with a live PTO can. With the hand blower, I just tip it up and hold it back until it stops blowing.

I use the old hand blower for 'trimming' where the tractor doesn't get. It doesn't have to do a lot of work, and I'm guessing that about a foot of fairly wet snow would challange the 7hp engine. If I depended on the hand blower and was expecting a heavy snow, I'd probably wouldn't let a big build up happen--even if I had to get up in the middle of the night. If I depended on the hand blower, I'd have one with more HP.

Last comment. Remember to turn off the fuel valve when not in use. If the carburator float valve fails, the engine crank case fills up with gas. Same thing for all gas engines with gravity fed fuel systems.






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 02-16-2000, 00:00 Post: 12881
Vince



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 Snow-Blowers

Dana, Maybe you are already aware of this but one thing that was not mentioned is "single stage" as opposed to "two stage". the single stage does not have a fan in the center behind the auger. sorta like the toro mentioned above, but it would have an auger instead of the paddles. This type releys on a fast spinning auger which throws the snow out the shut. It may not work that well with wet heavy snow. the two stage has a slower moving auger which moves the snow to the fan, which blows the snow. It works alot better with the snow you would not like to shovel, the wet heavy crap. Good Luck, Vince






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 02-17-2000, 00:00 Post: 12892
TomG

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 Snow-Blowers

Vince: Thanks for the clarification. Shows you how much I know. I thought all auger blowers had fans. Therefore, a two stage blower must be something I didn't have. Figured it might be some sort of additional fan that cleared snow out of the top of the chute or something. Guess nobody around here has anything but two stage blowers.

After yesterday, I'll add an operating tip. The 7hp blower was challenged making a path between the tractor tent and garage. You can ease the engine load by tipping the blower back so it takes a smaller cut. However, tipping is limited by the distance of the axles to the ground. Much tipping and you just end up trying to push snow with the blower's under carriage. If I was getting a blower, I think I'd get one with big wheels which should give more ground clearance.






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Snowblowers / Snow Plows / Removal Forum

Thread 12821 Filter by Poster:
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