Ploughing advice: Tillers and Ploughs  -- Tractor Attachments Implements 3ph Discussion Forum and Review Ploughing advice: Tillers and Ploughs -- Tractor Attachments Implements 3ph Discussion Forum

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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Tillers and Ploughs Forum

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 09-08-2007, 21:56 Post: 145523
alexeir



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 Ploughing advice

Howdy,

Just got a Kubota b7610 which we want to use to plough a field to plant food crops. Also got a taylor-way roto tiller. The field has never been planted so there is a lot of sod. Should I be using some kind of plough before rototilling to prepare the soil. If so, what would be the best variety of plough for the job?






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 09-08-2007, 22:13 Post: 145524
earthwrks

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 Ploughing advice

Why would you want to plow AND rototill? Seems like you'd do one or the other. I would only rototill, but you will likely have to wait a few days then do it again as the sod may want to take root again. Do yourelf a favor and mow the sod as short as you can before you till or plow to turn it into mulch to get a head start on decomposition.

Growing up on a small farm, we never plowed--only disked it then used a homemade drag made of 4' angle iron in the shape of a square to smooth it.






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 09-08-2007, 22:13 Post: 145525
hardwood

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 Ploughing advice

Alexeir; Knowing where you are located would make it somewhat easier to give advice. Is the soil being prepared to plant a crop now, or is it being fall worked to plant spring crops? If you are fall working it for spring crops your best bet would be a mouldboard plow seven or eight inches deep to turn under the topgrowth and allow it to rot over winter, then your roto tiller will work fine the spring. Roto tillers and live roots/heavy topgrowth just don't work at all, you will be plugged up almost immeadiately. If you are wanting to seed this fall your best method would be to spray the top growth with Roundup, then give it a good two weeks to completely kill the root systems then if possible burn it off. A roto tiller will handle some dead roots, but not to many, so liely a disk or even the moldboard plow may be your best bet ahead of the roto tiller. Frank.






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 09-08-2007, 22:42 Post: 145526
alexeir



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Thanks for your responses.

Being new to this, I initially thought all I would need is a rototiller, but am having second thoughts after doing some reading and am now wondering if the moldboard type plow is a better option for getting down deep and turning over soil. But from earthwrks response, it sounds like the tiller can get the job done just as well? What's the difference between ploughing and "disking" it?

I'm in Vermont and we've got a lot of clay in the soil. We are going to put in a cover crop now until we plant garlic later this fall. Also want to prepare fields for other crops in the spring.






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 09-09-2007, 06:05 Post: 145530
hardwood

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Alexier; EW is correct a tiller will work fine "IF" there isn't too much trash or roots to plug it up. A mouldboard plow turns the trash and roots under to leave a fairly trash free surface. A roto tiller trys to mix whatever is on the surface with the tilled soil and leave the trash and roots on or near the surface. No disk will match a mouldboard plow when it comes to turning under trash. The plow will do the job in one pass and a disk will take lots of passes and never really eliminate the trash. A disk has a bad reputation for creating soil compaction, so another reason to not overdo it with a disk, one pass only, or two at the most in any situation. What type of seedbed is needed for planting garlic? If you need a clean trash free surface I'd suggest a moldboard plow followed by a disk to level it out. Please don't do either operation when the soil is too wet or all you will have is clods. If you haven't bought the tiller yet, maybe wait till you see if you really need one. Nothing tops a tiller far as making a superfine seedbed, but they are pittifly slow compared to a mouldboard plow, plus rocks and roots give them a hard time. Best of luck with the soil preparation, and maybe fill us in on garlic production, do you plant bulbs in the fall for spring harvest? Frank.






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 09-09-2007, 07:29 Post: 145533
candoarms



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 Ploughing advice

Alexeir,

I've read the replies under this topic, and I generally agree with the others who've responded to you.

Tillers are generally used for garden work, where a very small amount of land is being worked up. They aren't suitable for covering anything over an acre, due to the slow pace involved.

I believe you'll need a plow, disk, and cultivator. These implements will cover a tremendous amount of land in a much shorter amount of time.

You'll need to get rid of the surface vegetation as much as possible, before doing anything else. Mowing -- or spraying with herbicides, such as Roundup -- will do the job well. (If you have a lot of rocks on the land, use herbicides first. You'll then be able to see and pick any rocks that may damage a mower.)

After you've removed the surface vegetation, you can then hit the land with a plow. This will turn the soil over and create a deep root path for your garlic plants. It will also expose any rocks that you missed earlier.

Once you've plowed up the land, you should then disk it. This will create a fairly level piece of nicely tilled soil for your crop.

For final seed bed preparation, I highly recommend a cultivator just prior to planting, as this will loosen the soil and destroy any weeds that haven't yet emerged.

You will also be able to modify your cultivator, by adjusting the distance between the sweeps, so that you can control the weeds that emerge after planting. Of course, you'll have to plant your garlic in rows, spaced properly to allow your tractor to drive between them.

I don't know anything about planting garlic. Maybe you need to create a hill, or mound, for garlic beds.......I have no idea here. If so, a middle buster will help you create the mounds......and it does a great job of this. Just don't set it too deep, because you'll want nice, fine soil for your seed beds. If set too deep, you'll create a whole lot of heavy clumps.

And lastly, you'll want to do all of this work when the soil is moist, but not wet. Working wet soil will create a tremendous number of large and heavy dirt clods later, which are nearly impossible to plant in without first roto-tilling the entire piece of land.

A cultivator is a very useful tool after the soil has been broken up. This is one implement EVERY farmer has, and uses the most often.......but, it doesn't work well when there's heavy vegetation on the surface, as it will plug up with weeds after just a few feet.

Good luck with the garlic crop, and enjoy that new Kubota.

Joel






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 09-11-2007, 21:37 Post: 145632
Art White



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I like a chisel type plow and a tiller. It allows for better root growth from the looser soil.






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 09-12-2007, 08:10 Post: 145638
kthompson



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Alexeir, not being the bad guy here but are you asking for use with the B7610? If so don't think you will find some of those choices given to be an option. It just does not have the power, sorry. I would suggest you see if you can hire a local farmer to plow or disk the ground for you to such condition you can use your tiller. Even if you had the power this might be the best option to buying a piece of equipment. You may find a sprayer to be a needed piece of equipement. Then you still have to watch the size due to tractor size. Am sure a 50 or 55 gallon sprayer is your limit on the 3 pt hitch. Larger if trailer type.

Hardwood, why does a disk give you more compaction than any other type of implement? Is it due to running at same or nearly same depth? Is it due to not running it as deep as moldboard plows normally are? Is it due to the weight of the tractor just running over and over the field? I believe my sprayer loaded gives me the most compaction due to all the weight. On my soil I have found subsoiling every 2 to 4 years handles my soil compaction problem. kt






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 09-12-2007, 08:47 Post: 145640
Art White



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A disk is the heaviest compactor known in tillage!!! Think about how much weight is on the edge of every cutting edge! It maybe is at the most 1/4 of an inch wide but yet often carrying 100lbs on it.

For the needs of the garlic the tiller would be fine. With the clay type soil a couple of shanks designed to penetrate up to 8" on a frame would more then likely take care of loosening the clay enough to allow better drainage.

Years ago working in some of that fine blue clay with a chisel plow that the fellow was having trouble pulling about dusk we noticed a glow from the shanks! Never seen it since but we know it was tough pulling and everything was working hard. Unless you start opening it up it will stay just as tight and hard as it is.






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 09-12-2007, 09:23 Post: 145641
candoarms



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 Ploughing advice

KThompson,

A disk is a soil compactor. On top of the fact that it's a very heavy implement, It doesn't cut very deep, which makes the tractor's tire tracks very hard. Its purpose is to handle any weeds and vines that would easily plug up any other implement, since it rolls over and cuts the vegetation, rather than dragging through.

A disk should only be used when heavy weeds and vines prevent the use of any other implement.

It does a great job on corn stalks, sunflower stalks --- and for breaking up beans, cucumber plants, watermelon, squash, and other vine-type plants.

The disk is not intended to be used in seed bed preparation. It simply doesn't cut deep enough, and it causes soil compaction.

Other implements are designed for seed bed prep work. The roto-tiller might be the best, but it is designed only for smaller acreages. Larger acreages are best handled with a cultivator and harrow.

The B7610 will easily pull a 6 foot cultivator with a harrow behind. The harrow will break up any dirt clumps left by the cultivator. For any piece of ground larger than an acre or two, the cultivator is preferred over the tiller......simply because it covers much more ground in far less time.

Joel






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Tillers and Ploughs Forum

Thread 145523 Filter by Poster:
alexeir 3 | Art White 2 | BoonvilleKid 1 | brokenarrow 1 | candoarms 4 | earthwrks 1 | hardwood 2 | kthompson 4 | Murf 1 | TumbaDowns 1 |




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