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 11-19-2006, 14:33 Post: 137112
ronald65



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I plan to use a Product Called Ondura It is a Corrugated roofing material that comes in 48 in.X 79 in. sheets about 18 lbs per sheet. Have any of you used this product? It is sold by Menards in the midwest. Ron






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 11-19-2006, 15:22 Post: 137117
Peters

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 Roofing

I have seen it at Lowes but not sure if I would use it. What are the advantages over a metal roofing material? I have some pretty long runs on my House roof and no horizontal seams. On the garage I had to seam it and have more than a foot over lap. Despite this the way the wind blows here in a storm we get the odd leak.






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 11-19-2006, 16:49 Post: 137124
earthwrks

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I've seen it used here on the Gulf coast on homes that survived hurricane Katrina just off the beach. It's sold at Lowes here too. But I have to wonder: even though it has been used for many years how will long will it be when it falls out of favor and is suplanted by the galvalume steel panels? Where do you find replacment panels? It's fairly thick and appears to have a rough, mesh-like finish which should take paint. That may not be a good thing if mold and algae are a problem as the spores will have little ponds to hang out in. From a sound-proofing standpoint it appears to be an asphalt-based product; it would lend itself to a quiter roof underneath. If I used it I'd buy enough to keep on hand as replacements for storm damage or if you wanted to add on a shop or other lean-to. The other thing is sealing the ends at the walls against insects, birds and the elements --I didn't see any weatherstip blocking, but I didn't look either.






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 11-19-2006, 19:17 Post: 137130
ronald65



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I've seen it and it looks good to me, it's priced between asphalt shingles and steel roofing.shoul go on faster than shingles and I don't like the way steel roof condenses water in the winter. We don't get much rain here,but it is sure noisy in my friends polebarn when it's raining.www.ondura.com they will send a nice packare of instructions and coror broschure.I just wondered if anybody has used it and how they liked it. I won't be ordering till spring now. I am still sawing Roof boards.Ron






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 11-19-2006, 19:36 Post: 137131
earthwrks

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The homes I've seen it and the steel roof either have a typical sheathed roof using OSB or 1/2" plywood. The others have a typical truss with purlins spaced every 24". I'd much rather use the plywood or OSB depending on cost for added stuctrual rigidity and keep out wind/rain/bugs/birds. I might be tempted to put down one row of tar paper along the eaves to help preserve the wood in case rain does get whipped up there.






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 11-20-2006, 05:53 Post: 137147
hardwood

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Last summer we needed to re roof a rental house, so after seeing quite a few homes even some new homes with steel roofing I did some research. The major positive was long life, some was warranted for 50 yrs., some was in sheets like barn steel, some was in rectangle shapes that somehow locked together with no exposed fasteners. Biggest negative over conventional shingles was cost, about double for some. Then I remembered going into steel roofed sheds on a frosty morning when the sun was melting the frost off the inside of the roof and it is almost raining in the building. Would'nt the frost collect on the underside of the steel no matter how it is put on or what is under the steel? Where does this moisture go? Is there a way to get some airflow under the steel to take the moisture out? Anyway I did'nt use the steel, but still wonder about these questions. Frank.






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 11-20-2006, 07:11 Post: 137148
earthwrks

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Frank, that's the same question I asked a contractor. The response was there shouldn't be moisture between the steel and wood. The moisture, if any like any other ordinary roof would be on the bottom side of the sheathing. But then I saw another contractor using 1x3 battens or nailer strips to space it off the sheathing for ventilation. err? So I asked him about the wind getting under it and ripping it off. He didn't feel it was a big deal. We'll see. He may be right because at a certian point the house may either blow or wash away in hurricane winds so having an intact roof is moot. And I agree with you about raining inside. A friend who used to build commercial buildings built his 10,000 sft shop without roof insulation and it rains inside. Asked him why he did that if he knew that was going to happen and he says, "Well... I'm cheap" 'nuf said.






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 11-20-2006, 16:25 Post: 137175
kthompson



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 Roofing

I built a shop with steel roofing about 5 years ago. Currently the roof is open but the shop walls are solid with little air movement below the roof and with concrete floor. If there is any condensation in my shop it is very seldom and very little. Now, the sheds on the side with dirt floors and wide open, grab rain coat at times.

As to steel holding in high winds, old galv. roofing nailed on here has held up to many a hurricane over the years. If you have every thing underneath nailed properly it is seldom you see a loose sheet.

Ron, I think you are correct on what you have said about Ondura. My understanding it is a multi layered paper product. They did have vented and non vented product to seal the ends.






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Barns Pole Barns Forum

Thread 137112 Filter by Poster:
earthwrks 3 | hardwood 1 | kthompson 1 | Peters 1 | ronald65 2 |




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