Pole Building 
: Other Tractor Brands  -- Other Tractor Brands Discussion Forum and Review Pole Building : Other Tractor Brands -- Other Tractor Brands Discussion Forum

  parts   |   manuals   |   discussion   |   photos   |   podcast   |   reviews   |   specs   |   dealers   |   classifieds   |   contact   |   faq   |   myProfile   |   home          Login Now | Sign Up


FAQ:   What is a tractor?

Forum Index
New As Posted | Active Subjects



www.emerichsales.com - New & Used Equipment
          View Tractors For Sale!


www.partsbynet.com - Lawn and Garden Equipment Parts


Bernardsville Landscape Lighting
Click to Post a New Message!

Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Other Tractor Brands Forum

Page [ 1 ] |
Reply | Pop Up Window Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo
 04-19-1999, 00:00 Post: 3057
Gary



Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: vermont
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 43
 Pole Building

Putting up a new pole building and I'm concerned about frost and red clay with the poles being pushed out of the ground from the cold winters in Northern Minnesota. Has anyone delt with this problem and or have any solutions for it. They told me they put the poles 4 1/2 feet in the ground is all. Thanks, Gary






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

 04-19-1999, 00:00 Post: 3061




Join Date:
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1

7
Filter by User
 Pole Building

Here in New York they recomend putting the posts 4 feet in the ground and I havenever heard of anyone ever having a heaving problem with any of their buildingsconsidering your location is slightly different then here, upstate I should add,is more than likely the reason for the additional 1/2 of a foot.............frommy understanding it is very seldom that frost goes below the three foot mark andfrost has to get under the posts, and under far enough to heave all of the weightI would ask around of local contractors and if that is the going depth than Iwould think that you'd be OKRich






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

 04-19-1999, 00:00 Post: 3065
Paul



Join Date:
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1
 Pole Building

Find out what the average frost depth is and add a 1 or so to it. The main thing is to be below the frost depth, anything close to it can move, keep in mind heavily travel area or areas without snow will get deeper frost than is normally found. If every one in your area is going 4.5 feet than I would think that that should be considered a minimum depth.Good Luck






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

 04-19-1999, 00:00 Post: 3073




Join Date:
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1

7
Filter by User
 Pole Building

Iv'e also heard that some people don't fill the whole hole with cement. Just a few bags in the bottom of the hole. That way the earth on top slides on the post but cement acts like an anchor under the heaving earth.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

 04-19-1999, 00:00 Post: 3075




Join Date:
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1

7
Filter by User
 Pole Building

Talk to your local building department. They will have a code for minimum depthof a foundation which falls below the frost line. They will tell you what it is foryour area. SE Michigan is 42"!






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

 04-19-1999, 00:00 Post: 3082




Join Date:
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1

7
Filter by User
 Pole Building

Get below the frost line by a foot or so. Fill the bottom with concretestaying below the frost line. For additional belt and suspenders you can put a LIGHTweight split PVC sleeve around the pole. This sleeve rests on top of the concrete and either slides itself or allows the dirt a lower friction surfaceto slide against when the earth heaves. The PVC must be light enough weight tobe firmly compressed against the pole by earth pressure. Additionally you MUSTkeep moisture away from the poles. Use long overhangs and french drains. Roger L






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

 04-20-1999, 00:00 Post: 3117




Join Date:
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1

7
Filter by User
 Pole Building

I have heard that frost will grab the poles on the sides and pinch them so tight that it will raise them that way just like popping pimple. I guess the pvc around the pole or maybe even plastic will work so the clay will not be able to grab on to them. Thanks






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

 04-20-1999, 00:00 Post: 3130




Join Date:
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1

7
Filter by User
 Pole Building

Roger,I've never done pole stuctures before, but am curious. When you mentioned putting concrete in the bottom of the hole, was this after the pole was placed? The reason I'm asking is that while concrete makes for excellent foundation and footer material, it has a nasty habit of absorbing moisture and holding against the wood. I've seen shallow set posts rot out in the concrete, but be OK above the concrete (wood dries out). 'Just curious as to what the practice is.Also, many types of clays expand when wet and they typically have poor load bearing capacity. A concrete footing that has a larger surface area than the poles might be called for. Otherwise the pole could sink further into the ground when the clay is wet. I don't believe the pole has to be secured, but some form of attachment might be a good idea to prevent the clay from expanding (either due to frost or water) and pushing the pole up. If the pole is attached, the footer would act as an anchor, as well as a load distributor. Another consideration is to backfill around the pole with gravel (no fines!). This will provide for drainage around the pole, allowing it to dry out and have enough "give" to prevent the expanded clay to get a grip on the pole.Lee






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

 04-21-1999, 00:00 Post: 3188




Join Date:
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1

7
Filter by User
 Pole Building

I had a pole building constructed here in Wisconsin about 10 years ago. I too have clay. They drilled the holes down below the frost depth and then placed concrete pads in the bottom of the holes. The pads they used were pre-cast concrete pads and they just placed them in the bottom of the hole before setting the poles. No problems so far.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

 04-22-1999, 00:00 Post: 3197
Ed C in Vt



Join Date:
Location:
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1
 Pole Building

Here in Vt we also get a little frost from time to time. My father-in-law taught me a trick years ago about putting poles in the ground that I've used many time with success. His trick was to put a pipe around the post, with the bottom of the pipe at the same level as the bottom of the post (below frostlevel), and the top of the pipe a few inches above ground level. The frost will grab a hold of and move the pipe up and down, but the post never moves.A simple time proven solution...






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

Reply | Pop Up Window Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo


Page [ 1 ] |

Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Other Tractor Brands Forum

Thread 3057 Filter by Poster:
7 | Ed C in Vt 1 | Gary 1 | Paul 1 |




Most Viewed

+ Task Master Tractors.Are they any good??
+ Branson Tractor Review
+ Mahindra are they good review
+ Branson vs. Century
+ What about Mccormick tractors?
+ Leaf vacuum for catagory I three point
+ New to me Bolens Tractor
+ Mahindra - Starting problems
+ TYM and Terramite Tractors
+ FarmTrac 300DTC

Most Discussion

+ Task Master Tractors.Are they
+ TIME TO START MAHINDRA DISCUSS
+ Need help from all you PROs
+ Branson vs. Century
+ TYM and Terramite Tractors
+ Honda Compact tractor
+ blue book for tractors
+ Mahindra, Kioti, Brason and Cu
+ seatbelt survey
+ Branson Vs Century

Newest Topics

+ 1983 Allis Chalmers 6140 4WD
+ taishan tractor help help
+ parts dougfeng task master trooper 426E 4X4
+ parts dougfeng task master trooper 426E 4X4
+ foton 404 3cyl
+ rhino tractor
+ Foton ft404 black diesel splat out of exhaust
+ taishan 304 diesel timing
+ Branson 4220 racing problem
+ taishan ts304a injection pump info













Turbochargers for Tractors and Industrial Machines
Cab Glass for Tractors and Industrial Machines

Alternators for Tractors and Industrial Machines
Radiators for Tractors and Industrial Machines

Driveline Components for Tractors and Industrial Machines
Starter Motors for Tractors and Industrial Machines