AG vs Industrial Tires: New Holland Tractor Review  -- New Holland Tractors Discussion Forum and Review AG vs Industrial Tires: New Holland Tractor Review -- New Holland Tractors Discussion Forum

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 12-27-2010, 20:17 Post: 175987
spsteve



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 AG vs Industrial Tires

When I bought my new tractor I was given the 'choice' of either 'AG' or 'Industrial' tires.

What is the general concensus and what applications are each best suited for? (for next time)

Thanks..






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 12-27-2010, 21:29 Post: 175989
candoarms

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 AG vs Industrial Tires

Spsteve,

Ag tires (R1) are generally used for heavy pulling in soft soil.....as when cultivating, plowing, handling manure, feed lot work, etc. They have very deep lugs and therefore don't provide a good ride on hard surfaces. Ag tires are designed to apply a great amount of pressure per square inch on the ground. They leave very deep impressions in soft soil. Ag tires will quickly wear on hard surfaces, due to the very small area making contact with the ground. They will also tear up a lawn in quick fashion. Ag tires are horrible on ice, but very good in deep snow and there's nothing better in mud.

Industrial tires are designed to provide long wear on hard surfaces. Due to the increased width of the bars, harder rubber, and a wider footprint -- industrial tires will greatly outlast ag tires when used on concrete, pavement, and gravel. Industrial tires don't provide for much traction in loose soil, and they aren't great on ice and snow. It's a good compromise for those of us who use our tractors in all conditions.

Turf tires are generally much wider than the others. They are designed for use on golf courses, finished lawns, football fields, city parks, etc. They provide little to no traction in loose soil. They're very bad in mud. However, they shine when it comes to reducing soil compaction on finished lawns. During the winter months, you won't find a better tire for use on ice.

Hope that helps.

Joel






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 12-29-2010, 12:09 Post: 176008
spsteve



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 AG vs Industrial Tires

Quote:
Originally Posted by candoarms | view 175989
Spsteve,Ag tires (R1) are generally used for heavy pulling in soft soil.....as when cultivating, plowing, handling manure, feed lot work, etc.They have very deep lugs and therefore don't provide a good ride on hard surfaces. Ag tires are designed to apply a great amount of pressure per square inch on the ground.They leave very deep impressions in soft soil. Ag tires will quickly wear on hard surfaces, due to the very small area making contact with the ground.They will also tear up a lawn in quick fashion.Ag tires are horrible on ice, but very good in deep snow and there's nothing better in mud.Industrial tires are designed to provide long wear on hard surfaces.Due to the increased width of the bars, harder rubber, and a wider footprint -- industrial tires will greatly outlast ag tires when used on concrete, pavement, and gravel. Industrial tires don't provide for much traction in loose soil, and they aren't great on ice and snow.It's a good compromise for those of us who use our tractors in all conditions.Turf tires are generally much wider than the others.They are designed for use on golf courses, finished lawns, football fields, city parks, etc.They provide little to no traction in loose soil.They're very bad in mud. However, they shine when it comes to reducing soil compaction on finished lawns.During the winter months, you won't find a better tire for use on ice.Hope that helps.Joel



Thanks for the explanation. I was basically 'steered' towards the Industrial tires (I think that's how they came from CNH).

Sounds like I probably should have held out for the AG tires but time will tell.






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 12-29-2010, 12:27 Post: 176009
AbbasChild



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 AG vs Industrial Tires

I have industrial tires on my tractor and in the summer/fall, working on gravel, and concrete/paved driveway, brush cutting fields I can go nearly anywhere--and we have some signif. slopes. In the snow, I feel more sure-footed with tire-chains on the rear and have had no problems so far plowing our 400 foot driveway. This winter I had thoughts about wanting the AG tires when we had a bit of a thaw and the path to the manure pile was 1-2 inches of mud on top of frozen ground beneath. I made it to the top of the hill, but the R4's really do not shed the mud well. As has been mentions on this site before--regarding tires--there is not one good tool for all jobs. Which is why we should have 3 good tractors in our shed! (Yeah, that did not fly well with my wife! Smile )

I plan not to do any plowing of fields or hay making with this tractor so that was really the biggest reason I did not get the AGs.

Mike






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 12-29-2010, 16:18 Post: 176015
kthompson

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 AG vs Industrial Tires

One thing Joel missed on the difference between the two is the side walls on the industrial tires are normally much stiffer. With Ag tires you often can tell by looking at them as to inflation level or not and if filled a great need to and the amount of "bag" is given in some places I have seen. The industrial tires, you best be checking with gauge as they can be low in pressure and not show until they show it creating a problem, such as tire off rim. Not good if on slope or such.

Joel, had never thought about the reason you gave why Ag tires wear out so fast on roads. Sure makes a lot of sense. Also a lot of ag tires get filled.

I have once had a Case with not sure if Firestone or Goodyear radials that to me has the best tire. They were ag tires with a broken tread looked sort of like a sheep's foot packer.

One thing to think on, many tractors with industrial tires from factory (those I have seen any way) are four wheel drive. If in dirt use of four wheel drive will help make up for tread difference.






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 12-29-2010, 21:54 Post: 176024
candoarms

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 AG vs Industrial Tires

AbbasChild,

I had to laugh at your comment concerning the wife's angry look when you told her that you need three tractors.

Tire selection is a major problem for us. There's no such thing as having the right tire for every job. We always end up making a tire choice that suits "most" of the chores we have planned for our tractors. Since we don't always have the best tire for every job, we go with 4x4 compact tractors to help make up the difference.

Kthompson,

Many farmers in this area have been putting triple tires on each corner of their big tractors........12 tires in all. The main reasons for this -- to reduce soil compaction, improve traction, and to reduce wheel slippage......or tire hopping. Tire hopping is very hard on equipment...twisted axles, engines rpms fluxuating badly, etc.

In an effort to solve all of these problems, most of the bigger tractors now come with tracks on all four corners. With the added traction this provides, the manufacturers are now installing engines with over 500 horsepower. The highest that I'm aware of is somewhere in the neighborhood of 535 horses.......and weighing in at over 52,000 lbs.

See the link below.

Joel






Link:   Case IH STX535 Quad 

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 12-29-2010, 23:22 Post: 176027
kwschumm

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 AG vs Industrial Tires

Different ground conditions (sand, sandy soil, clay, hard surface, mud, bog, etc) all have unique characteristics. Here the clay soil is sticky mud in winter and powdery in summer. Industrial tires don't work well in either condition so I traded my R4s in on Ag tires which work much better year-round here. The tread self cleans the mud and snow in the winter and gives better dry traction in the summer at the expense of leaving deep tracks in soft conditions.






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 12-30-2010, 15:21 Post: 176042
earthwrks

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 AG vs Industrial Tires

Speaking of tracks, I have 16" wide high-floatation, light-weight over-the-tire tracks for my very heavy skid steer like the one in my avatar to the left. A foot an half of mud is no match for the machine, so long as there is a "bottom" to it.

Crazy idea here but in the same vein (or is it vain?) as over-the-tire tracks--picture if you will a tire with the bead and side walls removed leaving only the tread. (In theory) picture this the ID of tire only slightly smaller than the fully inflated tires already installed. The gutted tire tread now becomes a "skin" of sorts that would slip over an deflated tire; the tire would be reinflated thus expanding inside the "skin". Skins could be available with various tread types, even ice studs for us northerners. (Patent pending---kidding)

All joking aside, it could have real potential. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.






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 12-30-2010, 16:27 Post: 176048
hardwood

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 AG vs Industrial Tires

The tire tread thing has been bashed around quite a bit, but I think we all agree each tread has a "Best Fit" situation.
KT mentioned the stiff sidewalls of the R-4's. That feature does give me a comfort factor using a loader, sorta takes the squish factor out of the rear tires to help with a more stable feeling.
Most of the early Deere compacts came with truf treads that seemsed to be quite a negative at trade in time with a local dealer here. R-4's seem to be the most popular on all but the smaller compacts here.
Joel; Power Hop.
I had a Deere 8410 wirh front wheel assist, power hop was an issue with them. On a flat steady pull it was seldom a problem but head up a sandhill and hop hop she went. Hit the clutch, throttle back then go on over the hill. Deere came with all sorts of suggestions so far as front to rear weight ratios, lowereing the tire pressure to almost flat 6 - 7 psi pressures. All that didn't help much so I usually just throttled back when I started up a hill to prevent it.
Deere claims they have it solved using their optional independent suspension "Active" front axle. I've never driven one with the optional "Active" axle, so I can't speak with any experience there.
EW;
That don't sound like a bad idea, but there has to be a way to switch the treads from the driver's seat.
Frank.






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 12-30-2010, 19:04 Post: 176051
Murf

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 AG vs Industrial Tires

Jeff, that's a very good idea except for one small problem;

It won't work. Laughing out loud

Seriously, if you look at any track, snow-mo-bubble, dozer, or even your SSL tracks they all have one thing in common, there's a way for the 'stuff' that falls in to get back out. Some have flat tracks (snow machine, dozer), some have gaps like your slip-on tracks. If not for that the debris that ends up in there more than takes up the free play and something breaks to allow some extra space. Laughing out loud

That and the inside of a tire is pretty smooth, a little water, mud or snow and the tire will spin inside the 'track' which has grip on the ground.

Now if you cut the entire sidewall out and left just the tread itself, then installed steel tangs that could hold the track in place it might work.

Best of luck.






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > New Holland Tractor Review Forum

Thread 175987 Filter by Poster:
AbbasChild 1 | bloggins 1 | candoarms 3 | earthwrks 1 | greg_g 1 | hardwood 3 | joedirt 1 | kthompson 2 | kwschumm 1 | lencamp 2 | Murf 1 | spsteve 2 | TC24daman 1 | treeman 2 |




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