Seeding the lawn: Lawn, Turf, and Grass  -- Landscape Discussion Forum and Review Seeding the lawn: Lawn, Turf, and Grass -- Landscape Discussion Forum

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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Lawn, Turf, and Grass Forum

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 04-02-2008, 09:58 Post: 152671
hardwood

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 Seeding the lawn

Murf; This weekend our lawn should be just about right to roll, not to wet, not too dry. OK, how about me spreading a top dressing of seed on the existing lawn then rolling it in right behind the broadcast seeder???? This just sounds way too simple to have it work, whaddya think???? Frank.






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 04-02-2008, 12:53 Post: 152673
Murf

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Frank, I think you're on the right track..... it's way to work. Wink yeah right

Seriously, it will work, but not well. I have no doubt that you (like me) have been kicking clods of dirt way to long to need much of a lesson on growing things, but turf is a little fussier than soybeans.

If you want to make a proper job of it, you need to do a little more prep work first.

First of all, cut the existing lawn real short if it's already popped, about 1.5" - 2" at most. This will both help the seed reach the ground, but most importantly help it get the sunshine it needs to germinate. Keep the grass cut to this height for a month if possible.

Then either dethatch or rake it very well to get all the clippings off the lawn you can.

Now you can put down the seed. Apply it according to the rates listed in the instructions supplied for 'overseeding' not new lawns.

After seeding, but before rolling it in, put down some starter fertilizer. This will really help since the new seedlings will be competing with the existing lawn for nutrients and water.

Now you can roll the new seed & fertilizer in.

Note: The usual disclaimers about me not being liable for the amount of time you spend cutting your lawn or explaining to neighbours how you got such a nice lawn apply. Wink yeah right

Best of luck.






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 04-02-2008, 13:56 Post: 152677
hardwood

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 Seeding the lawn

Murf; Once again thanks for your help an expertise. Just a bit ago I ordered the Kentucky bluegrass seed and the fertilizer, I will follow your advice to the letter. Last spring I took soil tests and followed the recommendations and applied lime and fertilizer, (9-18-9). The local elevator sells a generic bagged 9-18-9, hotmix, not cold blend for about half what the bigname lawn care fertilizers sell for in the bright beautiful bags at a lawn and garden center. Frank.






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 04-03-2008, 07:30 Post: 152689
kthompson



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Quote:
Originally Posted by hardwood | view 152677
The local elevator sells a generic bagged 9-18-9, hotmix, not cold blend



Frank, what is the difference between a "hotmix" and a "cold blend"? Thank you, kt






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 04-03-2008, 09:19 Post: 152698
Murf

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 Seeding the lawn

Kenneth, not to answer for Frank, but.......

Fertilizers are blended from several different base mixtures into one homogeneous mixture.

They are made by mixing either wet or dry ingredients into pellets. The problem with dry mixed formulas is it's hard to get a very uniform mixture in each pellet. In the case of lawn fertilizers, one of the key goals is a very equalized application to avoid burning the turf. This is best done by using a wet mix formula.

The reference to hot or cold mix relates to the way the fluids are blended. In the case of a hot mix formula, the plant blends ammonia with phosphoric acid, the resulting reaction releases considerable heat energy. This results in a better end product.

Best of luck.






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 04-03-2008, 12:45 Post: 152702
kthompson



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Murf, following up on the mix:
if mixed after mfg process it would have to be a cold mix then, correct?

But, how does that show up when used? Does it only show up in "burning the turf"? Does that mean it will burn if applied to the leaves or will it also burn a crop when applied to the root zone?

So, does the label tell you it is a "HOT" mix or what is the wording that tells this.

Thanks, kt






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 04-03-2008, 13:44 Post: 152704
Murf

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Kenneth, the hot or cold part of it with regard to liquid-based fertilizers is purely a chemical reaction.

Cold mixed fertilizers just don't use an ammonia / phosphoric acid blend to create heat that's all.

The difference is in how they are applied and the way they work. Hot mix fertilizers are generally slow-release formulas. Cold mix are faster releasing and are generally put into the soil rather than one the top.

If you are going to expose fertilizer to rain, etc., you want it to be as homogeneous as possible so that the various components are given off in equal amounts, and not one component first because it's the most soluble.

Poor quality fertilizer will not necessarily yield something that is readily visible to the average person, like burning, but that is one example. Usually it's just a very uneven application, some components are given off faster or slower, and that can stress the turf.

Best of luck.






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 04-03-2008, 13:53 Post: 152706
hardwood

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KT, There are the three most common basic elements Nitrogen=N Phosphate=P and Potash=K. Ok now pretend you have two boxes of marbles, one box has three different color marbles. Let's say the N marbles are red, the white marbes are P, and the blue marbles are K, if you dump them out on the ground, they won't likely be distributed evenly, so one sopt will have pure N one spot will have pure P, and another spot wull have only K. Now the other box had the three different colors of glass mixed together before they formed them into marbels, so when you dump that box wherever any marble lands the same ratio of N-P-K will be on the same spot. Most bagged fertilizers will be a hot mix. Cold blends are for the most part used at the local level to custom blend the ratio of NPK needed to satisfy a soil test. they just dump the three elements in the right ratio into a mixer drum, then into the spreader to go to the field. Frank






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 04-03-2008, 13:58 Post: 152707
Murf

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hardwood | view 152706
Most bagged fertilizers will be a hot mix. Cold blends are for the most part used at the local level to custom blend the ratio of NPK needed to satisfy a soil test. Frank



Now how come I can't put it that simply? So Sad

Well done as usual Frank.


Best of luck.






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 04-03-2008, 14:03 Post: 152708
hardwood

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Well Murf, now thanks for the compliment, but I never in a hundred years could have spelled Homogenous, or how ever you spelled it. Frank.






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Lawn, Turf, and Grass Forum

Thread 152671 Filter by Poster:
hardwood 5 | kthompson 3 | Murf 4 |




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