First winter with Diesel: Kubota Review  -- Kubota Tractors Discussion Forum and Review First winter with Diesel: Kubota Review -- Kubota Tractors Discussion Forum

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 10-08-2003, 16:50 Post: 65837
8NFord



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 First winter with Diesel

I'm coming up on my first winter with a diesel. I have a Kubota BX1500 here in SC. Winters are not too bad here, maybe 20-30F. Do I need to do anything special to get it started on a cold day like this?
Thank,
JD






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 10-08-2003, 16:57 Post: 65838
AC5ZO

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 First winter with Diesel

#1 Diesel is formulated for colder weather, but I have been running #2 and have had no problems. I live near Abuquerque and the typical winter temperature is 20-30 at night. The local dealer here says that they don't switch to #1.






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 10-08-2003, 17:48 Post: 65841
Chief



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 First winter with Diesel

You should be fine. I live in a similar climate and I use a summer fuel additive mainly for lubrication and cetane improvement. If it gets down into the 20's I add a fuel additive with an anti-gel in the Cummins just to be on the safe side but probably could get by without. You could call it either way and more than likely be OK. But for just a few cents a gallon, it sure is cheap insurance.






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 10-09-2003, 06:28 Post: 65862
TomG

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 First winter with Diesel

The cloud-point of summer blend #2 can be 20's. Cloud-point is where wax particles start forming in the fuel and they do have potential for slowly clogging a fuel filter.

Most service station #2 is blended for summer or winter use in regions where they're sold, and winter blend is closer to #1. For people who don't go through much fuel, there's a risk of ending up with summer blend in the middle of winter but near as I can figure there's no reason not to use a conditioner that also contains anti-gel. Shouldn't be a worry and you can ask a service station what blend they're pumping. In SC climate, cold weather aids like block heaters likely aren't required. When it's cold, just keep the battery up, use plenty of pre-heat and crack the hand throttle a little more than usual. If it doesn't catch right away, use more pre-heat and try again. Diesels don't benefit from cranking and it just dilutes the oil with fuel.






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 10-18-2003, 22:35 Post: 66555
sorefeet



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 First winter with Diesel

Howdy All,

Brand new here, but just couldn't resist asking about diesel up here in NW Montana where temps can go to -25 degrees ( I've seen it ). What to you do to treat the fuel? I planned to put in a block heater via a freeze plug if they make such a thing, or a magnetic block heater on the oil pan. Or should I put the magnetic heater on the fuel tank for over night warmth?

Just received ownership via my mom's health problems and her having to sell the "ranch" (all 3.92 acres). No -25's in central California.

Since I'm asking, what about calcium cloride vs. antifreeze in the tires for plowing snow? Cost of both? The tires are; Front: 7-16, Rear: 11.2-10-24's.

Or should I just get some chains?

Thanks in advance

Troy Rice

48*29.172
114*29.128






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 10-18-2003, 23:17 Post: 66556
kwschumm



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 First winter with Diesel

Welcome the the board! It doesn't get anywhere near that cold where we are, but having been around here for awhile I have learned a few things. I'll ramble a bit, then those who have more experience will probably chime in.

Calcium chloride is commonly used to melt ice and it will do so at something like -60 degrees F. I'm sure a suitable solution of it will work fine at -25 but I'm not sure what percentage solution would be required for your expected temperatures. The tire guys in your area will know what works. I would think CC would be better than antifreeze in this application. It's heavier and has a lower freezing point.

Recent discussions here have revealed that the block heaters that mount in freeze plug holes are more effective than the magnetic oil heaters. The oil heaters will heat the oil but the block heaters heat the engine. Kubota likely has a block heater available for your machine.

You will need to use a diesel fuel conditioners with anti-gel properties to keep the wax in the fuel from solidifying. Check the bottles for amount required to keep your fuel fresh and be sure to treat the tank and spare fuel both. The fuels and lubrication forum has voluminous discussions of these conditioners.






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 10-19-2003, 07:09 Post: 66559
TomG

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 First winter with Diesel

It's gotten close to -40F since we've been here. The tractor seldom is needed for anything but snow removal during the winter and it seldom snows here when it's that cold so the tractor can sit but a few hours on a block heater and overnight use of a battery blanket does the trick for me/

I start buying #1 diesel about this time of year and mix it what I have. I end up using pretty much straight #1 through the coldest times and start buying #2 again in late February. I use additive with anti-gel as well. The cloud point of #1 is about -25F and a fuel filter might become clogged. Keeping an extra fuel filter during the winter isn't a bad idea and the fuel tank should be kept full. Don't use 'anti-ice/fuel drying' additives unless they're rated for diesel engines and no ether.

Use of good winter oils is probably better than heating them but I do stick magnetic heaters on the cases when it's really cold. Synthetics are good in the cold and the heat. I use multi-season hydraulic oil and 5W-30 engine oil--I used to use 0W-30 but then I have to avoid using the tractor during the summer on hot days unless I change the oil.






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 10-20-2003, 09:39 Post: 66637
DRankin



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 First winter with Diesel

If your primary concern is tractor stability, fluid filled tires might work for you as long as you understand that you give up the ability to change or move the tires afterward, unless you are better than I am at moving 400-500 pound objects with your hands.

If your primary concern is increased traction, I have found that wheel weights work better than fluid.

Also keep in mind that tire chains are designed to increase traction through UNCLEARED snow and are of little value if your tires are running on a cleared path behind a blade or a snow blower. They must have something to sink into if they are to work properly.

Same reasoning for R-1 (AG) tires. In mud or on soft moist ground there is nothing better, but they are nearly useless on wet asphalt or ice.






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 10-21-2003, 07:05 Post: 66701
TomG

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 First winter with Diesel

I don't have a problem with turfs and unloaded tires for the winter work I do so I haven't any experience with what works better. It's mostly blower and light loader work. I'd probably have something to say if I depended on plowing.

Good point about tire chains on ice and I should have realized that. There are studded chains but I don't know if they'd be any better. I recall an old discussion from somewhere else where somebody installed studs--on turf tires I think. Don't know if that's a good idea either. I'm just full of definite info this morning.






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 10-21-2003, 08:22 Post: 66705
Murf

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 First winter with Diesel

Tom, it was me who used small studs, the kind used for ice racing motorcycles & ATV's.

Based on LOTS of experience I can definitely say that for clearing snow nothing beats truf tires in overall performance. In really deep snow they may be a little lacking, but chains soon fix that. Chains are also far more effective on turfs since the profile of the tire means more of the chain stays in contact with the ground.

I agree whole-heartedly with Mark, weights are not only more effective, they are MUCH easier to deal with than fluid.

Best of luck.






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Kubota Review Forum

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