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 09-09-2001, 21:22 Post: 31706
Dave Rubin



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 Newbie Seeks Definitions

Hi...I've been reading this board for a few days now as I prepare to purchase my first tractor. There are several terms that have been used that I don't understand. Perhaps you could help me out. First, there are several different types of tires being discussed....Turf, AG, and R4.....also fluid-filled. What is the significance of these, and do dealers provide a choice of these at time of purchase, or do I need to purchase some types as an add-on? Also...position control....which I guess has something to do with the TPH. What is it? Lastly, do front and rear blades simply scrape the ground, or are they set at a specific height. I am looking at the Kubota BX2200 and B7500 lines primarily. My house is on a 10 acre lot....7 acres in grass, mostly flat. I have a gravel drive which will need to be maintained, as well as needing to scrape the snows of the mid-atlantic. Thanks for your help!!






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 09-10-2001, 05:50 Post: 31712
TomG

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TIRES: I sometimes don't keep my three R's straight, so I name the tires rather than use the codes. I believe it's R1 = Agricultural, R3 = Turf and R4 = Industrial. I guess R2 are the ribbed front tires that are found mostly on farm tractors. I believe most tractors are supplied with a choice between Agricultural or Turf tires--perhaps some manufacturers have an industrial tire choice as well. Most dealers undoubtedly could supply a tractor with industrials but probably at a cost.

Tire choice is one of the more important choices to make in getting a tractor. The choice is a fairly binding one because different tire types usually come in different wheel sizes. You can't change tire types without changing wheels. The basic issues are: R1's are good for traction which is important for ground engaging work, but Ags really can't be driven on lawns. Turfs are good for lawns but have less traction on most surfaces. Industrials are seen on things like forklifts. They are rigid and give rough ride. They also are very puncture resistant have high load ratings and have treads more aggressive than turfs but less than ags. Some people get R4's, not for their industrial capability, but because they are sort of a compromise between ags and turfs. They have more traction than turfs but don't tear up a lawn like ags. In 4wd tractors, tire sets must maintain a specified ratio of front to rear tire circumference (actually it's rolling circumference that's important). Tractors have different sized front and rear tires so they also have different front and rear axle drive ratios. Any tire that may fit a rim can't necessarily be put on a 4wd tractor without causing something called 'front-axle wind-up.' Your dealer would sort out these things for you though. However, it may not be possible to find an R4 set for all tractors that maintain the rolling circumference ratio within limits.






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 09-10-2001, 05:56 Post: 31713
TomG

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POSITION CONTROL/IMPLEMENTS: Position control is what most tractors discussed here have. The 3ph-control lever sets how low the 3ph can go. Virtually all 3ph's always can float up over bumps etc., but with position control, the hitch will return to the same level. Position control is good for operations like plowing. Most control levers have locks that can be set so an implement can be raised and they lowered to the same depth. A mostly older alternative is sort of a 'centre-neutral' control. The control lever self-centres when released and puts the 3ph in neutral (neither raises nor lowers). Pull the lever one way and the 3ph lifts, the other way it lowers, and the further the lever is pulled the faster the 3ph moves. Many tractors have an additional factory option of a 'draft control' hitch. Draft control is found mostly on farm tractors. What draft-control does is attempt to keep a constant draft (or pull) on the hitch by automatically raising the 3ph when a draft heavier than a set level is encountered. Draft control is useful for plowing, because nothing makes a mess of a field like burrowing ag tires. Draft control and position control is not mutually exclusive.

Regarding implements: Basically, blades just scrape the ground. Virtually all ground-engaging implements are designed to carry themselves into the ground by their own weight. As noted, most 3phs neither hold down nor press down on implements






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 09-10-2001, 11:33 Post: 31733
BillMullens

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Tom - Do you know the specifics of how draft control works? I've always been curious about that. Thanks, Bill






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 09-10-2001, 12:15 Post: 31734
Murf

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Bill, draft control is simply an internal 3pth control valve which is connected via a spring mechanism, to the top link only. When an implement starts to exceed the spring setting, ie it is 'biting' to deep, it changes the 3 pth depth setting by raising the implement. Conversely, when the spring 'out powers' the valve, the 3 pth lowers automatically. Clear as mud, huh? Best of luck.






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 09-10-2001, 16:25 Post: 31738
glennmac



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An R2 tire is for wet, mucky soil. It is also called a "rice and cane" tire. The treads are shaped like an R1, but are twice as deep.

Neither the 2200 or the 7500 has position control. You have to go to the 2410 in the Kubota line to get it. It is very useful to me in vertically positioning my midmower, my brush cutter, and a backblade.

The 2200 only comes with turfs or something called bar turfs. No R1s or R4s.

I have R4s and dislike them intensely. They are useless in mud, worse than turfs on grass, and worse than ags for dry land traction. Having said that, I should point out that here in the east R4's are far and away the biggest seller of the options, because of their so-called compromise tread.

I would say if the majority of your tractor use is on lawns, go with turfs. If the majority of your work will be in fields, go with ags. Ags will not bother your lawn if you mow when its dry, especially with a very light tractor like a 7500.






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 09-11-2001, 06:45 Post: 31753
TomG

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Bill: Right now, I can't describe draft control much more specifically than Murf. It works in conjunction with position control. It's basically a feedback system that overlays the position control. As Murf noted, compression on the top-link can move the bracket, which is backed by a leaf spring (the draft sensing mechanism may be on the lower-links on some farm tractors). The movement is transferred through several feedback arms to a cam that works on the control valve spool. Compression on the top-link moves the feedback arms, which puts the control valve into lift mode. Draft is reduced as the implement lifts, the cam moves back and the control valve, which is spring loaded, moves out of lift mode. A lowering spooling valve opens that allows the implement to return to the depth set by position control lever. The draft control lever sets how much compression is required to put the 3ph into lift mode. Don't hold me to details though. I'm doing what I usually do. A question comes up and I try to sort it out for myself in a repair manual (repair manuals give specs and procedures but aren't very instructional). Anyway, at the moment, I don't understand enough to write a typically long description. Maybe I'm actually more clear than usual. Happy that Glennmac cleared up my mystery of the missing R2's. Now I don't know what the ribbed front tires used on tricycle farm tractors are called.






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 09-11-2001, 06:45 Post: 31754
BillMullens

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Opinions vary on tire selection. Turfs would not be able to take the punishment I give my R4's in the woods/rocks; ags would eat up my yard. R4's are better than turfs for traction and better than ags for yards. I just wish I could have one tractor with ags for the woods and another with turfs for mowing...
Bill






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 09-14-2001, 12:50 Post: 31811
Murf

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glenmac, FYI, "bar tires" are in fact your much loved R4's. I am told the name comes from the 'old days' when farmers welded steel bars on their flat steel wheels to improve traction without causing as much damage as cleats would. Since R4's are the 'modern' equivalent to that, they also get called that. Hope that helps.






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 09-16-2001, 19:08 Post: 31843
glennmac



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My first tractor was a BX2200 with "bar turf" tires and I currently own a B2910 with R4s. I am sure Murf's etymology is correct, but the BX "bar turfs" do not look like traditional R4s. They are like an HF-2 tread--a high flotation tire with shallow widely-spaced ag-like lug treads. The ribbed front tires on ag tractors are called steer wheel tires, and come with one or more ribs. My info source on treads is the Goodyear Farm Tire Handbook, which can be found on line.






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Kubota Review Forum

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