Starting BX in Real Cold Weather: Kubota Review  -- Kubota Tractors Discussion Forum and Review Starting BX in Real Cold Weather: Kubota Review -- Kubota Tractors Discussion Forum

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 01-24-2005, 14:52 Post: 104834
stemmler1



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 Starting BX in Real Cold Weather

What is the best way to start my BX1800 in 0 degree temp. I have tried covering the tractor with plastic and putting a space heated under the cover for a few hours with no results. It does not seem to be getting fuel. I keep my tractor in a pole barn so I am somewhat limited in what I can do. Someone mentioned this weekend that the fuel filter freezes and all I would have to do is get a hair dryer and direct it on the filter for a few minutes. Does this make sense to anyone.
Thanks for your help.






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 01-24-2005, 15:05 Post: 104836
beagle

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 Starting BX in Real Cold Weather

If you aren't getting fuel, the filter is probably gelled. I would recomend a bottle of Power Service Fuel treatment in the red bottle. Follow the directions on the bottle to remove the gell from the filter and anywhere else it may have formed in your fuel system. I believe the gel needs to be disolved, not thawed, but am interested in hearing if anyone has had success with the hair drier trick.

Make sure you treat you fuel as soon as you purchase it. Most over-the-road fules are treated, but for tractors sitting in cold barns for extended periods without running, you could use the extra protection.






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 01-24-2005, 15:56 Post: 104839
Murf

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 Starting BX in Real Cold Weather

We use the hair dryer trick, sort of ......

When we have to park machines on 'remote sites' such as the industrial condos we maintain and there is no indoor storage space, we use those 'portable garage' structures. In a lot of cases there isn't even electricity available.

When we need to start the machines in very cold weather we simply put two propane heaters inside the tent with the machine. One is a big 'salamander' style tube heater, 100,000 BTU minimum. The other is a little 5,000 BTU radiant like you might use camping or ice fishing. The small radiant goes under the front of the machine and warms it like parking it in the sunshine would. The big heater warms everything else.

About an hour like that will raise the temp. of the tractor quite a bit. Two plus hours and it will start at any outside temperature.

You could do the same thing inside the pole barn, just make a tent by tieing ropes to the beams and hanging a tarp in a box-shape around the machine.

BTW, if you can find them, either a really heavy old canvas tarp, or a rubberized transport truck load tarp work far better than the 'modern' poly tarps at this.

Best of luck.






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 01-24-2005, 17:59 Post: 104845
beagle

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 Starting BX in Real Cold Weather

Murf, what I was curious about was the concept of clearing a gelled fuel filter by heating it with a hair drier. Any experience with this working?






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 01-24-2005, 18:08 Post: 104846
Doc Kubota



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 Starting BX in Real Cold Weather

Beagle, that trick has never worked for me or any of the other guys in our shop that work on the 100+ hp farm tractors. We had a gelled B7510 that was in a crate, the filter was plugged solid, the filter was removed and I put it in a bag and set it on my tool box. A week later the gell was still there in the same form it was in the tractor. I have used your treatment that you recommended, it's called Diesel 911 and it works great.






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 01-24-2005, 19:54 Post: 104852
Art White



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 Starting BX in Real Cold Weather

That engine should be starting at that temp without a block heater. You must be having a problem in one area or another. Does it smoke while cranking at all?






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 01-24-2005, 20:12 Post: 104854
lucerne

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 Starting BX in Real Cold Weather

Something I used the other day on my dump truck because my block heater didn't have an end on it, was a magnetic electric block heater. You stick it to the base pan and it heats the oil and the oil heats the rest of the engine, it seemed to work fast. Heat rises so it mounts in the right place.






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 01-25-2005, 07:36 Post: 104872
beagle

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 Starting BX in Real Cold Weather

It didn't sound right, but every day is journey. I have used the Power Service with good success.

Magnetic block heaters are great, except most of these oil pans are alluminum. You need to get a little creative to get them to mount to the pan. They also will not stop the gelling problem in the fuel. You need to have the additive in the fuel to keep the parafins from gelling up.






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 01-25-2005, 08:49 Post: 104878
Murf

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 Starting BX in Real Cold Weather

Based on my experience, warming a gelled filter with a hair dryer is sort of like pushing a rope, it can be done if you have enough time and patience and under the right conditions.

The problem is that a hair dryer is warm air, outdoors in a breeze the net benefit is slim to none. Radiant heat, such as from a heat lamp which is unaffected by things like a breeze are better choice. You could in theory do it, but I suspect you'd be there a while to accomplish that task.

There is a lot of mis-information about fuel gelling.

In fact 'gelling' is a misnomer, it is actually called "cloud point" and it is not anything mystical. There is parafin wax in diesel fuel, if the tempurature drops below the point where the parafin wax solidifies wax crystals form and the fuel becomes a semi-solid mush.

However, just like any other form of parafin, it not only has a point below which it becomes a solid, it also has a point (about 1 C. higher) at which it becomes a LIQUID again. 'Gelling' is NOT a permanent change of a state.

The only way a 'gelled' filter would still be a solid after a week sitting on a tool box was if the temperature in the shop was below the cloud point, for untreated 2D fuel that is about the freezing point. I'd be asking the boss to turn the thermostat up a little bit or the wrenches will freeze to your hands. Laughing out loud. I suspect that the filter may have been clogged with something other than parafin wax crystals.

Anti-gell additives are basically just chemicals which have the ability to lower the temperature at which parafin crystals start to form. It does not remove the wax.

Best of luck.






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 01-25-2005, 08:51 Post: 104879
Murf

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 Starting BX in Real Cold Weather

Doc, you said you had a B7510 that was in acrate with a clogged filter.

I am guessing you mean a new unit being shipped in.

How is it had fuel in it, they are shipped dry, as required by law for safety reasons. They only get fuel added when they are assembled.

Best of luck.






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