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 01-12-2009, 20:14 Post: 159368
outlander54



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 4100 pump problems

Hi
I have a 1998 4100 HST.
In Nov 2006 I had to replace the charge pump (parts on service bill AM879432, AM879433, AM880337, CH10568), Trans/Hyd oil & filter (LVU800097) after 720hrs. The problem started out as the power steering would be hard to turn and got easier as the tractor ran (warmed up). Then got to a point where it was always hard to turn. The dealer said the high pressure or charge pump was gone.
Well now in Jan 2009 and at 939hrs the problem is surfacing again. I do not believe the pump should go this soon with normal wear. Does anyone know of anything that maybe contributing to these failures? All oils are changed as recommended and always kept up. I have also notice now that while snow plowing you get a hot hydraulic oil smell.
Thanks for any suggestions.






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 01-12-2009, 21:13 Post: 159370
candoarms



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 4100 pump problems

Outlander54,

There are many different possible causes for what happened to your tractor. I'll list a few of them, in no particular order of importance.

If anything here pops out at you, let's discuss the possibilities. A lot of this depends on your storage and use of the tractor.

1. Condensation of moisture in the hydraulic sump. (many factors can speed up this process)

2. Low hydraulic oil levels.

3. Oil that is too heavy for your climate.

4. Placing high demands on the hydraulic systems prior to reaching proper operating temperature.

5. Hydraulic oil cooling system has failed.

6. Oil viscosity is too low for your climate, causing premature wear.

7. Sump screen is plugged, or nearly plugged.


Joel






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 01-12-2009, 21:38 Post: 159374
jdgreen



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 4100 pump problems

You might want to check all of the oil lines from pump to the steering to make sure nothing is bent or kinked. Since you are smelling the oil, I think it is overheating for some reason. A kinked line, bad relief valve, overload from oversized tires or too much weight on front axle could do this.






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 01-12-2009, 21:47 Post: 159375
outlander54



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 4100 pump problems

Hi Candoarms
I am in the southern Ontario area. Winters around -15C and summers +27C are general limits. The traoctr is kept in a garage attached to the house.

Oil is checked regularly and I keep it full. Never have noticed any moisture on the dip stick.

I use the Hy-Gard LoVis recommended by JD.

In the summer the tractor is used to cut ~3 acres of grass with a 60" belly mower. Winter time pushing snow with a 54" blade and 300ft of stone driveway. Other times involve rototiller for garden, loader for moving mulch for flower beds, or a rear mower for cutting tall grass around the woodlot. I would say the hardest work is summer grass at high RPM and snow pushing generally around 2000RPM.

The sump screen is something I need to check. A job for this weekend.

From the CD manuals I have it shows there is a hydrostatic pump and a charge pump. On the 4100 the power steering comes from the charge pump, I believe on other models there was a separate pump. Oil from the 4.2gpm charge pump (gear unit) goes through the steering control pressure control valve set at 270psi to the power steering control valve. The variable displacement piston pump (12.6gpm) only feeds the hyrdostatic motor. I can forward pdf pages from the Tech manual if anyone needs them.






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 01-13-2009, 00:32 Post: 159381
candoarms



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 4100 pump problems

Outlander54,

Thanks for the reply. I might be able to help you through this.

If you haven't yet checked the sump screen, please do so immediately.

All fluid in your hydraulic system passes through the sump intake screen before being pumped through the hydraulic system.

If your sump screen is plugged, the charge pump will starve for fluid....essentially running it dry. This can destroy a pump in only a few minutes time. It can also cause the oil to become extremely hot.

Your screen may not appear to be plugged. Ice crystals can form on the screen when the tractor is cold. These ice crystals will melt once the oil warms up a bit. In the meantime, however, the ice can block off the flow to the hydraulic pumps, causing cavitation to occur.

There's some debate as to whether or not a sump screen is a good idea. Most hydraulics experts HATE the things.

Here's another good example of why it would be a good idea to install a temperature gauge in the hydraulic lines. If you're smelling hot oil, there's a very good possibility that your system is overheating. Cavitation is a major cause of excessive heat.

________________

Cavitation A circumstance that occurs in pumps when existing space is not filled by available fluid. Cavitation will deteriorate the hydraulic oil and cause erosion of the inlet metal.

________________

Joel






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 01-19-2009, 13:14 Post: 159591
DRankin



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 4100 pump problems

This thread woke me up. I realized that it had been 5 years since I had changed the HST fluids in my 4115.

I had only run the thing about 275 hours in the 5 years but still, its been 5 years.

So this was the second change, the first was at the 50 hour mark. This time, the intake screen had a significant amount of iron filings adhering to the built in magnets. It was by no means blocked but it was real dirty.

There was a lot of what looked like mud stuck to the magnets. it was obviously very, very fine steel or iron particles.

They were so fine that they could easily pass through the intake screen and I wondered if there was enough of that stuff generated in the system to block or compromise the spin-on filter.

Anyway, it got me to thinking that it might be a good idea to change the filter more often than the actual oil. Although it would be problematic as the filter is very low in the system and considerable oil would be lost in the transition from one filter to the next.

Maybe the answer is to have a clean bucket to catch and recycle the spillage. What do you guys think?






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 01-19-2009, 13:20 Post: 159592
kwschumm



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 4100 pump problems

That's probably not a bad idea. There are filter cones that the oil could be drained through, then change the filter and pour it back in.

My Bandit chipper uses 30 gallons of 30 weight oil in the hydraulics and the manual never says how often it should be changed, but it does specify filter change intervals. Hydraulic oil probably doesn't take near the beating as motor oil in engines.






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 01-19-2009, 13:21 Post: 159593
kwschumm



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You know, as I think about it there are water filtering funnels made for diesel fuel. I wonder if they'd work on hydraulic oil?






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 01-19-2009, 13:32 Post: 159594
candoarms



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 4100 pump problems

Drankin,

Five years is quite a long time for any oil to be kept in an open container. Hydraulic sumps, axles, engine blocks......these are nothing more than vented containers, in which moisture can accumulate through the natural process of "breathing".

If the oil appears to be clean and free of moisture, there's nothing "wrong" with re-using it. However the cost of new oil, for me, is about the same as making an insurance payment. I sleep better at night knowing that there's positively nothing wrong with the oil.

Compact tractor owners face some tough decisions. We don't put enough hours on our tractors to justify these frequent oil changes. However, if we also take into consideration the number of hours our tractors are exposed to the elements between oil changes, I believe most of us would change our fluids more often.

In your case, your tractor was exposed to heat, humidity, rain, snow, mud, etc........for over 43,000 hours since your last hydraulic oil change.

Joel






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 01-19-2009, 13:57 Post: 159596
Murf

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A couple of points stick out here to me.

First off, if the pump is going bad, the power it makes is highest when the machine (and oil) is cold and thick, not hotter and thinner.

Secondly, although it's a long shot I'd be thinking even if it's not contributing to the problem, using a machine for snow then parking it inside is a recipe for condensation in all the fluids, including fuel, not just that one.

Mark, the 'mud' you are describing is likely the worn brake linings, being steel impregnated and the brakes running in the oil, they stick to the magnet.

Best of luck.






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > John Deere Review Forum

Thread 159368 Filter by Poster:
acerguy 1 | candoarms 5 | DRankin 1 | earthwrks 1 | jdgreen 1 | kthompson 1 | kwschumm 2 | Murf 2 | outlander54 3 |




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