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 10-18-2006, 21:54 Post: 136045
brokenarrow



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In short, I have around a 2 acre sight that is slightly wet. Some spots more than others. It is at the bottom of about a 15 foot drop in elevation. This is shaped like a horse shoe. It makes a "U" and at the bottom of this "U" shaped ridge its wet after rains I feel soley because it has no where to go being surounded by the "U" shaped ridge.
???
If I was to have a water hole put in at the base of the "U" where it is the lowest and then had the land graded out and up (towards the opening of the "U"Wink yeah right do you think this would work to basically drain the rain runoff water (from the ridge) down into a confined pond/water hole?? Essentially drying up the rest of that 2 acre area at the top of this "U". BECAUSE my yard will be at the very top of this "U" and then extend up and out of there BUT I just dont like how wet that area close to my yard is. I also think, that landscaping that area and making it run down towards a pond/water hole would look real cool. Not that I need it grass (DEFINATELY NOT) but a spot that I can take the brush hog thru every couple of months and maybe plant some cool ornimentals
Question is, do you think that may work and if so, anyone know of a web page that may discuss something like this?
Thanks






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 10-19-2006, 09:24 Post: 136070
Murf

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 Land pitch

It's probably wet as much because of the soil type as it is because of the location and the slope leading to it.

In the past I've had really good luck drying up areas like this by merely digging a big hole, deep enough to be well down below the heavy clay topsoil, and then backfilling it with clean sand fill. Put a reasonable layer of well-drained sandy topsoil on top of that and plant grass. In extreme cases you can top it off with some decorative gravel.

Once you have some where for the water to go, it will not stay wet.

Best of luck.






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 10-19-2006, 12:49 Post: 136079
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The pond sounds like a good idea, but it will not dry out your property. Ponds don’t suck water out of wet clay soil. ((However)) the material that you would excavate while building the pond could be used to elevate your back yard which would most likely improve the wetness situation. Just make sure you always maintain positive drainage away from your home.






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 10-19-2006, 15:13 Post: 136086
earthwrks

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 Land pitch

I don't think it's as cut and dry if it will or won't work. Things to consider like Murf elluded to are the different stratums of soil each of which can be a conduit to allow water migration. Water table(s) or aquifiers play a big part in this equation. Where I once lived on a sandy bluff overlooking a river the water table was only 25 feet deep, even though the flood plain and the river were 40 feet down.






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 10-19-2006, 15:48 Post: 136088
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Yes, but he can’t design his drainage system on the assumption that there will be a porous layer of sand/gravel once he digs down. Unless you dig a few test pits, you have to assume poor soil conditions exist to a reasonable depth. Before I built my pond, I dug a few test pits to see what I was getting into. I dug through about 4 feet of dense clay, then I hit soft shale. I dug to about 10 feet where I hit harder shale and couldn’t efficiently dig anymore with my machine. Normally shale is not considered a good pond bottom as it can leak, however, each test hole filled up with water overnight, so I was obviously into the water table. Either way, you are going to have excavated material…. might as well use it to improve the grades in the back yard.






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 10-22-2006, 22:47 Post: 136217
brokenarrow



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This area is known for having gravel ridges. (I am having ecavation done this weekend for a soil test/perk. with a back hoe, so I will find out pretty soon)
This land (the 2 acre sight, is part of 15 acres that I bought and will be adding another 10 to the 15 to end up with 25 on this dead end road. The 2 acre area is the exact location I want to build. I am having a hard time understanding the land around me. In the past, low ground held water Laughing out loud. My area, you need to walk upwards 20' (give or take) from the road. The general area is not low. I was freaked that the ground was wet at the bottom of these ridges. I was told that the area is pretty much a sandy gravely type BUT, the ground is (or seems to be) holding water in the low spots and not letting it perk thru.
This is confusing and why I was thinking maybe a drainage pond will solve the problem?
In the horseshoe, there is a "dip" where the ground dips down and goes right back up, this would be a great spot to install a over flow for the pond since where is would drain out to is towards the road which is down hill from this spot and about an acre or so away (so there would be plenty of area for the water to go)
I dont feel I would ever have too much water but one could not be too cautious.

Again, do you all think that a pond// hole in the ground//water hole (Laughing out loud what ever you call it to be legal with the fewest permits lmao) would dry up the area? OK, wait, it may not dry it up but it would atleast give the water a place to run too right? What I cant understand is why the water is sitting on top the ground in an area that is supposed to suck it up pretty good? Guess the test will tell me ?
Here is another question,
I am having this test more than likely on top of this ridge. If it tests good (or looks like it anyways) should I ask my buddy to go down into the wet area and dig a small hole to see what the soil type is down there?? I cant imaging it would be too much different than 30 yards away??
Gettin back to the wet spots. We have had a heck of alot of rain this fall. I may be freaking out for no real reason.

Who would you call for expert advise? Would the dnr be a start (since I need to get permits from them for this excavation more than likely) maybe I will actually do this the way we legally are supposed to?
I aint even broke the ground yet and am having a craving for a smoke, (I dont smoke !!!) YET,,, Laughing out loud






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 10-23-2006, 06:33 Post: 136218
MacDaddy



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I wouldn’t worry too much. I’m sure there is a way to solve the drainage problem.

I would have your buddy do the test pit at the bottom exactly where you plan on building your pond…. If it’s not too difficult for him to get his machine down there.

If you are able to dig thru the clay to some porous layer, then your problem is solved, but you will not be building a pond there, you’ll be building a dry-well.

Its probably smart to get some expert advice. I would contact a local civil engineering firm that does a lot of drainage work. Have their guy meet you out there when you dig the test pit. Do you have a topographic survey? That would help in the decision making process as well.

In our area in NY, a pond like yours would not require any permits if less than one acre in size. Check out your State’s Dept. of Natural Resources website….
http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/water/fhp/waterway/ponds.htm






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 10-23-2006, 06:46 Post: 136219
kthompson



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 Land pitch

brokenarrow,

Our area is considered sandy. Some of it does have a high sand content but there is a layer of dirt, a very dark sand about 12 to 18 inches down that will compact and slow if not block water movement (it is called hardpan for a reason). I had a small bog hole that went away by running a subsoiler through it. Found where the water would sit on the ground was where the layer was the hardest to break.

At our first house had the same result with a more clay soil doing as Murf said.

As to permits, sure no expert but if it gets ruled WET LANDS, hope you have another site to build on.






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 12-04-2006, 21:51 Post: 137582
brokenarrow



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KT Laughing out loud, I am in the loop and YES, I know all about "wetlands" Thank you though for the warning! Technically, it would be considered (wetlands I think) but I am not building there, I am building on the ridge. I can cut any growth I want in the low area just can not mover around the soil IF it were considered "wetland" Since I am taxed as "Productive forrest" I am not technically wetland UNTIL I contact the dnr and they tell me I am? Follow me ya'll
My soil test came out great! I qualify for a Mound septic system! Better than the other option. All I needed for a convention was one more hole 75 foot away BUT I did not find one good to 36". I only had one good hole that deep, the others were good down to 24" with out any models.
I will take it!
So here we sit, wondering how I should proceed? I am leaning towards clearing the alders (that is a hint as to what is there) and letting it sit. Spraying the alders with round up version ok'd for wet area (pronto or something like that, can't remember the name) Spray it a few times to stop any new growth after cutting. See what happens? I can build the house and be happy watching the wildlife in a natural setting (no grass to cut) BUT After all the dust settles and inspectors leave, maybe I may decide to extend my back yard a bit and decorate it with a water feature Laughing out loud. The way it sits now, I have a real nice ridge that runs thru the 15 acre piece with a real nice low ridge of wet area's. This makes for a real pretty peice of land with many potentials. I will keep you all informed and thanks alot for the advice,.
I think a hole can only help with my wet area. Some good ideas up there guys, thanks






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Landscape Design Forum

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