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 01-26-2002, 15:57 Post: 34965
Peters

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 To plane or not to plane.

A friend has graciously supplied some unfinished aromatic red cedar. The cedar has been drying for some 16 years.
Should I plane both sides or a single side? I would like to leave ~ 3/4 inch and cut rabbit the edges to cover joints. The application is closets to keep the bugs at bay.






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 01-26-2002, 17:31 Post: 34970
Paul Fox



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 To plane or not to plane.

I'm assuming you're going to panel the walls of the closet with the cedar. In that case, plane one side only, to save time, as the rough side can go against the wall.

Save the shavings, lots of folks make cachets out of them to hang in other closets.

If you have an efficient way to resaw them, you only really need about 1/4" thickness for wall panelling, and it would go a lot further. ARC is pretty dear around here.






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 01-26-2002, 18:38 Post: 34971
JJT



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 To plane or not to plane.

If it was cut with a circular blade I'd plane both sides so the install lays as flat as possible. If is was cut with a band mill the rough side shold be smooth enough not to cause any problems. A little red cedar goes along way. I simple lined the undersides of my shelves in the walk in closets, 32 sq ft, rather than paneling 150 q ft of walls.






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 01-26-2002, 19:47 Post: 34977
DRankin



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 To plane or not to plane.

Wow this is great.... seedy topics, pure horse shit and now plane talk.... all on the same forum. I love it.






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 01-26-2002, 20:17 Post: 34979
Peters

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 To plane or not to plane.

Mark,
some of us sling the bull better than horse, but at least we have a group of people with exerience.
Paul; I need approximately 300 sq ft for what I need to do. I have much more than that available. I have ~ 1000 board feet cut and another 1000 board ft I could cut into boards from sq. logs. I can not easily T&G the material so I will need to keep it thicker.
JT; the material was cut with a circular saw but I could cut up the other material on a band saw which is in 6x10 x 10 ft for about 40$. I plan to panel the one wall in the walk in and then the ceilings in the other closets.






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 01-27-2002, 05:32 Post: 34988
TomG

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 To plane or not to plane.

When I was cutting wood joints with hand tools, I started with rough sawed lumber and then squared it with hand planes. I had to square all sides or the joints wouldn't be accurate when I cut them. Planing both sides might make more accurate rabbits and allow the finished joint edges to lay flat and tight.

I used a Record-Ridgeway Multi-plane to cut many of the joints. I could cut tongue & groves with the hand multi-plane in wood where a power tool wouldn't work. However, I figure that it would have taken a 10-year apprenticeship to develop real skills with the hand tools. Didnít have the time. Also didnít have the money to buy decent power tools. The multi-plane is sort of an antique tool now, and can cut most anything. However, a power plane sure would beat the assortment of hand planes I used to square the boards.






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 02-09-2002, 09:16 Post: 35426
Peters

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 To plane or not to plane.

As it turned out the question was moot. Most of the boards where thick enough that I needed a number of planer passes to get to the 3/4 finished thickness, therefore I did both sides. I have a little irregularity to the joints less than 1/16". The fit was so smooth in most cases and with out a V groove I found that, despite the nice grain, I needed a little contrast and finished nailed on the surface rather than blind.
Thanks






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Other Home Building Forum

Thread 34965 Filter by Poster:
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