Trees around ponds: Farming Ranching Agriculture  -- General Tractor Discussion Forum and Review Trees around ponds: Farming Ranching Agriculture -- General Tractor Discussion Forum

  parts   |   manuals   |   discussion   |   photos   |   podcast   |   reviews   |   specs   |   dealers   |   classifieds   |   contact   |   faq   |   myProfile   |   home          Login Now | Sign Up


FAQ:   What is a tractor?

Forum Index
New As Posted | Active Subjects



www.emerichsales.com - New & Used Equipment
          View Tractors For Sale!


www.partsbynet.com - Lawn and Garden Equipment Parts


Bernardsville Landscape Lighting
Click to Post a New Message!

Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Farming Ranching Agriculture Forum

Page [ 1 ] | 2 | | Next >>
Reply | Pop Up Window Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo
 08-07-2007, 08:11 Post: 144406
kthompson



View my Photos

View my Photos  Pics
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: South Carolina
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 5106

7
Filter by User
 Trees around ponds

We have about an acre pond with trees on all sides but the north. It is about 4 times as long north - south as the east - west direction. Across the south end is truly swamp with water standing there almost always.

Over the years trees were allowed to grow on the east and west water edge with the thought it would keep water cool for the fish. Limbs and such falling into the pond has really been a pain. If you move about 30 feet to any side of the pond there is woods that provide low angle sun light blocking. The pond does get a lot of mid morning to mid afternoon direct sun.

I have looked and fine on the web support for those trees at one web site on ponds but at most fine no mention of trees. I am considering removing all trees right along the water edge to reduce material in the pond and to aid in keeping the edge clean where you fell safe to fish it.

This is in the hot and sunny coast of South Carolina. Any thoughts on the trees. Thanks, kt






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

 08-07-2007, 09:09 Post: 144407
Murf

TP Contributor

View my Photos

View my Photos  Pics
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Toronto Area, Ontario, Canada
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 7020

4
Filter by User
 Trees around ponds

Kenneth, first off, there is much debate over using trees to shade a pond.

One side claims the shade helps lower water temperature, the other side (rightly IMHO) points out that the solar gain is nothing compared to the cooling effect of exposing so much water to the earth a few feet down.

I know I've measured (with a pool thermometer) the temperature of the water at both the surface and bottom of many ponds. The spread between top & bottom is often dramatic, in my own small pond (1/2 acre, 8' deep at the deepest point, mostly 5' deep) and this time of year the surface is 78 and the bottom is about 58.

In nature fish naturally just change the point at which they find the water temperature comfortable, but that doesn't stop them moving into warmer or cooler areas to feed and such.

In short, I find the trees add so much organic material to the pond that it's not worth having them there.

Also, it's the plant material that turns the water turbid (muddy looking) and the added nutrient loading causes excessive plant growth along the banks.

Best of luck.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

 08-07-2007, 10:38 Post: 144415
earthwrks

TP Contributor

View my Photos

View my Photos  Pics
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Home Office in Flat Rock, Michigan
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 3853
 Trees around ponds

Kenny: In English please! "I have looked and fine on..." "...most fine no..."

You still can't "fine" the spell check key? And I'm the one who drives in circles? Aaaahem.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

 08-07-2007, 11:21 Post: 144421
kthompson



View my Photos

View my Photos  Pics
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: South Carolina
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 5106

7
Filter by User
 Trees around ponds

Jeff ole boy read that ole boy, one day if the Lord lets you live long enough you will be OLD BOY and your eyes will have problems with small fonts too my fiend (R missing on purpose my friend). Then this Southern Gentleman will try not to laugh at the now Broken Down OLD Northerner.

That along with I am doing what I can to bring you some form of pleasure into your other wise dull life. Smile Smile
I guess looking over a BLUE hood has to give you a BLUE outlook. Sorry.







Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

 08-07-2007, 11:34 Post: 144423
candoarms



View my Photos

View my Photos  Pics
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: North Dakota
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1929

4
Filter by User
 Trees around ponds

KThompson,

I lived on a small farm in Georgia for three years, while in the Army. (Fort Gordon....Harlem Georgia)

We had a pond behind the place about the same size as yours. It was stocked with catfish and bluegill. I spent many evenings out there when it it was too hot in the house.

There were no trees surrounding the pond. My landlord found it necessary to feed his fish daily, simply because any bait-fish he placed in the pond would quickly disappear. The bait-fish had no place to hide, nor to spawn.

Old man Fletcher placed evergreens in one end of the pond, after I suggested that he provide a place for the bait-fish to gather, spawn, and protect themselves from the bigger fish. By the second year, we had plenty of food for the bluegills and the catfish.

Here in North Dakota, the wildlife groups take up a Christmas tree drive every January. They ask that everyone place their Christmas trees along the curb, for free pickup. These wildlife groups then attach concrete blocks to the stumps of these trees, and then place them in the water, through the ice, so that bait-fish in our lakes will have a safe place to reproduce. It's worked wonders on many smaller lakes here in North Dakota.

You might be able to remove most of the trees along the shore of your pond. However, I would strongly consider dropping at least a few of those trees in the water, on one end of the pond, to serve as a shelter and feeding area for your fish. You might be surprised at how effective this can be.

Joel






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

 08-07-2007, 13:09 Post: 144429
kthompson



View my Photos

View my Photos  Pics
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: South Carolina
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 5106

7
Filter by User
 Trees around ponds

Candoarms,
It would seem a tree like those normally used for Christmas tree would be best for this compared to a single limb or tree trunk to provide the shelter in the water. Is that correct? kt






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

 08-07-2007, 13:38 Post: 144432
candoarms



View my Photos

View my Photos  Pics
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: North Dakota
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1929

4
Filter by User
 Trees around ponds

KThompson,

We use Christmas tress, simply because it's the only source of trees we have available to us. We don't waste any trees....because we don't have any.

Any tree will work. Large branches, stumps, and limbs are actually better, simply because they'll last so much longer before they rot and fall apart.

The rotting trees will attract water beetles and other insects, which will attract and feed the bait-fish. In the meantime, your fish will gather around the trees to spawn, feed, and to escape the heat.

Fishermen love to fish around fallen timber, as it makes for a community gathering point for nearly all types of fish....mainly because of the large amount of food available there.

Joel






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

 08-07-2007, 13:56 Post: 144434
candoarms



View my Photos

View my Photos  Pics
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: North Dakota
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1929

4
Filter by User
 Trees around ponds

KThompson,

I have an idea which might help you decide how to handle this.

First off....what type of fish do you keep in your pond? Crappie, bluegill, catfish?

How often do you restock it, if ever?

Is it necessary to feed your fish, or is there enough food in the pond to keep them healthy and growing?

Are your fish small in size, and never seem to grow very big?

With the answers to these questions in hand, your local fish and wildlife manager would be able to provide you the best advice for managing fish ponds in your area......free of charge. He may also suggest that you stock a different species of fish. He may also be able to provide you with the fish, at little or no cost.

Give your local game and fish department managers a call. They'll be happy to hear from you, and they'll offer all kinds of advice.

Just make sure you don't get yourself wrapped up in a government program that will tie your hands behind your back well into the future. And yes....there are many such programs available.

Joel






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

 08-08-2007, 16:10 Post: 144454
SG8NUC



View my Photos

View my Photos  Pics
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: g
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 579

4
Filter by User
 Trees around ponds

KT,

I cut down several trees tied nylon line to the trunks and placed them in the pond with the trunks on shore. The nylon line was so I could remove them if I wanted to. This gives the small fish a safe haven. Any standing trees around ponds will keep adding leaves, limbs and such that they will fill it in after a time. Pine trees are the worse. Sun light helps from what I could find out. I agree with Murf the a pond with any depth will cool itsself by ground surface. Mine is several degrees cooler a few feet down.






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

 08-08-2007, 16:32 Post: 144456
kthompson



View my Photos

View my Photos  Pics
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: South Carolina
TractorPoint Premium Member -- 5 Tractors = Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 5106

7
Filter by User
 Trees around ponds

SG,

What did you ever do on the bridge? How old is your pond? kt






Reply to PostReply | Quote Post Reply to PostQuote Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo




Bookmarks: Digg It | Del.icio.us | Stumble This

Reply | Pop Up Window Reply | Add PhotoAdd Photo


Page [ 1 ] | 2 | | Next >>

Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Farming Ranching Agriculture Forum

Thread 144406 Filter by Poster:
candoarms 4 | earthwrks 1 | kthompson 7 | Murf 4 | SG8NUC 4 |




Most Viewed

+ Online Used tractor price guide
+ dump truck or dump trailer
+ Do you lend your tractor?
+ Just installed a Pat's Quick Hitch - Some comments
+ ever thought about moving?
+ Best Manure Spreaders Review
+ TRACTOR TAX WRITE/OFF
+ Hobby Farm Harvesting Equipment
+ It's raining INSIDE my new Pole Barn!
+ Subsoiler in pasture

Most Discussion

+ dump truck or dump trailer
+ SW Michigan Relocation
+ Mahindra pricing versus JD,Kab
+ ever thought about moving?
+ Price of Goods to grower.
+ Sisal and Plastic twine prices
+ Do you lend your tractor?
+ Clover over septic field. Good
+ My 8 acres farming lot only ha
+ Side-Hill Operaion

Newest Topics

+ Howdy Tractorpointers
+ Contaminated Hydraulic Oil
+ drill big holes
+ Sounds that normally mean bad news
+ Correct method to check Hydraulic oil levels
+ Sprayer GPM controls
+ JD 4066 with Backhoe attachment question
+ Potato diggers
+ sand point well
+ Hay or row crops













Turbochargers for Tractors and Industrial Machines
Cab Glass for Tractors and Industrial Machines

Alternators for Tractors and Industrial Machines
Radiators for Tractors and Industrial Machines

Driveline Components for Tractors and Industrial Machines
Starter Motors for Tractors and Industrial Machines