Block heaters do I need one?: Diesel Fuel Lubrication Engine Additives  -- Tractor Maintenance Discussion Forum and Review Block heaters do I need one?: Diesel Fuel Lubrication Engine Additives -- Tractor Maintenance Discussion Forum

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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Diesel Fuel Lubrication Engine Additives Forum

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 10-08-2001, 07:34 Post: 32276
Eddie Suckow



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 Block heaters, do I need one?

This will be my first winter with a diesel blowing snow. It'll sleep in the heated garage most of the time but it may occasionally stay outdoors (hopefully not though). I'm on the top of a hill in central Maine, real windy and cold. Do I need a block heater for those occasional times it stays outside or will it crank?----Also, when do I need to start putting additive in the diesel? It's in the 50's during the day and 30's at night right now.---Thanks, big ed






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 10-08-2001, 15:20 Post: 32283
steve arnold



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 Block heaters, do I need one?

my deere (with good battery) always started down to -10F, no heater.






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 10-08-2001, 21:44 Post: 32302
Roger L.



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 Block heaters, do I need one?

I figure that the block heater isn't just about starting - I think that a warm engine wears less and lasts longer. Certainly it doesn't cost much to buy one. They are about $25 and then you have it if you want to use it. There isn't any downside to them.
The same goes for the diesel additive. Put it in the tractor and the fuel container now and then you won't have to wonder when. It won't hurt it anything if you run it in warm weather.
Some of the diesel lore comes to us from big industrial engines made to be run continuously and where a few pennies/gallon in additive is a noticible amount of money. But it doesn't work the same when you scale it down to compact tractor size.






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 10-09-2001, 06:56 Post: 32309
Eddie Suckow



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 Block heaters, do I need one?

Thanks for the input. I may keep my eyes open for a cheap heater but will probably just see how it does without. My garage has radiant floor heating so the tractor should warm up fairly fast, as far as the cold start thing goes. I have a block heater on my truck that I never use, wonder if it can be rigged to work on the tractor? --- big ed






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 10-09-2001, 07:04 Post: 32310
TomG

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 Block heaters, do I need one?

I've got the same notion as others. Block heaters are good in cold climates and not just because the engine may be a bit easier to start. There was a discussion awhile back about a spun bearing on an older Ford. The owner summarized and said that he was going to use a heater in the future. I believe the idea is that very cold engines and thick oil could contribute to the spun bearing. An issue that hasn't been mentioned is starter motor speed. Diesels have to spin fast to start. A warm engine spins easier and is less of a challenge for the starter and battery. For specifics on diesel additives, the cloud points of some #2 summer blends can be as high as 30F. The cloud point is the temperature at which wax crystals start to form and can clog a fuel filter. It doesn't take actually gelled fuel to stop a diesel. I use an additive that contains anti-gel as well as injection pump lubrication. As Roger says, the stuff is really almost free to run in a compact. I also start buying #1 diesel about this time of year since there is a nearby supplier of off-road #1. I believe the cloud point of most #1 is around -25F. It gets colder than that here so I still use an additive.






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 10-09-2001, 07:12 Post: 32311
Roger L.



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 Block heaters, do I need one?

Eddie, with radiant heat your tractor will be more comfortable than I will be this winter! Tho' I'm wondering if we are talking about the same type of block heater. I used to use an outboard heater system called a Red Devil. Believe it cost about $100....It was fairly bulky, used radiator hose to make the connections, leaked all the time, and probably should have had its own pump. Plus it didn't heat all that well.
The modern block heater is a heating element that fits in place of a freeze plug in the block. It has it's own element on the inside and a socket built into the surface of the plug replacement. The whole device takes up no more room than a freeze plug and the last one I got cost $19.95....plus $10.00 installation because I was feeling rich enough to hire it done that day.






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 10-09-2001, 09:30 Post: 32319
Art White



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 Block heaters, do I need one?

Many of the new tractors will start without the assistance of a block heater, that doesn't mean that they won't last longer if the engine is warm from a heater. The battery being heated is another way to ensure a good start as a battery looses much of it's ability to start a engine, up to fifty percent, when it does get around zero.






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 10-09-2001, 13:18 Post: 32329
Eddie Suckow



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 Block heaters, do I need one?

Wow, didn't know they were only $20. I guess I could just put the antifreeze that's in it back in after I install the heater right? The kind on my truck is the freeze plug type, only type I've seen. I'm wondering if my tractor being hydro makes any difference on this subject, it definitely helps to have that fluid a little warm from the start.--big ed






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 10-09-2001, 20:23 Post: 32331
Roger L.



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 Block heaters, do I need one?

Yes, you can reuse the antifreeze of course. I don't think that being hydro would make any difference, but you might want to inquire if they have a similar heater for the transmission. Some brands do and others don't. My old US Yanmar is similar to a JD1050 and has a modified shuttle shift with a pressure lubricated transmission. So heating it up does help the shifting in real cold weather. The same oil reservoir works the power steering and 3pt - and the same sort of heater fits the tranny. It is more specialized than the one for the block. I paid $37.26 for the transmission heating element.






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 10-10-2001, 04:56 Post: 32332
TomG

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 Block heaters, do I need one?

It might be easier to use multi-season, or synthetic, hydraulic oil rather than try to keep it heated. My NH dealer recommended using F200, which is a multi-season version of the 134D that is speced in my manual. Even so, I still use one or two magnetic heaters on the sump. Once last winter, it was so cold that my loader worked normally after warming up the tractor. After being outside for about 15 minutes or not using the loader, I wanted to stack some snow. I put the loader in float to pick up a bucket, and the thing sort of eased down in slow motion. It worked normally again until I didn't use it for awhile. I figure that warm oil from the sump chilled and thickened in the loader cylinders. Anyway, I got that effect while using multi-season oil. I don't think it would do the TX or pump any good at all to unwarmed straight-weight oil during the winters we get here. Regarding re-using anti-freeze. Yes, reusing it is good. Common anti-freeze is supposed to be disposed of properly, which is a pain so I wouldn't throw away anything I could reuse. On the other hand, anti-freeze in diesels is supposed to be changed every two years, and a diesel rated anti-freeze used. My owner's manual doesn't say that. My dealer says he's had machinery where engines have been ruined through not changing the anti-freeze.






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Diesel Fuel Lubrication Engine Additives Forum

Thread 32276 Filter by Poster:
Art White 3 | bcunderwood 1 | Eddie Suckow 3 | John Mc 1 | Peters 5 | Roger L. 5 | sgbotsford 1 | steve arnold 3 | TomG 5 |




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