Sulfer Levels in Diesel Fuel: Diesel Fuel Lubrication Engine Additives  -- Tractor Maintenance Discussion Forum and Review Sulfer Levels in Diesel Fuel: Diesel Fuel Lubrication Engine Additives -- Tractor Maintenance Discussion Forum

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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Diesel Fuel Lubrication Engine Additives Forum

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 00-00-0000, 00:00 Post: 20132
JonB



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 Sulfer Levels in Diesel Fuel

Will diesel engines be damaged if sulfer levels are reduced? The California Air Resources Board is proposing that diesel fuel sulfer levels (in California) be reduced to between 15 to 50 parts per million. So I'm concerned about how this will affect my compact. They are also proposing a diesel soot traps be installed on all diesel engines. I'm trying to find out more out this and will post more when I find out. The California Farm Federation has an article on this, and hopefully this link will take you there. JonB






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 09-29-2000, 06:46 Post: 20158
Greg Harrison



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 Sulfer Levels in Diesel Fuel

The sulfur in the fuel isnt the issue. The hydrotreating process used to remove the sulfur caused a loss of lubrication to the pump. According to Mobil the lubrication is not now an issue due to additives etc. they further advise that for most engines offroad that #2 diesel is the fuel of choice. It is denser and has more Btu's per a given volume. Plus it is lower in viscosity thus when squeezed by the injector pump especially if the pump is worn , the pump will leak more and provide less fuel to the engine. Power can be reduced 1 to 7 %. This is per their info not my guess or estimation. The best course of action is to always use #2 offroad and/or add a quality fuel additive. The offroad #2 contains .5 percent sulfur to conform to ASTMD 975 guidlelines.
Happy Tractoring
Greg






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 09-29-2000, 06:49 Post: 20159
Greg Harrison



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 Sulfer Levels in Diesel Fuel

oops let me correct my previous post. The #1 diesel has less viscosity and produces lower power than #2. I obviously mispoke myself in stating the #2 is thinner and provides less power. Sorry bout that

Greg Harrison






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 09-29-2000, 09:03 Post: 20168
Norm



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 Sulfer Levels in Diesel Fuel

It never hurts to use a good diesel fuel additive - it increases the lubricity and reduces moisture which can cause gelling of the fuel and internal corrosion of engine parts. You would also benefit greatly to use an additive that has a winter gel temperature lowering component. It keeps the fuel from gelling in cold weather without the loss of hp associated with mixing with or using #1. I use a product called DEE-ZOL+ and am very happy with it. There are others on the market that I do not have direct experience with.






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 09-29-2000, 14:05 Post: 20173
JonB



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 Sulfer Levels in Diesel Fuel

Greg & Norm, Thanks for your good information. I've been using additives but didn't know lubrication was part of the reason. I don't think DEE-ZOL+ is available in Califonria (more regulations) but I'll find a good one. I also found out these new California regulations will not affect compact tractors (off road diesels under 175 HP) -- whew! Sometimes it makes me want to move east. Thanks again for your help. JonB






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 12-20-2000, 08:58 Post: 22651
Tim Bartlett



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 Sulfer Levels in Diesel Fuel

In Massachusetts where I live the sulfur levels are as follows,
#2 low sulfur content by weight is .05% Max.
#2 high sulfur content is .5% max and is dyed red per IRS.
K1 is sulfur content is .04 max and red.
#2 heating oil varies depending on where it is sold from .2 to .4% and is also red, the only problem with this fuel may be gelling and poor starting in the winter due to possibly lower cetane levels which is a measure of it’s ability to ignite however additives can correct this.
I have used it with no problems in the winter.
It is true that the sulfur in the fuel is a lubricant and removal caused problems with premature pump wear however it has been corrected with additives.
Low sulfur fuel also allows oil changes to be extended due to less acid being formed in the combustion process, which is a good thing.
Hope this sheds lignt on the subject.






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 02-11-2001, 20:56 Post: 24119
Todd



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 Sulfer Levels in Diesel Fuel

Somebody up here in Vermont told me he added a few ounces on Marvel Mystery oil to his diesel fuel, to replace the lubricants it seems the fuel companies have already replaced. Since I haven't found any anti-gels that stated they contain fuel pump lubricants, and hadn't read the above posts before today, I'm curious to know if this stuff is worth adding. I've been doing it, but given how thin it is, maybe it's doing more harm than good. Anyone know? I've also just been going to the Sunoco station down the street and buying whatever diesel they sell. Will the different stations have different fuels (#1 or #2), or will they all be #1 because it's cold up here? Maybe I should have paid more attention in chemisty class, but I don't recall anything this practical ever being covered.






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 02-12-2001, 05:19 Post: 24124
TomG

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 Sulfer Levels in Diesel Fuel

Pumps obtain some lubrication from fuel sulfur content. Most, or all, also are lubricated by crankcase oil. The increasingly low levels of sulfur allowable in on-road fuel reduce pump lubrication. Older pumps may suffer, and I don't know whether pumps for newer tractor are re-engineered to compensate for the reduced lubrication from the fuel. EPA requirements for road fuel are not applied to off-road fuel, and off road fuel may have higher sulfur content (there's no guarantee of higher sulfur content, but it is cheaper). Most suppliers do supply winter blends of #2 that are less subject to gelling. However, use of an anti-gel is still a good idea, because the cloud point for some winter blends 15F. The anti-gel, or conditioning, additives carried in many automotive stores tend not to also contain a pump lubricant. However, the additives carried in tractor stores usually do. Several brands are available, and I forget which one I use. This winter I am running straight #1 off-road, which has typical cloud point of -25F. It gets colder than that here, so I still use an additive. The flash point for #1 also is lower than for #2 so it starts easier as well. You might try a tractor store for a 'one additive does everything' product. Ironically, the pump lubricant found in fuel conditioners often is sulfur—at least judging from the colour of my additive.






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Diesel Fuel Lubrication Engine Additives Forum

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