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 01-12-2002, 13:51 Post: 34476
Paul Fox



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 Designer Sheds

Somebody mentioned "designer" plans for sheds, and the desire of some folks to have something a bit difrerent.

Along those lines, I built an octagonal shed for my sheep, with a small cupola. I prefabbed the sections, and tipped them up and spiked them together. Very easy to build, and something a bit different.

Check the link for pictures.






Link:   Octagonal Shed 

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 01-12-2002, 20:18 Post: 34483
john hunter



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 Designer Sheds

That is a very like shed. I think you have been riding the tractor to long. If I am not mistaken that sheep looks like a dog.
I think I will build one of those sheds so my wife can keep her garden supplies in.






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 01-12-2002, 20:43 Post: 34485
Paul Fox



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Heh, heh, heh...

That's The Grumpasaurus. She keeps the ram away so I can bend over and pound nails without looking over my shoulder all the time... ":^)






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 01-13-2002, 07:10 Post: 34495
JJT



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 Designer Sheds

Very nice shed. Would you go octagonal again? Any idea how much additional time was spent building this vs a square/rectangular shed? How difficult was the roof? Any thing you would do different? Where'd you get the plans and what it the footprint/sq footage? I'll be building a gazeebo this summer, so I'm looking for best practices. Thanks, JT






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 01-13-2002, 07:46 Post: 34497
Paul Fox



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"Plans" came right out of my pointy little head. Not significantly more difficult to build than an ordinary shed. I don't recall the diameter, I'd have to run down and measure to be sure, but it's either 12 or 15 feet between opposite panels. Basically I staked out the octagon, stood inside the "circle", looked around and said, "Yeah, that looks big enough". First layout was too small. Also gave some consideration to the length of each segment. Original idea was for 4' segments, but that made it too small. I think the panels are a tad over 5' as shown.

Next step was to get the "foundation" in place. Cut the bottom sills out of 2x8 treated lumber. Using this as a pattern, placed, butted and leveled cement blocks. Then I laid the 2x8 over and drilled holes in the board centered over the outermost cells of the blocks to put J bolts in for anchors. Drilled smaller holes over each cell in the rest of the blocks. Then I poured concrete in each cell of each block, put J bolts in the outer cells, set the boards down over, and put BIG galvanized spikes (that I had layijng around from a scrounging mission) in each of the center cells. This ties all the blocks together and keeps them from kicking out. The whole thing floats on top of the ground.

The 7 panels I prefabbed in the shop. I ripped 22.5 degree bevels on the outside of the end studs, other than that, normal procedures.

Roof was not bad, just butted the first two rafters together and nailed them. Next two rafters butted to them at 90 degrees. Then cut 4 more rafters with a V shaped end and butted and nailed into the intersections of the first four. Then cut blocking to make the small octagon up near the peak, and the last 8 rafters butt to them. Did make one mistake here, when I cut the rafter tails. I cut each one a fixed distance from the wall. That meant that the one in the center of each panel was slightly longer than the ones at the ends of the panel. This made decking the roof more difficult that it should have been. Next time, I'll cut the ones at the corners of the panels to length, then snap a line between them to cut the center one to length.

Lots of extra waste when shingling, due to the angle cuts at each joint in the roof. Had to make two extra trips for shingles.

It was fun to build, it's visually attractive, and it's been plenty rugged, even though it's framed completely with 2x4's, less the sills over the blocks. Yup, if I needed another shed, I'd do it again. In fact, on a slightly smaller scale, it'd make a nifty garden shed. Lots of places to hang tools...






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 01-13-2002, 08:04 Post: 34499
TomG

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Looks like a pretty good design. An octagonal shape will provide more floor area per linear wall length than four sided structures. Saves material costs and fuel costs too for structures that have to be heated.

I knew about bending over and rams (billy goats too). Works just like the cartoons. However, I though it was turkeys rather than sheep that are kept in octagonal buildings. Maybe there are turkey's lurking out of site along with the sheep. Boy that dog does a good job.






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 01-14-2002, 07:56 Post: 34553
Paul Fox



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Oddly enough, I do raise a few turkeys. They're on the other side of the pasture in a little rectangular building.






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 01-15-2002, 07:10 Post: 34589
TomG

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It's good if the turkeys are a long way off. My university's experimental turkey farm was in back of an under-grad dorm I lived in. The old dears would get disturbed middle of the night sometimes. You'd wake up to courses of gobbles. Didn't do anything for sleep or study. I used to wonder if the experiment was the turkeys or the students. They moved the farm by the time I got out of the military and returned to school.

I don't suppose the dog really would be needed to watch the turkeys for you. However, my uncle did have a rooster the dog might have helped with. It was given to spurring people in the back of the legs—at least according to my cousins. I heard that my uncle eventually banished the rooster to another barnyard where it lived to a ripe old age--lucky rooster.

Octagonal buildings for turkeys is a kid impression of mine. I remember asking what those buildings were. The answer was they were for turkeys. They were better than 4-sided buildings because turkeys are given to panic and can pile up in a corner killing those on the bottom. Like kid impressions, this one might lack representativness or accuracy, but it's still a story. The rooster is another impression.






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Discussion Boards > Active Subjects > Messages as Posted > Carpentry Forum

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